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Schooling and smoking among the baby boomers and evaluation of the impact of educational expansion in France

Post-war expansion of education in France transformed the distribution of schooling for the cohorts born between the 1940s and the 1970s. However, throughout this expansion the proportion with the highest levels of qualifications remained stable, providing a natural control group. We evaluate the impact of schooling on smoking, for the beneficiaries of the post-war expansion, by comparing changes in their outcomes across birth cohorts with changes within the control group. We uncover robust evidence that educational expansion contributed to a decline in smoking. Our results also suggest that tobacco control policies have reinforced the schooling-smoking gradient.

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Paper provided by HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York in its series Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers with number 10/02.

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Date of creation: Jan 2010
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Handle: RePEc:yor:hectdg:10/02
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Web page: http://www.york.ac.uk/economics/postgrad/herc/hedg/
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