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Identifying credit supply shocks with bank-firm data: methods and applications

Author

Listed:
  • Hans Degryse

    (KU Leuven, Halle Institute for Economic Research, and CEPR)

  • Olivier De Jonghe

    () (National Bank of Belgium and Tilburg University)

  • Sanja Jakovljevic

    () (Lancaster University)

  • Klaas Mulier

    (Ghent University and National Bank of Belgium)

  • Glenn Schepens

    () (European Central Bank)

Abstract

Current empirical methods to identify and assess the impact of bank credit supply shocks rely strictly on multi-bank firms and ignore firms borrowing from only one bank. Yet, these single-bank firms are often the majority of firms in an economy and most prone to credit supply shocks. We propose and underpin an alternative demand control (using industry-location-size-time fixed effects) that allows identifying timevarying cross-sectional bank credit supply shocks using both single- and multi-bank firms. Using matched bank-firm credit data from Belgium, we show that firms borrowing from banks with negative credit supply shocks exhibit lower financial debt growth, asset growth, investments, and operating margin growth. Positive credit supply shocks are associated with bank risk-taking behaviour at the extensive margin. Importantly, to capture these effects it is crucial to include the single-bank firms when identifying the bank credit supply shocks.

Suggested Citation

  • Hans Degryse & Olivier De Jonghe & Sanja Jakovljevic & Klaas Mulier & Glenn Schepens, 2018. "Identifying credit supply shocks with bank-firm data: methods and applications," Working Paper Research 347, National Bank of Belgium.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbb:reswpp:201810-347
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    File URL: https://www.nbb.be/doc/oc/repec/reswpp/wp347en.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Degryse, Hans & Karapetyan, Artashes & Karmakar, Sudipto, 2018. "To Ask or Not To Ask? Bank Capital Requirements and Loan Collateralization," CEPR Discussion Papers 13331, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Laurens Cherchye & Bram De Rock & Annalisa Ferrando & Klaas Mulier & Marijn Verschelde, 2018. "Identifying Financial Constraints from Production Data," Working Papers ECARES 2018-31, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    3. Tuuli, Saara, 2019. "Model-based regulation and firms' access to finance," Research Discussion Papers 4/2019, Bank of Finland.
    4. Olivier De Jonghe & Hans Dewachter & Klaas Mulier & Steven Ongena & Glenn Schepens, 2018. "Some borrowers are more equal than others: Bank funding shocks and credit reallocation," Working Paper Research 361, National Bank of Belgium.
    5. Hans Degryse & Artashes Karapetyan & Sudipto Karmakar, 2018. "To Ask or Not To Ask? Collateral versus Screening in Lending Relationships," Working Papers REM 2018/49, ISEG - Lisbon School of Economics and Management, REM, Universidade de Lisboa.
    6. Altavilla, Carlo & Boucinha, Miguel & Holton, Sarah & Ongena, Steven, 2018. "Credit supply and demand in unconventional times," Working Paper Series 2202, European Central Bank.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    credit supply identificationbank lendingcorporate investmentbank risk-taking;

    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G32 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Financing Policy; Financial Risk and Risk Management; Capital and Ownership Structure; Value of Firms; Goodwill

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