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Optimal student loans and graduate tax under moral hazard and adverse selection

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  • Robert J. Gary-Bobo
  • Alain Trannoy

Abstract

type="main"> We characterize the set of second-best “menus” of student-loan contracts in an economy with risky labor-market outcomes, adverse selection, moral hazard, and risk aversion. We combine student loans with optimal income taxation. Second-best optima provide incomplete insurance because of moral hazard. Optimal repayments must be income contingent, or the income tax must comprise a graduate tax. Individuals are ex ante unequal because of differing probabilities of success, and ex post unequal, because taxation trades off incentives and redistribution. In addition, second-best optima exhibit an interim equalization property: the poststudy but prework expected utilities of newly graduated student types must be equal.

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  • Robert J. Gary-Bobo & Alain Trannoy, 2015. "Optimal student loans and graduate tax under moral hazard and adverse selection," RAND Journal of Economics, RAND Corporation, vol. 46(3), pages 546-576, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:randje:v:46:y:2015:i:3:p:546-576
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    Cited by:

    1. Meunier Guy & Ponssard Jean-Pierre, 2017. "Financing innovative green projects with asymmetric information and costly public funds," Working Papers 2017-55, Center for Research in Economics and Statistics.
    2. Winfried Koeniger & Julien Prat, 2018. "Human Capital and Optimal Redistribution," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 27, pages 1-26, January.
    3. Lochner, Lance & Monge-Naranjo, Alexander, 2014. "Student Loans and Repayment: Theory, Evidence and Policy," Working Papers 2014-40, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, revised 12 Nov 2014.
    4. Higgins, Tim & Sinning, Mathias, 2013. "Modeling income dynamics for public policy design: An application to income contingent student loans," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 273-285.
    5. Findeisen, Sebastian & Sachs, Dominik, 2016. "Education and optimal dynamic taxation: The role of income-contingent student loans," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 138(C), pages 1-21.
    6. James C. Cox & Daniel Kreisman & Susan Dynarski, 2018. "Designed to Fail: Effects of the Default Option and Information Complexity on Student Loan Repayment," Experimental Economics Center Working Paper Series 2018-04, Experimental Economics Center, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D82 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Asymmetric and Private Information; Mechanism Design
    • H21 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Efficiency; Optimal Taxation
    • I22 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Educational Finance; Financial Aid
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality

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