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Student Loan Reforms for German Higher Education: Financing Tuition Fees

  • Chapman, Bruce

    ()

    (Australian National University)

  • Sinning, Mathias

    ()

    (Australian National University)

It is generally agreed that the funding base for German universities is inadequate and perhaps the time has come for serious consideration of the imposition of non-trivial tuition charges. Against this background, this paper compares conventional and income contingent loans for financing tuition fees at German universities. With the use of unconditional age-income quantile regression approaches our analysis considers two critical aspects of the loan debate: the size of repayment burdens associated with normal mortgage-style loans, and the time structure of revenue to the government from a hypothetical income contingent loan scheme. It is found tuition fees at German universities could increase considerably with the use of an income contingent loan system based on current policy approaches used in Australia, England and New Zealand.

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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 5532.

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Length: 34 pages
Date of creation: Feb 2011
Date of revision:
Publication status: published in: Education Economics, 2012, [Online First]
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp5532
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  1. Pedro Carneiro & James J. Heckman, 2002. "The Evidence on Credit Constraints in Post-Secondary Schooling," NBER Working Papers 9055, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Chapman, B., 1996. "Conceptual Issues and the Australian Experience with Income Contingent Charges for Higher Education," CEPR Discussion Papers 350, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
  3. Rothstein, Jesse & Rouse, Cecilia Elena, 2011. "Constrained after college: Student loans and early-career occupational choices," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(1), pages 149-163.
  4. Chapman, Bruce & Lounkaew, Kiatanantha & Polsiri, Piruna & Sarachitti, Rangsit & Sitthipongpanich, Thitima, 2010. "Thailand's Student Loans Fund: Interest rate subsidies and repayment burdens," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 685-694, October.
  5. Bruce Chapman & Kiatanantha Lounkaew, 2008. "Income Contingent Student Loans for Thailand : Alternatives Compared," EABER Working Papers 21950, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
  6. Sergio Firpo & Nicole M. Fortin & Thomas Lemieux, 2007. "Unconditional Quantile Regressions," NBER Technical Working Papers 0339, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Bruce Chapman & Andrew Leigh, 2009. "Do Very High Tax Rates Induce Bunching? Implications for the Design of Income Contingent Loan Schemes," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 85(270), pages 276-289, 09.
  8. Bruce Chapman & Kiatanantha Lounkaewa, 2010. "Repayment Burdens with US College Loans," CEPR Discussion Papers 647, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
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