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Spousal Effects in Smoking Cessation: Matching, Learning, or Bargaining?

  • Kerry Anne McGeary
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    Previous research studying the correlation in smoking behavior between spouses has discounted the role of bargaining or learning. Using the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), which contains information on smoking cessation and spouse's preferences, this paper presents an essential investigation of the importance of spousal bargaining or learning on the decision to cease smoking. We find, regardless of gender, when one member of couple ceases smoking this induces the other member to cease smoking through bargaining. Further, we find females demonstrate either altruistic behavior toward a spouse, who has suffered a health shock, or learning from their spouse's health shock.

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    File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w19274.pdf
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    Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 19274.

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    Date of creation: Aug 2013
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    Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:19274
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