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Jørgen Modalsli
(Jorgen Modalsli)

Personal Details

First Name:Jorgen
Middle Name:
Last Name:Modalsli
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pmo642
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
Twitter: @modalsli
Terminal Degree: (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

(80%) Handelshøyskolen
OsloMet- storbyuniversitetet

Oslo, Norway
https://www.oslomet.no/om/sam/hhs
RePEc:edi:ohioano (more details at EDIRC)

(20%) Statistisk Sentralbyrå
Government of Norway

Oslo, Norway
http://www.ssb.no/
RePEc:edi:ssbgvno (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Tora K. Knutsen & Jørgen Modalsli & Marte Rønning, 2020. "Distance and choice of field. Evidence from a Norwegian college expansion reform," Discussion Papers 932, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
  2. Rolf Aaberge & Jørgen Modalsli & Anthony B. Atkinson, 2020. "Estimating long-run income inequality from mixed tabular data. Empirical evidence from Norway, 1875-2017," Discussion Papers 928, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
  3. Kelly Vosters & Jørgen Modalsli, 2019. "Spillover bias in multigenerational income regressions," Discussion Papers 897, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
  4. Stefan Leknes & Jørgen Modalsli, 2018. "Who benefited from industrialization? The local effects of hydropower technology adoption," Discussion Papers 874, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
  5. Andreas Kotsadam & Jo Thori Lind & Jørgen Modalsli, 2017. "Call the Midwife - Health Personnel and Mortality in Norway 1887-1921," CESifo Working Paper Series 6831, CESifo.
  6. Jørgen Modalsli, 2016. "The regional dispersion of income inequality in nineteenth-century Norway," Discussion Papers 842, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
  7. Jørgen Modalsli, 2016. "Multigenerational persistence. Evidence from 146 years of administrative data," Discussion Papers 850, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
  8. Rolf Aaberge & Anthony B Atkinson & Jørgen Modalsli, 2016. "On the measurement of long-run income inequality. Empirical evidence from Norway, 1875-2013," Discussion Papers 847, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
  9. Jørgen Modalsli, 2015. "Intergenerational mobility in Norway, 1865-2011," Discussion Papers 798, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
  10. Jørgen Modalsli, 2015. "Estimating occupational mobility with covariates," Discussion Papers 804, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
  11. Rolf Aaberge & Anthony B. Atkinson & Jørgen Modalsli, 2013. "The ins and outs of top income mobility," Discussion Papers 762, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
  12. Heibø Modalsli, Jørgen, 2011. "Solow meets Marx: Economic growth and the emergence of social class," Memorandum 21/2011, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
  13. Modalsli, Jørgen Heibø, 2011. "Polarization, Risk and Welfare in General Equilibrium," Memorandum 27/2011, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
  14. Modalsli, Jørgen, 2011. "Inequality and growth in the very long run: inferring inequality from data on social groups," Memorandum 11/2011, Oslo University, Department of Economics.

Articles

  1. Leknes, Stefan & Modalsli, Jørgen, 2020. "Who Benefited from Industrialization? The Local Effects of Hydropower Technology Adoption in Norway," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 80(1), pages 207-245, March.
  2. Aaberge, Rolf & Atkinson, Anthony B. & Modalsli, Jørgen, 2020. "Estimating long-run income inequality from mixed tabular data: Empirical evidence from Norway, 1875–2017," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 187(C).
  3. Modalsli, Jørgen, 2018. "The regional dispersion of income inequality in nineteenth-century Norway," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 62-79.
  4. Jørgen Modalsli, 2017. "Intergenerational Mobility in Norway, 1865–2011," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 119(1), pages 34-71, January.
  5. Jørgen Modalsli, 2017. "Decomposing Global Inequality," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 63(3), pages 445-463, September.
  6. Jørgen Modalsli, 2015. "Inequality in the very long run: inferring inequality from data on social groups," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 13(2), pages 225-247, June.
  7. Modalsli, Jørgen, 2015. "Estimating occupational mobility with covariates," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 133(C), pages 77-80.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Rolf Aaberge & Anthony B. Atkinson & Jørgen Modalsli, 2013. "The ins and outs of top income mobility," Discussion Papers 762, Statistics Norway, Research Department.

