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Love Conquers All but Nicotine : Spousal Peer Effects on the Decision to Quit Smoking

Listed author(s):
  • Palali, Ali

    (Tilburg University, Center For Economic Research)

  • van Ours, Jan

    (Tilburg University, Center For Economic Research)

If two partners smoke, their quit behavior may be related through correlation in un- observed individual characteristics and common external shocks. However, there may also be a causal effect whereby the quit behavior of one partner is affected by the quit decision of the other partner. We use data on Dutch partnered individuals to study the relevance of such spousal peer effects. After controlling for common unobserved heterogeneity and common external shocks, we find that such spousal peer effects in the decision to quit smoking do not exist. Apparently, love conquers all but nicotine addiction.

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File URL: https://pure.uvt.nl/portal/files/8186832/2015_048.pdf
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Paper provided by Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research in its series Discussion Paper with number 2015-048.

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Date of creation: 2015
Handle: RePEc:tiu:tiucen:f6c6cf33-30b0-404c-ad76-7be3d884de65
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://center.uvt.nl

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