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Student Loan Reforms for German Higher Education: Financing Tuition Fees

  • Bruce Chapman
  • Mathias Sinning

Due to the unknown future economic situation of students, private banks are unwilling to provide student loans in the absence of collateral. This market failure requires government intervention to prevent socially sub-optimal and regressive outcomes. Income contingent loans, whose repayment depends on the borrowers' future capacity to pay, can offer a possible solution to this problem. In this paper, we compare alternative income contingent loans for financing tuition fees at German universities. Several German states have introduced tuition fees at their universities since summer 2007 and publicly owned banks have started to offer student loans to cover these fees. Our empirical findings highlight the benefits of income contingent loans and demonstrate that tuition fees at German universities could increase considerably if an income contingent loan system would be implemented to provide students with the financial resources they need to pay these fees.

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Paper provided by Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 646.

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Date of creation: Nov 2010
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Handle: RePEc:auu:dpaper:646
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  1. Jesse Rothstein & Cecilia Elena Rouse, 2007. "Constrained After College: Student Loans and Early Career Occupational Choices," Working Papers 18, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Education Research Section..
  2. Bruce Chapman & Andrew Leigh, 2006. "Do Very High Tax Rates Induce Bunching? Implications for the Design of Income-Contingent Loan Schemes," CEPR Discussion Papers 521, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
  3. Sergio Firpo & Nicole M. Fortin & Thomas Lemieux, 2009. "Unconditional Quantile Regressions," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 77(3), pages 953-973, 05.
  4. Bruce Chapman & Kiatanantha Lounkaew, 2008. "Income Contingent Student Loans for Thailand : Alternatives Compared," EABER Working Papers 21950, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
  5. Bruce Chapman & Kiatanantha Lounkaewa, 2010. "Repayment Burdens with US College Loans," CEPR Discussion Papers 647, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
  6. Chapman, Bruce & Lounkaew, Kiatanantha & Polsiri, Piruna & Sarachitti, Rangsit & Sitthipongpanich, Thitima, 2010. "Thailand's Student Loans Fund: Interest rate subsidies and repayment burdens," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 685-694, October.
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