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Follow the Money: Does the Financial Sector Intermediate Natural Resource Windfalls?

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  • Thorsten Beck
  • Steven Poelhekke

Abstract

The need to absorb windfalls gains and manage them appropriately has been discussed extensively by academics and policy makers alike. We explore the role of the financial sector in intermediating these windfalls. Controlling for the level of financial development, inflation, GDP growth and country fixed-effects, we find a relative decline in financial sector deposits in countries that experience an unexpected natural resource windfall as measured by shocks to exogenous world prices. Moreover, we find a similar relative decline in lending, which is mostly due to the decrease in deposits. The smaller role for the financial sector in intermediating resource booms is accompanied by a stronger role of governments in channeling resources into the economy, mostly through higher government consumption.

Suggested Citation

  • Thorsten Beck & Steven Poelhekke, 2017. "Follow the Money: Does the Financial Sector Intermediate Natural Resource Windfalls?," CESifo Working Paper Series 6374, CESifo Group Munich.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_6374
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    Cited by:

    1. Jarrett, U. & Mohaddes, K. & Mohtadi, H., 2018. "Oil Price Volatility, Financial Institutions and Economic Growth," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1851, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    2. Littke, Helge C. N., 2018. "Channeling the iron ore super-cycle: The role of regional bank branch networks in emerging markets," IWH Discussion Papers 11/2018, Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    natural resources; financial development; banking;

    JEL classification:

    • E20 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics
    • G20 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - General
    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General
    • Q32 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - Exhaustible Resources and Economic Development
    • Q33 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - Resource Booms (Dutch Disease)

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