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Do babysitters have more kids? The effects of teenage work experiences on adult outcomes

Author

Listed:
  • Zeynep Erdogan

    (Tilburg University)

  • Joyce P. Jacobsen

    (Department of Economics, Wesleyan University)

  • Peter Kooreman

    (Tilburg University)

Abstract

If the type of work undertaken while young affects either development of human capital or preferences, then early work experiences may have measurable effects on later life outcomes. This paper examines whether or not having a job as a teenager, and whether or not it is a childoriented job, causes differences in labor market behavior among young adults. While the effects we find are complex and sometimes hard to interpret, they suggest that work in 10th grade has a positive causal effect on later labor market outcomes and delays family formation, but to a lesser extent when jobs were child-oriented.

Suggested Citation

  • Zeynep Erdogan & Joyce P. Jacobsen & Peter Kooreman, 2012. "Do babysitters have more kids? The effects of teenage work experiences on adult outcomes," Wesleyan Economics Working Papers 2012-005, Wesleyan University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:wes:weswpa:2012-005
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    File URL: http://repec.wesleyan.edu/pdf/jjacobsen/2012005_jacobsen.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kooreman, Peter, 2009. "The early inception of labor market gender differences," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 135-139, April.
    2. Franz Buscha & Arnaud Maurel & Lionel Page & Stefan Speckesser, 2007. "The Effect of High School Employment on Educational Attainment : A Conditional Difference-in-Differences Approach," Working Papers 2007-40, Center for Research in Economics and Statistics.
    3. V. Joseph Hotz & Lixin Colin Xu & Marta Tienda & Avner Ahituv, 2002. "Are There Returns To The Wages Of Young Men From Working While In School?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 84(2), pages 221-236, May.
    4. Ruhm, Christopher J, 1997. "Is High School Employment Consumption or Investment?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 15(4), pages 735-776, October.
    5. John H. Tyler, 2003. "Using State Child Labor Laws to Identify the Effect of School-Year Work on High School Achievement," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 21(2), pages 353-380, April.
    6. Meyer, Robert H & Wise, David A, 1983. "The Effects of the Minimum Wage on the Employment and Earnings of Youth," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 1(1), pages 66-100, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Babysitting and labor market outcomes
      by Economic Logician in Economic Logic on 2013-08-07 20:06:00
    2. Do Babysitters Have More Kids? The Effects of Teenage Work Experiences on Adult Outcomes
      by maximorossi in NEP-LTV blog on 2012-10-12 22:36:56

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Holford, Angus, 2016. "Do parents tax their children? Teenage labour supply and financial support," ISER Working Paper Series 2016-05, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    2. Holford, Angus, 2020. "Youth employment, academic performance and labour market outcomes: Production functions and policy effects," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(C).

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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