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Tess M. Stafford

Personal Details

First Name:Tess
Middle Name:M.
Last Name:Stafford
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pst504
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
http://www.asb.unsw.edu.au/schools/Pages/TessStafford.aspx
Terminal Degree:2010 Department of Economics; University of Texas-Austin (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

School of Economics
UNSW Business School
UNSW Sydney

Sydney, Australia
http://www.economics.unsw.edu.au/
RePEc:edi:senswau (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Scott French & Tess Stafford, 2017. "Returns to Experience and the Elasticity of Labor Supply," Discussion Papers 2017-15, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.
  2. Tess Stafford, 2013. "Indoor Air Quality and Academic Performance," Discussion Papers 2013-25, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.
  3. Stafford, Tess, 2012. "Ignoring the Multi-species Aspect of Labor Supply Decisions in Spatially Explicit Bio-economic Fishery Models," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 124367, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  4. Stafford, Tess, 2012. "Labor Supply of Fishermen: An Empirical Analysis," 2012 Conference (56th), February 7-10, 2012, Fremantle, Australia 124450, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
  5. Stafford, Tess, 2011. "Ignoring the Multi-species Aspect of Labor Supply Decisions in Spatial Bio-economic Fishery Models," 2011 Conference (55th), February 8-11, 2011, Melbourne, Australia 100714, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.

Articles

  1. Stafford, Tess M., 2018. "Accounting for outside options in discrete choice models: An application to commercial fishing effort," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 159-179.
  2. Tess M. Stafford, 2018. "Do workers work more when earnings are high?," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 1-11, November.
  3. Tess M. Stafford, 2015. "What Do Fishermen Tell Us That Taxi Drivers Do Not? An Empirical Investigation of Labor Supply," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(3), pages 683-710.
  4. Stafford, Tess M., 2015. "Indoor air quality and academic performance," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 34-50.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Tess Stafford, 2013. "Indoor Air Quality and Academic Performance," Discussion Papers 2013-25, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Fresh air is better for learning
      by Economic Logician in Economic Logic on 2013-12-05 22:20:00

Working papers

  1. Scott French & Tess Stafford, 2017. "Returns to Experience and the Elasticity of Labor Supply," Discussion Papers 2017-15, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.

    Cited by:

    1. Havranek, Tomas & Horvath, Roman & Elminejad, Ali, 2021. "Publication and Identification Biases in Measuring the Intertemporal Substitution of Labor Supply," MetaArXiv nshqx, Center for Open Science.
    2. Tess M. Stafford, 2018. "Do workers work more when earnings are high?," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 1-11, November.

  2. Tess Stafford, 2013. "Indoor Air Quality and Academic Performance," Discussion Papers 2013-25, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.

    Cited by:

