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Part-time work, school success and school leaving

  • Christian Dustmann


  • Arthur Soest


This paper analyses the labour supply decisions of a cohort of 16 year-olds who were born in 1958 in England and Wales. It traces through the effects of part-time employment by teenagers still in full-time education on subsequent academic performance and school leaving decisions within a three equation structural model. Our results show that part-time work, educational attainment and school leaving decisions are all related to each other. Our analysis examines the impact of a wide range of variables on these events. We find, for instance, that class size not only affects exam performance, but has also an impact on school leaving decisions.

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Article provided by Springer in its journal Empirical Economics.

Volume (Year): 32 (2007)
Issue (Month): 2 (May)
Pages: 277-299

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Handle: RePEc:spr:empeco:v:32:y:2007:i:2:p:277-299
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  1. Christopher J. Ruhm, 1995. "Is High School Employment Consumption or Investment?," NBER Working Papers 5030, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Pradhan, M.P. & van Soest, A.H.O., 1995. "Formal and informal sector unemployment in urban areas of Bolivia," Other publications TiSEM 4b6b27c8-e099-40fd-bee4-3, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
  3. Eric A. Hanushek & Steven G. Rivkin & Lori L. Taylor, 1996. "Aggregation and the Estimated Effects of School Resources," NBER Working Papers 5548, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Hanushek, Eric A, 1992. "The Trade-Off between Child Quantity and Quality," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(1), pages 84-117, February.
  5. V. Joseph Hotz & Lixin Xu & Marta Tienda & Avner Ahituv, 1999. "Are There Returns to the Wages of Young Men from Working While in School?," JCPR Working Papers 101, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
  6. Donald Robertson & James Symons, 2003. "Do Peer Groups Matter? Peer Group versus Schooling Effects on Academic Attainment," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 70(277), pages 31-53, February.
  7. repec:sae:niesru:v:148:y::i:1:p:73-97 is not listed on IDEAS
  8. Ronald G. Ehrenberg & Daniel R. Sherman, 1987. "Employment While in College, Academic Achievement, and Postcollege Outcomes: A Summary of Results," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 22(1), pages 1-23.
  9. Micklewright, J & Mark Pearson & Stephen Smith, 1989. "Has Britain an early school-leaving problem?," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 10(1), pages 1-16, February.
  10. John Micklewright & Najma Rajah & Stephen Smith, 1994. "Labouring and Learning: Part-Time Work and Full-Time Education," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 148(1), pages 73-97, May.
  11. Dustmann, Christian & Rajah, Najma & van Soest, Arthur, 2002. "Class Size, Education, and Wages," IZA Discussion Papers 501, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  12. Becker, Gary S & Lewis, H Gregg, 1973. "On the Interaction between the Quantity and Quality of Children," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 81(2), pages S279-88, Part II, .
  13. Willis, Robert J, 1973. "A New Approach to the Economic Theory of Fertility Behavior," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 81(2), pages S14-64, Part II, .
  14. Griliches, Zvi, 1980. " Schooling Interruption, Work While in School and the Returns from Schooling," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 82(2), pages 291-303.
  15. Janet Currie & Duncan Thomas, 1999. "Early Test Scores, Socioeconomic Status and Future Outcomes," NBER Working Papers 6943, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  16. Behrman, Jere R & Taubman, Paul, 1986. "Birth Order, Schooling, and Earnings," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 4(3), pages S121-45, July.
  17. Robertson, D. & Symons, J., 1988. "The Occupational Choice Of British Children," Papers 325, London School of Economics - Centre for Labour Economics.
  18. Booth, Alison L & Satchell, Stephen E, 1994. "Apprenticeships and Job Tenure," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 46(4), pages 676-95, October.
  19. Light, Audrey, 2001. "In-School Work Experience and the Returns to Schooling," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 19(1), pages 65-93, January.
  20. Gary S. Becker, 1981. "A Treatise on the Family," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number beck81-1, September.
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