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Nicolas Van de Sijpe

Personal Details

First Name:Nicolas
Middle Name:
Last Name:Van de Sijpe
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pva211
http://sites.google.com/site/nicolasvandesijpe/
Department of Economics The University of Sheffield 9 Mappin Street Sheffield S1 4DT UK
Twitter: @nicvdsijpe
Terminal Degree:2010 Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE); Department of Economics; Oxford University (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

(99%) Department of Economics
University of Sheffield

Sheffield, United Kingdom
http://www.shef.ac.uk/economics/

: +44 114 222 3399
+ 44 (0)114 222 3458
9 Mappin Street, SHEFFIELD, S1 4DT
RePEc:edi:desheuk (more details at EDIRC)

(1%) Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE)
Department of Economics
Oxford University

Oxford, United Kingdom
http://www.csae.ox.ac.uk/

: +44-(0)1865 271084
+44-(0)1865 281447
Manor Road, Oxford, OX1 3UQ
RePEc:edi:csaoxuk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Jonathan R. W. Temple & Nicolas Van de Sijpe, 2014. "Foreign Aid and Domestic Absorption," CSAE Working Paper Series 2014-01, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  2. Nicolas Van de Sijpe, 2013. "The fungibility of health aid reconsidered," CSAE Working Paper Series 2013-10, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  3. Nicolas Van de Sijpe, 2010. "Is foreign aid fungible? Evidence from the education and health sectors," CSAE Working Paper Series 2010-38, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  4. N. Van De Sijpe & G. Rayp, 2004. "Measuring and Explaining Government Inefficiency in Developing Countries," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 04/266, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.

Articles

  1. Temple, Jonathan & Van de Sijpe, Nicolas, 2017. "Foreign aid and domestic absorption," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 431-443.
  2. Nicolas Van de Sijpe, 2013. "Is Foreign Aid Fungible? Evidence from the Education and Health Sectors," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 27(2), pages 320-356.
  3. Nicolas Van de Sijpe, 2013. "The Fungibility of Health Aid Reconsidered," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(12), pages 1746-1754, December.
  4. Nicolas Van de Sijpe, 2013. "The Fungibility of Health Aid Reconsidered: A Rejoinder," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(12), pages 1763-1764, December.
  5. Glenn Rayp & Nicolas Van De Sijpe, 2007. "Measuring and explaining government efficiency in developing countries," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(2), pages 360-381.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Wikipedia mentions

(Only mentions on Wikipedia that link back to a page on a RePEc service)
  1. Nicolas Van de Sijpe, 2013. "The Fungibility of Health Aid Reconsidered," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(12), pages 1746-1754, December.

    Mentioned in:

    1. The fungibility of health aid reconsidered (JDS 2013) in ReplicationWiki ()

Working papers

  1. Jonathan R. W. Temple & Nicolas Van de Sijpe, 2014. "Foreign Aid and Domestic Absorption," CSAE Working Paper Series 2014-01, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.

    Cited by:

    1. Axel Dreher & Sarah Langlotz, 2015. "Aid and Growth. New Evidence Using an Excludable Instrument," CESifo Working Paper Series 5515, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Jonathan R. W. Temple & Nicolas Van de Sijpe, 2014. "Foreign Aid and Domestic Absorption," CSAE Working Paper Series 2014-01, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    3. Fischer, A.M., 2017. "Dilemmas of externally financing domestic expenditures: Rethinking the political economy of aid and social protection through the monetary transformation dilemma," ISS Working Papers - General Series 629, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.
    4. Abrams M.E. Tagem, 2017. "The economics and politics of foreign aid and domestic revenue," WIDER Working Paper Series 180, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    5. Galiani, Sebastian & Knack, Stephen & Xu, Lixin Colin & Zou, Ben, 2014. "The effect of aid on growth : evidence from a quasi-experiment," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6865, The World Bank.
    6. Jonathan Temple & Huikang Ying & Patrick Carter, 2014. "Transfers and Transformations: Remittances, Foreign Aid, and Growth," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 14/649, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK, revised 02 Dec 2014.
    7. Carter, Patrick, 2017. "Aid econometrics: Lessons from a stochastic growth model," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 216-232.
    8. Lionel Roger, 2015. "Foreign Aid, Poor Data, and the Fragility of Macroeconomic Inference," Discussion Papers 2015-06, University of Nottingham, CREDIT.
    9. Kruse, Hendrik W. & Martínez-Zarzoso, Inma, 2016. "Transfers in the gravity equation: The case of foreign aid," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 288, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    10. Fischer, A.M., 2016. "Aid and the symbiosis of global redistribution and development: Comparative historical lessons from two icons of development studies," ISS Working Papers - General Series 618, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.
    11. Abrams M E Tagem, 2017. "Aid, Taxes and Government Spending: A Heterogeneous Cointegrated Panel Analysis," Discussion Papers 2017-02, University of Nottingham, CREDIT.

