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Upward Social Mobility, Well-being and Political Preferences: Evidence from the BHPS

  • Andrew E. Clark
  • Emanuela D'Angelo

The paper uses 18 waves of BHPS data to provide evidence of the roles of both own social status and upward mobility relative to one's parents on job and life satisfaction, preferences for redistribution, pro-public sector attitudes and voting. Both own social status and greater mobility with respect to parents are positively associated with subjective well-being. However, this symmetric effect disappears for political preferences. While greater social status is associated with less favourable attitudes to redistribution and the public sector, greater upward mobility is associated with more Left-wing attitudes. These attitudes translate into actual reported voting behaviour. Upwards social mobility produces satisfied Left-wingers.

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File URL: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/dp1252.pdf
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Paper provided by Centre for Economic Performance, LSE in its series CEP Discussion Papers with number dp1252.

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Date of creation: Dec 2013
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Handle: RePEc:cep:cepdps:dp1252
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/publications/series.asp?prog=CEP

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