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Economic Implications of Business Dynamics for KE-Associated Economic Growth and Inclusive Development in African Countries

Author

Listed:
  • Simplice Asongu

    () (Yaoundé/Cameroun)

  • Voxi Amavilah

    () (Phoenix AZ, USA)

  • Antonio Andrés

    () (Madrid, Spain)

Abstract

This paper develops an empirically-relevant framework (a) to examine whether or not the African business environment hinders or promotes the knowledge economy (KE), (b) to determine how the KE which emerges from such an environment affects economic growth, and (c) how growth in turn relates to the ‘inclusive development’ of 53 African countries during the 1996-2010 time period. The framework provides a modest guide to policymaking about, and further research into, such relationships. We implement the framework by building a three-stage model and rationalizing it as five interrelated hypotheses. To allow greater concentration on the issues that are themselves already complex, our model is very simple, but clear. For example, we make neither an attempt to evaluate causality nor to test for it, even though we suspect the links to be multi-directional – opportunity costs are everywhere. Instead we focus on fundamental relationships between the dynamics of starting business and doing business as expressed in the state of KE, and through it to the inclusive development via the economic growth of those countries. Estimation results indicate that the dynamics of starting and doing business explain strongly a large part of variations in KE. The link between KE and economic growth exists, but it is weak, and we provide plausible reasons for such a result. Despite the weak association between KE and economic growth, KE-influenced growth plays a very important role in inclusive development. In fact, growth of this kind has stronger effects on inclusive development and by implication on poverty reduction, than some of conventional controls in this study such as FDI, foreign aid, and even private investment. There is clearly room for further research to improve the results, but just as clearly practical policy is best served by not neglecting the relationships examined in this paper.

Suggested Citation

  • Simplice Asongu & Voxi Amavilah & Antonio Andrés, 2014. "Economic Implications of Business Dynamics for KE-Associated Economic Growth and Inclusive Development in African Countries," Working Papers of the African Governance and Development Institute. 14/023, African Governance and Development Institute..
  • Handle: RePEc:agd:wpaper:14/023
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Cited by:

    1. Simplice A. Asongu & Oasis Kodila†Tedika, 2017. "Is Poverty in the African DNA (Gene)?," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 85(4), pages 533-552, December.
    2. Simplice A. Asongu & Jacinta C. Nwachukwu, 2017. "Openness, ICT and Entrepreneurship in Sub-Saharan Africa," Research Africa Network Working Papers 17/032, Research Africa Network (RAN).
    3. Asongu, Simplice, 2015. "Rational Asymmetric Development: Transfer Pricing and Sub-Saharan Africa’s Extreme Poverty Tragedy," MPRA Paper 67854, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Business Dynamics; Knowledge Economy; Development; Africa;

    JEL classification:

    • L59 - Industrial Organization - - Regulation and Industrial Policy - - - Other
    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General
    • O30 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - General
    • O20 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - General
    • O55 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Africa

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