  2. Nicolas Van de Sijpe, 2013. "The fungibility of health aid reconsidered," CSAE Working Paper Series 2013-10, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.

    Cited by:

    1. Łukasz Marć, 2017. "The Impact of Aid on Total Government Expenditures: New Evidence on Fungibility," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 21(3), pages 627-663, August.
    2. Langlotz, Sarah & Potrafke, Niklas, 2016. "Does development aid increase military expenditure?," Working Papers 0618, University of Heidelberg, Department of Economics.
    3. Morrissey, Oliver, 2015. "Aid and Government Fiscal Behavior: Assessing Recent Evidence," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 98-105.
    4. Morton, Alec & Arulselvan, Ashwin & Thomas, Ranjeeta, 2018. "Allocation rules for global donors," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 67-75.

  3. Nicolas Van de Sijpe, 2010. "Is foreign aid fungible? Evidence from the education and health sectors," CSAE Working Paper Series 2010-38, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.

    Cited by:

    1. Jonathan R. W. Temple & Nicolas Van de Sijpe, 2014. "Foreign Aid and Domestic Absorption," CSAE Working Paper Series 2014-01, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    2. Dreher, Axel & Langlotz, Sarah & Marchesi, Silvia, 2016. "Information transmission and ownership consolidation in aid programs," CEPR Discussion Papers 11443, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Patrick Guillaumont & Laurent Wagner, 2014. "Aid effectiveness for poverty reduction: lessons from cross-country analyses, with a special focus on vulnerable countries," Post-Print halshs-01112609, HAL.
    4. Dreher, Axel & Lohmann, Steffen, 2015. "Aid and Growth at the Regional Level," CEPR Discussion Papers 10561, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Fuchs, Andreas & Dreher, Axel & Hodler, Roland & Parks, Bradley C. & Raschky, Paul, 2015. "Aid on Demand: African Leaders and the Geography of China s Foreign Assistance," Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 112838, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    6. d’Aiglepierre, Rohen & Wagner, Laurent, 2013. "Aid and Universal Primary Education," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 95-112.
    7. Łukasz Marć, 2017. "The Impact of Aid on Total Government Expenditures: New Evidence on Fungibility," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 21(3), pages 627-663, August.
    8. Maiga, Eugenie W.H., 2014. "Does foreign aid in education foster gender equality in developing countries?," WIDER Working Paper Series 048, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    9. Ssozi, John & Amlani, Shirin, 2015. "The Effectiveness of Health Expenditure on the Proximate and Ultimate Goals of Healthcare in Sub-Saharan Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 165-179.
    10. Dreher, Axel & Fuchs, Andreas & Langlotz, Sarah, 2018. "The Effects of Foreign Aid on Refugee Flows," CEPR Discussion Papers 12741, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    11. Martínez Álvarez, Melisa & Borghi, Josephine & Acharya, Arnab & Vassall, Anna, 2016. "Is Development Assistance for Health fungible? Findings from a mixed methods case study in Tanzania," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 159(C), pages 161-169.
    12. Langlotz, Sarah & Potrafke, Niklas, 2016. "Does development aid increase military expenditure?," Working Papers 0618, University of Heidelberg, Department of Economics.
    13. Aaron Batten, 2011. "Aid and Oil in Papua New Guinea: Implications for the Financing of Service Delivery," Development Policy Centre Discussion Papers 1104, Development Policy Centre, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    14. Aaron Batten, 2009. "How much foreign aid given to PNG has stayed within the sectors to which it has been allocated and how much has it allowed the PNG Government to free up its own resources for other spending priorities," International and Development Economics Working Papers idec09-05, International and Development Economics.
    15. Morrissey, Oliver, 2015. "Aid and Government Fiscal Behavior: Assessing Recent Evidence," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 98-105.
    16. Nicolas Van de Sijpe, 2013. "The fungibility of health aid reconsidered," CSAE Working Paper Series 2013-10, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    17. Cockx, Lara & Francken, Nathalie, 2016. "Natural resources: A curse on education spending?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 394-408.
    18. Amanda Murdie, 2014. "Scrambling for contact: The determinants of inter-NGO cooperation in non-Western countries," The Review of International Organizations, Springer, vol. 9(3), pages 309-331, September.
    19. Abrams M E Tagem, 2017. "Aid, Taxes and Government Spending: A Heterogeneous Cointegrated Panel Analysis," Discussion Papers 2017-02, University of Nottingham, CREDIT.
    20. Zenthöfer, A.F., 2013. "Essays on development economics," Other publications TiSEM 356d10eb-9dfe-44c4-a270-6, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    21. Jean-Louis Combes & Rasmané Ouedraogo & Sampawende J Tapsoba, 2016. "What Does Aid Do to Fiscal Policy? New Evidence," IMF Working Papers 16/112, International Monetary Fund.