    Mentioned in:

    1. The ins and outs of top income mobility
      by maximorossi in NEP-LTV blog on 2013-12-27 18:50:38
    2. The Ins and Outs of Top Income Mobility
      by maximorossi in NEP-LTV blog on 2013-12-03 19:11:38
  2. Heibø Modalsli, Jørgen, 2011. "Solow meets Marx: Economic growth and the emergence of social class," Memorandum 21/2011, Oslo University, Department of Economics.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Marx and Solow
      by Economic Logician in Economic Logic on 2011-10-07 18:30:00
  3. Aaberge, Rolf & Atkinson, Tony & Modalsli, Jorgen Heibo, 2013. "The Ins and Outs of Top Income Mobility," IZA Discussion Papers 7729, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    Mentioned in:

    1. The ins and outs of top income mobility
      by maximorossi in NEP-LTV blog on 2013-12-27 18:50:38
    2. The Ins and Outs of Top Income Mobility
      by maximorossi in NEP-LTV blog on 2013-12-03 19:11:38
  4. Rolf Aaberge & Anthony B Atkinson & Jørgen Modalsli, 2016. "On the measurement of long-run income inequality. Empirical evidence from Norway, 1875-2013," Discussion Papers 847, Statistics Norway, Research Department.

    Mentioned in:

    1. On the measurement of long-run income inequality. Empirical evidence from Norway, 1875-2013
      by maximorossi in NEP-LTV blog on 2016-10-19 19:25:50

Working papers

  1. Rolf Aaberge & Jørgen Modalsli & Anthony B. Atkinson, 2020. "Estimating long-run income inequality from mixed tabular data. Empirical evidence from Norway, 1875-2017," Discussion Papers 928, Statistics Norway, Research Department.

    Cited by:

    1. Winkelried, Diego & Escobar, Bruno, 2020. "Declining inequality in Latin America? Robustness checks for Peru," MPRA Paper 106566, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Daron Acemoglu & Tuomas Pekkarinen & Kjell G. Salvanes & Matti Sarvimäki, 2021. "The Making of Social Democracy: The Economic and Electoral Consequences of Norway’s 1936 Folk School Reform," NBER Working Papers 29095, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Domenico Moramarco & Flaviana Palmisano & Vito Peragine, 2020. "Intertemporal Inequality of Opportunity," Working Papers ECARES 2020-26, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.

  2. Kelly Vosters & Jørgen Modalsli, 2019. "Spillover bias in multigenerational income regressions," Discussion Papers 897, Statistics Norway, Research Department.

    Cited by:

    1. Zachary Ward, 2019. "Intergenerational Mobility in American History: Accounting for Race and Measurement Error," CEH Discussion Papers 10, Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.

  3. Stefan Leknes & Jørgen Modalsli, 2018. "Who benefited from industrialization? The local effects of hydropower technology adoption," Discussion Papers 874, Statistics Norway, Research Department.

    Cited by:

    1. Molinder, Jakob & Karlsson, Tobias & Enflo, Kerstin, 2019. "More Power to the People: Electricity Adoption, Technological Change and Social Conflict," Lund Papers in Economic History 206, Lund University, Department of Economic History, revised 13 Oct 2020.

  4. Jørgen Modalsli, 2016. "The regional dispersion of income inequality in nineteenth-century Norway," Discussion Papers 842, Statistics Norway, Research Department.

    Cited by:

    1. Charlotte Bartels & Felix Kersting & Nikolaus Wolf, 2021. "Testing Marx. Income inequality, concentration, and socialism in late 19th century Germany," Working Papers 0211, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    2. Modalsli, Jørgen, 2018. "The regional dispersion of income inequality in nineteenth-century Norway," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 62-79.
    3. Andreas Kotsadam & Jo Thori Lind & Jørgen Modalsli, 2017. "Call the Midwife - Health Personnel and Mortality in Norway 1887-1921," CESifo Working Paper Series 6831, CESifo.
    4. Bukowski, Pawel & Novokmet, Filip, 2021. "Between communism and capitalism: long-term inequality in Poland, 1892–2015," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 110221, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    5. Paweł Bukowski & Filip Novokmet, 2021. "Between communism and capitalism: long-term inequality in Poland, 1892–2015," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 26(2), pages 187-239, June.

  5. Jørgen Modalsli, 2016. "Multigenerational persistence. Evidence from 146 years of administrative data," Discussion Papers 850, Statistics Norway, Research Department.

