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Shock Propagation and Banking Structure

Author

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  • Giannetti, Mariassunta
  • Saidi, Farzad

Abstract

We conjecture that lenders' decisions to provide liquidity are affected by the extent to which they internalize negative spillovers. We show that lenders with a large share of loans outstanding in an industry provide liquidity to industries in distress when spillovers are expected to be strong, because fire sales are likely to ensue. Lenders with a large share of outstanding loans also provide liquidity to customers and suppliers of industries in distress, especially when the disruption of supply chains is expected to be costly. Our results suggest a novel channel explaining why credit concentration may favor financial stability.

Suggested Citation

  • Giannetti, Mariassunta & Saidi, Farzad, 2017. "Shock Propagation and Banking Structure," CEPR Discussion Papers 12423, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:12423
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Giannetti, Mariassunta & Laeven, Luc, 2012. "The flight home effect: Evidence from the syndicated loan market during financial crises," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 104(1), pages 23-43.
    2. Mariassunta Giannetti & Andrei Simonov, 2013. "On the Real Effects of Bank Bailouts: Micro Evidence from Japan," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 5(1), pages 135-167, January.
    3. Jean-Noël Barrot & Julien Sauvagnat, 2016. "Input Specificity and the Propagation of Idiosyncratic Shocks in Production Networks," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 131(3), pages 1543-1592.
    4. Tobias Berg & Anthony Saunders & Sascha Steffen, 2016. "The Total Cost of Corporate Borrowing in the Loan Market: Don't Ignore the Fees," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 71(3), pages 1357-1392, June.
    5. Acharya, Viral V. & Bharath, Sreedhar T. & Srinivasan, Anand, 2007. "Does industry-wide distress affect defaulted firms? Evidence from creditor recoveries," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 85(3), pages 787-821, September.
    6. Rajan, Raghuram G & Zingales, Luigi, 1995. " What Do We Know about Capital Structure? Some Evidence from International Data," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 50(5), pages 1421-1460, December.
    7. Viral V. Acharya & Iftekhar Hasan & Anthony Saunders, 2006. "Should Banks Be Diversified? Evidence from Individual Bank Loan Portfolios," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 79(3), pages 1355-1412, May.
    8. repec:bla:jfinan:v:72:y:2017:i:3:p:1081-1118 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Giovanni Favara & Mariassunta Giannetti, 2017. "Forced Asset Sales and the Concentration of Outstanding Debt: Evidence from the Mortgage Market," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 72(3), pages 1081-1118, June.
    10. Jacobson, Tor & von Schedvin, Erik, 2012. "Trade Credit and the Propagation of Corporate Failure: An Empirical Analysis," Working Paper Series 263, Sveriges Riksbank (Central Bank of Sweden).
    11. Frederic Boissay & Reint Gropp, 2013. "Payment Defaults and Interfirm Liquidity Provision," Review of Finance, European Finance Association, vol. 17(6), pages 1853-1894.
    12. Malmendier, Ulrike & Opp, Marcus M. & Saidi, Farzad, 2016. "Target revaluation after failed takeover attempts: Cash versus stock," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 119(1), pages 92-106.
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    Cited by:

    1. Hans Degryse & Olivier De Jonghe & Sanja Jakovljevic & Klaas Mulier & Glenn Schepens, 2018. "Identifying credit supply shocks with bank-firm data: methods and applications," Working Paper Research 347, National Bank of Belgium.
    2. Alfaro, Laura & García-Santana, Manuel & Moral-Benito, Enrique, 2018. "On the Direct and Indirect Real Effects of Credit Supply Shocks," CEPR Discussion Papers 12794, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Matías Lamas & Javier Mencía, 2018. "What drives sovereign debt portfolios of banks in a crisis context?," Working Papers 1843, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    bank concentration; externalities; fire sales; Supply Chains; syndicated loans;

    JEL classification:

    • E23 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Production
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • G20 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - General
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • L14 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Transactional Relationships; Contracts and Reputation

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