    1. Chen, Xi & Zhang, Xiaobo & Zhang, Xin, 2017. "Smog in Our Brains: Gender Differences in the Impact of Exposure to Air Pollution on Cognitive Performance," IZA Discussion Papers 10628, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Joshua Goodman & Michael Hurwitz & Jisung Park & Jonathan Smith, 2018. "Heat and Learning," NBER Working Papers 24639, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Evan Herrnstadt & Erich Muehlegger, 2015. "Air Pollution and Criminal Activity: Evidence from Chicago Microdata," NBER Working Papers 21787, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Graff Zivin, Joshua & Liu, Tong & Song, Yingquan & Tang, Qu & Zhang, Peng, 2020. "The unintended impacts of agricultural fires: Human capital in China," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 147(C).
    5. Siqi Zheng & Xiaonan Zhang & Weizeng Sun & Chengtao Lin, 2019. "Air pollution and elite college graduates’ job location choice: evidence from China," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 63(2), pages 295-316, October.
    6. Qin, Yu & Wu, Jing & Yan, Jubo, 2019. "Negotiating housing deal on a polluted day: Consequences and possible explanations," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 161-187.
    7. Pinchbeck, Edward W. & Roth, Sefi & Szumilo, Nikodem & Vanino, Enrico, 2020. "The Price of Indoor Air Pollution: Evidence from Radon Maps and the Housing Market," IZA Discussion Papers 13655, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    8. Nguyen, Ha Trong & Le, Huong Thu & Connelly, Luke B., 2019. "Weather and children’s time allocation," MPRA Paper 94442, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Wei-Bin Zhang, 2015. "Oscillations in a Growth Model with Capital, Technology and Environment with Exogenous Shocks," Academicus International Scientific Journal, Entrepreneurship Training Center Albania, issue 12, pages 73-93, July.
    10. Nathaly Rivera, 2019. "Air Quality Warnings and Temporary Driving Bans: Evidence from Air Pollution, Car Trips, and Mass-Transit Ridership in Santiago," Working Papers 2019-06, University of Alaska Anchorage, Department of Economics.
    11. Pinchbeck, Edward W. & Roth, Sefi & Szumilo, Nikodem & Vanino, Enrico, 2021. "The price of indoor air pollution: evidence from risk maps and the housing market," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 111853, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    12. Mohammed Al-Surf & Ashraf Balabel & Mamdooh Alwetaishi & Ahmed Abdelhafiz & Usama Issa & Ibrahim Sharaky & Amal Shamseldin & Mosleh Al-Harthi, 2021. "Stakeholder’s Perspective on Green Building Rating Systems in Saudi Arabia: The Case of LEED, Mostadam, and the SDGs," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 13(15), pages 1-25, July.
    13. Williams, Niall & Zhang, Wei, 2016. "The Effects of Air Pollution on Education and Human Capital: Evidence from Prefecture-Level Cities in China," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, Boston, Massachusetts 236034, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    14. Marcotte, Dave E., 2017. "Something in the air? Air quality and children's educational outcomes," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 141-151.
    15. Andrea La Nauze & Edson R. Severnini, 2021. "Air Pollution and Adult Cognition: Evidence from Brain Training," NBER Working Papers 28785, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    16. Bellani, Luna & Ceolotto, Stefano & Elsner, Benjamin & Pestel, Nico, 2021. "Air Pollution Affects Decision-Making: Evidence from the Ballot Box," IZA Discussion Papers 14718, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    17. Yu Qin & Hongjia Zhu, 2018. "Run away? Air pollution and emigration interests in China," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 31(1), pages 235-266, January.
    18. Apriesnig, Jenny L. & Manning, Dale T. & Suter, Jordan F. & Magzamen, Sheryl & Cross, Jennifer E., 2020. "Academic stars and Energy Stars, an assessment of student academic achievement and school building energy efficiency," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 147(C).
    19. Sefi Roth, 2017. "Air pollution, educational achievements, and human capital formation," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 381-381, August.
    20. Yoshihiro Hamaguchi, 2021. "Environmental policy and social status preference for education in an Uzawa–Lucas model," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 73(3), pages 456-468, July.
    21. Weibing Li & Kaixia Zhang, 2019. "Does Air Pollution Crowd Out Foreign Direct Investment Inflows? Evidence from a Quasi-natural Experiment in China," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 73(4), pages 1387-1414, August.
    22. Chen, Xi & Zhang, Xiaobo & Zhang, Xin, 2017. "Smog in our brains: Gender differences in the impact of exposure to air pollution on cognitive performance in China," IFPRI discussion papers 1619, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

  3. Stafford, Tess, 2012. "Labor Supply of Fishermen: An Empirical Analysis," 2012 Conference (56th), February 7-10, 2012, Fremantle, Australia 124450, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.

    Cited by:

    1. Matthew Quaife & Fern Terris‐Prestholt & Zindoga Mukandavire & Peter Vickerman, 2021. "Modelling the effect of market forces on the impact of introducing human immunodeficiency virus pre‐exposure prophylaxis among female sex workers," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 30(3), pages 659-679, March.

Articles

  1. Stafford, Tess M., 2018. "Accounting for outside options in discrete choice models: An application to commercial fishing effort," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 159-179.

