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Time to Work or Time to Play: The Effect of Student Employment on Homework, Sleep, and Screen Time

Author

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  • Charlene Marie Kalenkoski

    () (Ohio University)

  • Sabrina Wulff Pabilonia

    () (U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)

Abstract

We use detailed time-diary information on high school students’ daily activities from the 2003–2008 American Time Use Surveys (ATUS) to investigate the effects of employment on the time a student spends on homework and other major activities. Time-diary data are more detailed and accurate than data derived from responses to “usual activity” survey questions underlying other analyses and capture the immediate effects of working that may well accumulate over time to affect future outcomes. Our results suggest that employment decreases the time that high school students spend on homework, which is human-capital building, on all days, but also decreases screen time on non-school days, which may be considered unproductive time. Employed teens get more than the recommended amount of sleep on school days, and only slightly less on non-school days.

Suggested Citation

  • Charlene Marie Kalenkoski & Sabrina Wulff Pabilonia, 2011. "Time to Work or Time to Play: The Effect of Student Employment on Homework, Sleep, and Screen Time," Working Papers 450, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
  • Handle: RePEc:bls:wpaper:ec110080
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    Cited by:

    1. Charles L. Baum & Christopher J. Ruhm, 2016. "The Changing Benefits of Early Work Experience," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 83(2), pages 343-363, October.
    2. Manudeep Bhuller & Magne Mogstad & Kjell G. Salvanes, 2017. "Life-Cycle Earnings, Education Premiums, and Internal Rates of Return," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 35(4), pages 993-1030.
    3. Seung-Eun Cha & Ki-Soo Eun, 2014. "Gender Difference in Sleep Problems: Focused on Time Use in Daily Life of Korea," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 119(3), pages 1447-1465, December.
    4. Molina, Jose Alberto & Campaña, Juan Carlos & Ortega, Raquel, 2015. "Time dedicated by consumers to cultural goods: Determinants for Spain," MPRA Paper 68430, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Fuchs, Benjamin, 2015. "The Effect of Teenage Employment on Character Skills and Occupational Choice Strategies," Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 113030, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    6. Baert, Stijn & Rotsaert, Olivier & Verhaest, Dieter & Omey, Eddy, 2015. "A Signal of Diligence? Student Work Experience and Later Employment Chances," IZA Discussion Papers 9170, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Rokicka, Magdalena, 2014. "The impact of students' part-time work on educational outcomes," ISER Working Paper Series 2014-42, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    8. José Alberto Molina & Juan Carlos Campaña & Raquel Ortega, 2016. "Time spent on cultural activities at home in Spain: Differences between wage-earners and the self-employed," Documentos de Trabajo dt2016-01, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales, Universidad de Zaragoza.
    9. Neyt, Brecht & Omey, Eddy & Verhaest, Dieter & Baert, Stijn, 2017. "Does Student Work Really Affect Educational Outcomes? A Review of the Literature," GLO Discussion Paper Series 121, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    10. Molina, Jose Alberto & Campaña, Juan Carlos & Ortega, Raquel, 2016. "Internet and the elderly in Spain: Time dedicated to search and communications," MPRA Paper 74419, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Kady Marie-Danielle Body & Liliane Bonnal & Jean-François Giret, 2014. "Does student employment really impact academic achievement? The case of France," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(25), pages 3061-3073, September.
    12. Joe S. Ballard & E. Anthon Eff, 2014. "Working for the Weekend: A Time Allocation Model for Student Workers," Journal for Economic Educators, Middle Tennessee State University, Business and Economic Research Center, vol. 14(1), pages 108-119, Fall.
    13. Darolia, Rajeev, 2014. "Working (and studying) day and night: Heterogeneous effects of working on the academic performance of full-time and part-time students," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 38-50.
    14. repec:kap:reveho:v:15:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s11150-015-9297-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Scheffel, Juliane, 2013. "Does Work-Time Flexibility Really Improve the Reconciliation of Family and Work?," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79992, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    16. José Alberto Molina & Juan Carlos Campaña & Raquel Ortega, 2017. "Children’s interaction with the Internet: time dedicated to communications and games," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(6), pages 359-364, March.
    17. Sprietsma, Maresa, 2015. "Student employment: Advantage or handicap for academic achievement?," ZEW Discussion Papers 15-085, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    18. Molina, Jose Alberto & Campaña, Juan Carlos & Ortega, Raquel, 2015. "What do you prefer for a relaxing and cultural time at home: Reading, watching TV, or listening to the radio?," MPRA Paper 68454, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    teenagers; employment; high school; time allocation;

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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