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To Ask or Not To Ask? Bank Capital Requirements and Loan Collateralization

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Listed:
  • Degryse, Hans
  • Karapetyan, Artashes
  • Karmakar, Sudipto

Abstract

We study the impact of higher capital requirements on banks' decisions to grant collateralized rather than uncollateralized loans. We exploit the 2011 EBA capital exercise, a quasi-natural experiment that required a number of banks to increase their regulatory capital but not others. This experiment makes secured lending more attractive vis-à-vis unsecured lending for the affected banks as secured loans require less regulatory capital. Using a loan-level dataset covering all corporate loans in Portugal, we identify a novel channel of higher capital requirements: relative to the control group, treated banks require loans to be collateralized more often after the shock, but less so for relationship borrowers. This applies in particular for collateral that saves more on regulatory capital.

Suggested Citation

  • Degryse, Hans & Karapetyan, Artashes & Karmakar, Sudipto, 2018. "To Ask or Not To Ask? Bank Capital Requirements and Loan Collateralization," CEPR Discussion Papers 13331, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:13331
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Capital requirements; Collateral; Lending Technology; relationship lending;

    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • G32 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Financing Policy; Financial Risk and Risk Management; Capital and Ownership Structure; Value of Firms; Goodwill

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