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Income Contingent Student Loans for Thailand: Alternatives Compared

  • Bruce Chapman
  • Kiatanantha Lounkaew

This paper illustrates the extent of implicit taxpayer subsidies under four possible income contingent loan (ICL) arrangements for Thailand: TICAL, implemented in 2007 only, a variant of TICAL, and two alternative ICL schemes. The implicit taxpayer subsidy calculated with respect to average graduate earnings for TICAL-type arrangements is between 25-40 per cent; however, the average implicit subsidies for the two alternatives are close to zero. When account is taken of disaggregated graduate earnings, the subsidies for TICALtype schemes increase to about 30-55 per cent. The subsidy is between 3-18 per cent for our alternative ICLs, depending on the form of the real rate of interest incurred. These results show that there is a viable ICL alternative to TICAL, which are of greatest benefit for low levels of debt. When the debt is relatively large the subsidies of even well designed schemes can be as high as 50 per cent.

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File URL: http://cbe.anu.edu.au/researchpapers/cepr/DP595.pdf
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Paper provided by Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 595.

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Date of creation: Jan 2009
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Handle: RePEc:auu:dpaper:595
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  1. Carneiro, Pedro & Heckman, James J., 2002. "The Evidence on Credit Constraints in Post-Secondary Schooling," IZA Discussion Papers 518, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Psacharopoulos, George & Patrinos, Harry Anthony, 2002. "Returns to investment in education : a further update," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2881, The World Bank.
  3. Bruce Chapman & Andrew Leigh, 2006. "Do Very High Tax Rates Induce Bunching? Implications for the Design of Income-Contingent Loan Schemes," CEPR Discussion Papers 521, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
  4. Dynarski, Mark, 1994. "Who defaults on student loans? Findings from the National Postsecondary Student Aid Study," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 55-68, March.
  5. L. G. Hines, 1955. "Economics and the Public Interest," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 31(2), pages 108-119.
  6. Bruce Chapman & Kiatanantha Lounkaew & Piruna Polsiri & Rangsit Sarachitti & Thitima Sitthipongpanich, 2009. "Thailand’s Student Loan Fund: An Analysis of Interest Rate Subsidies and Repayment Hardships," CEPR Discussion Papers 592, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
  7. Johnstone, D. Bruce, 2004. "The economics and politics of cost sharing in higher education: comparative perspectives," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 403-410, August.
  8. Bruce Chapman, 2005. "Income Contingent Loans for Higher Education: International Reform," CEPR Discussion Papers 491, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
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