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Does student employment really impact academic achievement? The case of France

Author

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  • Kady Marie-Danielle Body
  • Liliane Bonnal
  • Jean-François Giret

Abstract

Student employment is usually thought to curb academic achievement. Our research relating to a survey at a French university in 2012 emphasizes the significance of the intensity of student working hours. Allowance for the endogeneity of student employment reinforces the negative effects, particularly for young people working more than 16 hours a week. However, the academic achievement of those working fewer than 8 hours per week seems unaffected. The type of employment also affects the chances of success: students with public sector jobs appear to be less prone to failure, possibly because of more flexible working hours.

Suggested Citation

  • Kady Marie-Danielle Body & Liliane Bonnal & Jean-François Giret, 2014. "Does student employment really impact academic achievement? The case of France," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(25), pages 3061-3073, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:46:y:2014:i:25:p:3061-3073
    DOI: 10.1080/00036846.2014.920483
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:ebl:ecbull:eb-17-00269 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Laurence Lizé & Géraldine Rieucau, 2016. "Travailler dans une même entreprise pendant et après ses études," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-01730581, HAL.
    3. Mila Staneva, 2015. "Studieren und Arbeiten: die Bedeutung der studentischen Erwerbstätigkeit für den Studienerfolg und den Übergang in den Arbeitsmarkt," DIW Roundup: Politik im Fokus 70, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    4. Neyt, Brecht & Omey, Eddy & Verhaest, Dieter & Baert, Stijn, 2017. "Does Student Work Really Affect Educational Outcomes? A Review of the Literature," GLO Discussion Paper Series 121, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    5. Laurence Lizé & Géraldine Rieucau, 2017. "Travailler pendant ses études et s'insérer dans la vie active : premières tendances et résultats, Générations 1998, 2004 et 2010," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-01730591, HAL.
    6. Sprietsma, Maresa, 2015. "Student employment: Advantage or handicap for academic achievement?," ZEW Discussion Papers 15-085, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.

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