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Schooling and smoking among the baby boomers and evaluation of the impact of educational expansion in France

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Abstract

Post-war expansion of education in France transformed the distribution of schooling for the cohorts born between the 1940s and the 1970s. However, throughout this expansion the proportion with the highest levels of qualifications remained stable, providing a natural control group. We evaluate the impact of schooling on smoking, for the beneficiaries of the post-war expansion, by comparing changes in their outcomes across birth cohorts with changes within the control group. We uncover robust evidence that educational expansion contributed to a decline in smoking. Our results also suggest that tobacco control policies have reinforced the schooling-smoking gradient.

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  • Jones, A.M & Etile, F, 2010. "Schooling and smoking among the baby boomers and evaluation of the impact of educational expansion in France," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 10/02, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
  • Handle: RePEc:yor:hectdg:10/02
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    Cited by:

    1. Damien Bricard & Florence Jusot & François Beck & Myriam Khlat & Stéphane Legleye, 2014. "L’évolution des inégalités sociales de tabagisme au cours du cycle de vie : une analyse selon la cohorte et le genre," Post-Print hal-01523920, HAL.
    2. Michael Grossman, 2015. "The Relationship between Health and Schooling: What's New?," Working Papers 8, City University of New York Graduate Center, Ph.D. Program in Economics.
    3. repec:dau:papers:123456789/9292 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Ana María Iregui-Bohórquez & Ligia Alba Melo-Becerra & María Teresa Ramírez-Giraldo, 2015. "Risky Health Behaviors: Evidence for an Emerging Economy," BORRADORES DE ECONOMIA 013040, BANCO DE LA REPÚBLICA.
    5. repec:eee:jhecon:v:57:y:2018:i:c:p:1-14 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. JAMES, Jonathan & VUJIC, Suncica, 2016. "From high school to the high chair: Education and fertility timing," Working Papers 2016005, University of Antwerp, Faculty of Applied Economics.
    7. James, Jonathan, 2015. "Health and education expansion," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 193-215.
    8. Bruce Hollingsworth & Anthony Scott & Sandy Tubeuf & Florence Jusot & Damien Bricard, 2012. "Mediating Role Of Education And Lifestyles In The Relationship Between Early‐Life Conditions And Health: Evidence From The 1958 British Cohort," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21, pages 129-150, June.
    9. Jared C. Carbone & Snorre Kverndokk, 2017. "Individual Investments in Education and Health: Policy Responses and Interactions," Advances in Health Economics and Health Services Research,in: Human Capital and Health Behavior, volume 25, pages 33-83 Emerald Publishing Ltd.
    10. repec:dau:papers:123456789/14335 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Liu, Sze Yan & Buka, Stephen L. & Kubzansky, Laura D. & Kawachi, Ichiro & Gilman, Stephen E. & Loucks, Eric B., 2013. "Sheepskin effects of education in the 10-year Framingham risk of coronary heart disease," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 80(C), pages 31-36.
    12. Titus J. Galama & Adriana Lleras-Muney & Hans van Kippersluis, 2018. "The Effect of Education on Health and Mortality: A Review of Experimental and Quasi-Experimental Evidence," NBER Working Papers 24225, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Heckley, Gawain & Nordin, Martin & Gerdtham, Ulf-G., 2018. "Could Easier Access to University Improve Health and Reduce Health Inequalities?," Working Papers 2018:5, Lund University, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Smoking; Education; Duration Analysis; France;

    JEL classification:

    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • D82 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Asymmetric and Private Information; Mechanism Design
    • L14 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Transactional Relationships; Contracts and Reputation

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