    Cited by:

    1. Dépalle, Maxime & Sanchirico, James N. & Thébaud, Olivier & O’Farrell, Shay & Haynie, Alan C. & Perruso, Larry, 2021. "Scale-dependency in discrete choice models: A fishery application," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 105(C).
    2. Caplan, Arthur J. & Akhundjanov, Sherzod B. & Toll, Kristopher, 2021. "Measuring heterogeneous preferences for residential amenities," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(C).
    3. Anna M. Birkenbach & Andreea L. Cojocaru & Frank Asche & Atle G. Guttormsen & Martin D. Smith, 2020. "Seasonal Harvest Patterns in Multispecies Fisheries," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 75(3), pages 631-655, March.

  2. Tess M. Stafford, 2015. "What Do Fishermen Tell Us That Taxi Drivers Do Not? An Empirical Investigation of Labor Supply," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(3), pages 683-710.

    Cited by:

    1. Havranek, Tomas & Horvath, Roman & Elminejad, Ali, 2021. "Publication and Identification Biases in Measuring the Intertemporal Substitution of Labor Supply," MetaArXiv nshqx, Center for Open Science.
    2. Isabel Z. Martinez & Emmanuel Saez & Michael Siegenthaler, 2018. "Intertemporal Labor Supply Substitution? Evidence from the Swiss Income Tax Holidays," NBER Working Papers 24634, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Ha Trong Nguyen & Alan Duncan, 2015. "Exchange Rate Fluctuations and Immigrants' Labour Market Outcomes: New Evidence from Australian Household Panel Data," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1503, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
    4. Scott French & Tess Stafford, 2017. "Returns to Experience and the Elasticity of Labor Supply," Discussion Papers 2017-15, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.
    5. Alexandre Mas & Amanda Pallais, 2019. "Labor Supply and the Value of Non-work Time: Experimental Estimates from the Field," American Economic Review: Insights, American Economic Association, vol. 1(1), pages 111-126, June.
    6. Martin, Vincent, 2017. "When to quit: Narrow bracketing and reference dependence in taxi drivers," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 144(C), pages 166-187.
    7. Sun, Hao & Wang, Hai & Wan, Zhixi, 2019. "Model and analysis of labor supply for ride-sharing platforms in the presence of sample self-selection and endogeneity," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 125(C), pages 76-93.
    8. MacDonald, Daniel & Mellizo, Philip, 2017. "Reference dependent preferences and labor supply in historical perspective," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 117-124.
    9. Harold E. Cuffe, 2018. "Rain and museum attendance: Are daily data fine enough?," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 42(2), pages 213-241, May.
    10. Wang, Hai & Yang, Hai, 2019. "Ridesourcing systems: A framework and review," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 129(C), pages 122-155.
    11. Xavier Giné & Monica Martinez-Bravo & Marian Vidal-Fernández, 2016. "Are Labor Supply Decisions Consistent with Neoclassical Preferences? Evidence from Indian Boat Owners," Working Papers wp2016_1604, CEMFI, revised Jan 2017.
    12. Leong, Kaiwen & Li, Huailu & Xu, Haibo, 2019. "Effect of Enforcement Shock on Pushers' Activities: Evidence from an Asian Drug-Selling Gang," IZA Discussion Papers 12083, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    13. Jason Sandvik & Richard Saouma & Nathan Seegert & Christopher Stanton, 2018. "Analyzing the Aftermath of a Compensation Reduction," NBER Working Papers 25135, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Hammarlund, Cecilia, 2018. "A trip to reach the target? – The labor supply of Swedish Baltic cod fishermen," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 1-11.
    15. Timothy J. Richards, 2020. "Income Targeting and Farm Labor Supply," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 102(2), pages 419-438, March.
    16. Garry Barrett & Daniel S. Hamermesh, 2016. "Labor Supply Elasticities: Overcoming Nonclassical Measurement Error Using More Accurate Hours Data," NBER Working Papers 22920, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    17. Tess M. Stafford, 2018. "Do workers work more when earnings are high?," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 1-11, November.

  3. Stafford, Tess M., 2015. "Indoor air quality and academic performance," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 34-50.
    See citations under working paper version above.

More information

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Statistics

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NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 4 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-EDU: Education (1) 2013-11-02
  2. NEP-ENV: Environmental Economics (1) 2012-06-25
  3. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (1) 2012-06-25
  4. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (1) 2017-09-24
  5. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (1) 2013-11-02

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