    Cited by:

    1. Adermon, Adrian & Lindahl, Mikael & Palme, Mårten, 2019. "Dynastic Human Capital, Inequality and Intergenerational Mobility," IZA Discussion Papers 12300, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Kelly Vosters & Jørgen Modalsli, 2019. "Spillover bias in multigenerational income regressions," Discussion Papers 897, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    3. Martin Nybom & Jan Stuhler, 2019. "Steady-state assumptions in intergenerational mobility research," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 17(1), pages 77-97, March.
    4. Ricardo Dahis & Emily Nix & Nancy Qian, 2019. "Choosing Racial Identity in the United States, 1880-1940," NBER Working Papers 26465, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  6. Rolf Aaberge & Anthony B Atkinson & Jørgen Modalsli, 2016. "On the measurement of long-run income inequality. Empirical evidence from Norway, 1875-2013," Discussion Papers 847, Statistics Norway, Research Department.

    Cited by:

    1. Christopher Hartwell & Roman Horvath & Eva Horvathova & Olga Popova, 2022. "Natural resources and income inequality in developed countries: synthetic control method evidence," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 62(2), pages 297-338, February.
    2. Iacono, Roberto & Palagi, Elisa, 2020. "Still the lands of equality? On the heterogeneity of individual factor income shares in the Nordics," GLO Discussion Paper Series 677, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    3. Branko Milanovic, 2022. "After the Financial Crisis: The Evolution of the Global Income Distribution Between 2008 and 2013," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 68(1), pages 43-73, March.
    4. Bütikofer, Aline & Karadakic, René & Salvanes, Kjell Gunnar, 2021. "Income Inequality and Mortality: A Norwegian Perspective," Discussion Paper Series in Economics 4/2021, Norwegian School of Economics, Department of Economics.
    5. Wiemer Salverda, 2019. "Top Incomes, Income and Wealth Inequality in the Netherlands: The first 100 Years 1914-2014 -what's next?," Working Papers hal-02877004, HAL.

  7. Jørgen Modalsli, 2015. "Intergenerational mobility in Norway, 1865-2011," Discussion Papers 798, Statistics Norway, Research Department.

    Cited by:

    1. Adermon, Adrian & Lindahl, Mikael & Waldenström, Daniel, 2016. "Intergenerational Wealth Mobility and the Role of Inheritance: Evidence from Multiple Generations," IZA Discussion Papers 10126, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Antonie, Luiza & Inwood, Kris & Minns, Chris & Summerfield, Fraser, 2021. "Intergenerational mobility in a mid-Atlantic economy: Canada, 1871-1901," Economic History Working Papers 108411, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
    3. Sarvimäki, Matti & Pekkarinen, Tuomas & Salvanes, Kjell G., 2016. "The evolution of social mobility: Norway over the 20th century," Working Papers 76, VATT Institute for Economic Research.
    4. Yu-Wei Luke Chu & Ming-Jen Lin, 2020. "Intergenerational earnings mobility in Taiwan: 1990–2010," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 59(1), pages 11-45, July.
    5. Martti Kaila & Emily Nix & Krista Riukula, 2021. "Disparate Impacts of Job Loss by Parental Income and Implications for Intergenerational Mobility," Opportunity and Inclusive Growth Institute Working Papers 53, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
    6. Jing You & Miguel Niño-Zarazúa, 2017. "Smoothing or strengthening the 'Great Gatsby curve'?: The intergenerational impact of China's New Rural Pension Scheme," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2017-199, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    7. Ran Abramitzky & Leah Boustan & Katherine Eriksson & James Feigenbaum & Santiago Pérez, 2021. "Automated Linking of Historical Data," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 59(3), pages 865-918, September.
    8. Stefan Leknes & Jørgen Modalsli, 2018. "Who benefited from industrialization? The local effects of hydropower technology adoption," Discussion Papers 874, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    9. Jon H. Fiva & Oda Nedregård & Henning Øien, 2021. "Polarization in Parliamentary Speech," CESifo Working Paper Series 8818, CESifo.
    10. Martha J. Bailey & Connor Cole & Morgan Henderson & Catherine Massey, 2020. "How Well Do Automated Linking Methods Perform? Lessons from US Historical Data," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 58(4), pages 997-1044, December.

  8. Jørgen Modalsli, 2015. "Estimating occupational mobility with covariates," Discussion Papers 804, Statistics Norway, Research Department.

