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Repayment Burdens with US College Loans

Author

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  • Bruce Chapman
  • Kiatanantha Lounkaewa

Abstract

There is a significant and on-going unease with, and debate concerning, the state of US college loans. One of the most important questions relates to so-called “repayment burdens”, the financial difficulties associated with repayments. This paper examines the issue from both theoretical and empirical perspectives, the major goal being to understand the interaction between loan design and occupational choices. We find compelling original evidence that the design of US loans imposes severe expected hardships for many borrowers, especially those with very high debts, such as lawyers. The case for policy reform towards graduates’ capacity to repay seems incontestable.

Suggested Citation

  • Bruce Chapman & Kiatanantha Lounkaewa, 2010. "Repayment Burdens with US College Loans," CEPR Discussion Papers 647, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
  • Handle: RePEc:auu:dpaper:647
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    File URL: https://www.cbe.anu.edu.au/researchpapers/cepr/DP647.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Barr, Nicholas, 2003. "Financing higher education: lessons from the UK debate," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 287, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. Migali, Giuseppe, 2012. "Funding higher education and wage uncertainty: Income contingent loan versus mortgage loan," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(6), pages 871-889.
    3. McDonald, James B, 1984. "Some Generalized Functions for the Size Distribution of Income," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 52(3), pages 647-663, May.
    4. Rothstein, Jesse & Rouse, Cecilia Elena, 2011. "Constrained after college: Student loans and early-career occupational choices," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(1-2), pages 149-163, February.
    5. Joop Hartog & Luis Díaz-Serrano, 2007. "Earnings risk and demand for higher education: A cross-section test for Spain," Journal of Applied Economics, Universidad del CEMA, vol. 10, pages 1-28, May.
    6. Lawrance, Emily C, 1995. "Consumer Default and the Life Cycle Model," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 27(4), pages 939-954, November.
    7. Schwartz, S. & Finnie, R., 2002. "Student loans in Canada: an analysis of borrowing and repayment," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(5), pages 497-512, October.
    8. Chapman, Bruce & Lounkaew, Kiatanantha & Polsiri, Piruna & Sarachitti, Rangsit & Sitthipongpanich, Thitima, 2010. "Thailand's Student Loans Fund: Interest rate subsidies and repayment burdens," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 685-694, October.
    9. Chapman, Bruce & Lounkaew, Kiatanantha, 2010. "Income contingent student loans for Thailand: Alternatives compared," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 695-709, October.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Chapman, Bruce & Liu, Amy Y.C., 2013. "Repayment burdens of student loans for Vietnamese higher education," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 298-308.
    2. repec:zbw:rwirep:0244 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Bruce Chapman & Mathias Sinning, 2014. "Student loan reforms for German higher education: financing tuition fees," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(6), pages 569-588, December.
    4. Bruce Chapman & Mathias Sinning, 2011. "Student Loan Reforms for German Higher Education: Financing Tuition Fees," Ruhr Economic Papers 0244, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I22 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Educational Finance; Financial Aid
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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