  4. N. Van De Sijpe & G. Rayp, 2004. "Measuring and Explaining Government Inefficiency in Developing Countries," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 04/266, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.

    Cited by:

    1. James Alm & Denvil Duncan, 2014. "Estimating Tax Agency Efficiency," Public Budgeting & Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 34(3), pages 92-110, September.
    2. Adam, Antonis & Delis, Manthos D & Kammas, Pantelis, 2012. "Fiscal decentralization and public sector efficiency: Evidence from OECD countries," MPRA Paper 36889, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Dobdinga C. Fonchamnyo & Molem C. Sama, 2016. "Determinants of public spending efficiency in education and health: evidence from selected CEMAC countries," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 40(1), pages 199-210, January.
    4. Eric Wang & Eskander Alvi, 2011. "Relative Efficiency of Government Spending and Its Determinants: Evidence from East Asian Countries," Eurasian Economic Review, Springer;Eurasia Business and Economics Society, vol. 1(1), pages 3-28, June.
    5. Dobdinga Fonchamnyo & Molem Sama, 2016. "Determinants of public spending efficiency in education and health: evidence from selected CEMAC countries," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 40(1), pages 199-210, January.
    6. Sok-Gee Chan Mohd & Zaini Abd Karim, 2012. "Public Spending Efficiency And Political And Economic Factors: Evidence From Selected East Asian Countries," Economic Annals, Faculty of Economics, University of Belgrade, vol. 57(193), pages 7-24, April- Ju.
    7. Ribeiro, Marcio Bruno, 2008. "Eficiência do gasto público na América Latina: uma análise comparativa a partir do modelo semi-paramétrico com estimativa em dois estágios," Gestión Pública 67, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL).
    8. Rouselle Lavado & Emilyn Cabanda, 2009. "The efficiency of health and education expenditures in the Philippines," Central European Journal of Operations Research, Springer;Slovak Society for Operations Research;Hungarian Operational Research Society;Czech Society for Operations Research;Österr. Gesellschaft für Operations Research (ÖGOR);Slovenian Society Informatika - Section for Operational Research;Croatian Operational Research Society, vol. 17(3), pages 275-291, September.
    9. Riadh Brini & Hatem Jemmali, 2015. "Public Spending Efficiency, Governance, and Political and Economic Policies: is there a Substantial Casual Relation? Evidence from Selected MENA Countries," Working Papers 947, Economic Research Forum, revised Sep 2015.
    10. Djedje Hermann YOHOU, 2015. "In Search of Fiscal Space in Africa: The Role of the Quality of Government Spending," Working Papers 201527, CERDI.
    11. Antonis Adam & Manthos Delis & Pantelis Kammas, 2011. "Public sector efficiency: leveling the playing field between OECD countries," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 146(1), pages 163-183, January.
    12. Aleksander Aristovnik, 2011. "The relative efficiency of education and R&D expenditures in the new EU member states," Journal of Business Economics and Management, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(5), pages 832-848, August.

Articles

  1. Temple, Jonathan & Van de Sijpe, Nicolas, 2017. "Foreign aid and domestic absorption," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 431-443.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Nicolas Van de Sijpe, 2013. "Is Foreign Aid Fungible? Evidence from the Education and Health Sectors," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 27(2), pages 320-356.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Nicolas Van de Sijpe, 2013. "The Fungibility of Health Aid Reconsidered," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(12), pages 1746-1754, December.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  4. Nicolas Van de Sijpe, 2013. "The Fungibility of Health Aid Reconsidered: A Rejoinder," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(12), pages 1763-1764, December.

    Cited by:

    1. Łukasz Marć, 2017. "The Impact of Aid on Total Government Expenditures: New Evidence on Fungibility," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 21(3), pages 627-663, August.
    2. Morrissey, Oliver, 2015. "Aid and Government Fiscal Behavior: Assessing Recent Evidence," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 98-105.
    3. Morton, Alec & Arulselvan, Ashwin & Thomas, Ranjeeta, 2018. "Allocation rules for global donors," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 67-75.

  5. Glenn Rayp & Nicolas Van De Sijpe, 2007. "Measuring and explaining government efficiency in developing countries," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(2), pages 360-381.
    See citations under working paper version above.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 9 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (4) 2010-12-18 2011-02-19 2013-02-03 2013-07-05
  2. NEP-DEV: Development (3) 2004-11-22 2006-08-05 2013-02-03
  3. NEP-AFR: Africa (1) 2006-08-05
  4. NEP-CIS: Confederation of Independent States (1) 2011-02-19
  5. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (1) 2013-07-05
  6. NEP-PBE: Public Economics (1) 2006-08-05

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