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Milieu d’origine, situation sociale et parcours tabagique en France

Author

Listed:
  • Damien Bricard

    () (LEDa - Laboratoire d'Economie de Dauphine - IRD - Institut de Recherche pour le Développement - Université Paris-Dauphine - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Florence Jusot

    (LEDa - Laboratoire d'Economie de Dauphine - IRD - Institut de Recherche pour le Développement - Université Paris-Dauphine - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

Abstract

This article explores the influence of social background and social situation on the smoking career. This study is based on a sample of 4.473 individuals who answered the 2006 French Health, Health Care and Insurance Survey. The results of a non-parametric analysis and of a stratified Cox model show an increase of the risk of initiation and a decrease of the risk of cessation with parental smoking. They also emphasis a reversion of the social gradient between initiation and cessation. Individuals with high social background and high socioeconomic status have both a higher risk of initiation and a higher risk of cessation. Finally, being son of farmers is protective for both initiation and cessation.

Suggested Citation

  • Damien Bricard & Florence Jusot, 2012. "Milieu d’origine, situation sociale et parcours tabagique en France," Post-Print hal-01593798, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:hal-01593798
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01593798
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Etilé, Fabrice & Jones, Andrew M., 2011. "Schooling and smoking among the baby boomers - An evaluation of the impact of educational expansion in France," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 811-831, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Damien Bricard & Florence Jusot & François Beck & Myriam Khlat & Stéphane Legleye, 2014. "L’évolution des inégalités sociales de tabagisme au cours du cycle de vie : une analyse selon la cohorte et le genre," Post-Print hal-01523920, HAL.
    2. Damien Bricard & Florence Jusot & François Beck & Myriam Khlat & Stéphane Legleye, 2016. "Educational inequalities in smoking over the life cycle: an analysis by cohort and gender," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 61(1), pages 101-109, January.
    3. Damien Bricard & Florence Jusot & François Beck & Myriam Khlat & Stéphane Legleye, 2016. "Educational inequalities in smoking over the life cycle: an analysis by cohort and gender," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 61(1), pages 101-109, January.

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