    Cited by:

    1. Giovanni Razzu & Ayago Wambile, 2020. "Three-generation educational mobility in six African countries," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2020-23, Department of Economics, University of Reading.
    2. Nina Boberg-Fazlić & Paul Sharp, 2018. "North and south: long-run social mobility in England and attitudes toward welfare," Cliometrica, Springer;Cliometric Society (Association Francaise de Cliométrie), vol. 12(2), pages 251-276, May.
    3. Jørgen Modalsli, 2016. "Multigenerational persistence. Evidence from 146 years of administrative data," Discussion Papers 850, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    4. Antonio Caparrós Ruiz, 2018. "Intergenerational occupational dynamics before and during the recent crisis in Spain," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 45(2), pages 367-393, May.
    5. Giacomin Favre, 2019. "Bias in social mobility estimates with historical data: evidence from Swiss microdata," ECON - Working Papers 329, Department of Economics - University of Zurich.

  9. Rolf Aaberge & Anthony B. Atkinson & Jørgen Modalsli, 2013. "The ins and outs of top income mobility," Discussion Papers 762, Statistics Norway, Research Department.

    Cited by:

    1. Anthony B. Atkinson & Alessandra Casarico & Sarah Voitchovsky, 2018. "Top incomes and the gender divide," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 16(2), pages 225-256, June.
    2. Guttorm Schjelderup, 2015. "Taxing Mobile Capital and Profits: The Nordic Welfare States," CESifo Working Paper Series 5603, CESifo.
    3. Aaberge, Rolf & Atkinson, Anthony B. & Modalsli, Jørgen, 2020. "Estimating long-run income inequality from mixed tabular data: Empirical evidence from Norway, 1875–2017," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 187(C).
    4. Fagereng, Andreas & Guiso, Luigi & Malacrino, Davide & Pistaferri, Luigi, 2016. "Heterogeneity and Persistence in Returns to Wealth," CEPR Discussion Papers 11635, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Gabriel Burdín & Mauricio de Rosa & Andrea Vigorito & Joan Vilá, 2019. "Was falling inequality in all Latin American countries a data-driven illusion? Income distribution and mobility patterns in Uruguay 2009-2016," Documentos de Trabajo (working papers) 19-30, Instituto de Economia - IECON.
    6. Rolf Aaberge & Anthony B Atkinson & Jørgen Modalsli, 2016. "On the measurement of long-run income inequality. Empirical evidence from Norway, 1875-2013," Discussion Papers 847, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    7. Rolf Aaberge & Anthony B. Atkinson & Sebastian Königs, 2018. "From classes to copulas: wages, capital, and top incomes," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 16(2), pages 295-320, June.
    8. Modalsli, Jørgen, 2018. "The regional dispersion of income inequality in nineteenth-century Norway," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 62-79.
    9. Alstadsaeter, Annette & Jacob, Martin & Kopczuk, Wojciech & Telle, Kjetil, 2016. "Accounting for Business Income in Measuring Top Income Shares: Integrated Accrual Approach Using Individual and Firm Data from Norway," CEPR Discussion Papers 11671, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    10. Terhi Ravaska, 2018. "Top incomes and income dynamics from a gender perspective: Evidence from Finland 1995-2012," Working Papers 469, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    11. Roberto Iacono, 2016. "The Nordic Model and the Oil Nation," Working Papers hal-01402143, HAL.
    12. Terhi Ravaska, 2018. "Top incomes and income dynamics from a gender perspective: Evidence from Finland 1995–2012," Working Papers 321, Työn ja talouden tutkimus LABORE, The Labour Institute for Economic Research LABORE.
    13. Herault, Nicolas & Hyslop, Dean & Jenkins, Stephen P. & Wilkins, Roger, 2021. "Rising Top-Income Persistence in Australia: Evidence from Income Tax Data," IZA Discussion Papers 14737, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    14. Thomas A Hirschl & Mark R Rank, 2015. "The Life Course Dynamics of Affluence," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 10(1), pages 1-10, January.
    15. Isabel Z. Martínez, 2021. "Evidence from Unique Swiss Tax Data on the Composition and Joint Distribution of Income and Wealth," NBER Chapters, in: Measuring Distribution and Mobility of Income and Wealth, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    16. Ravaska Terhi, 2018. "Top incomes and income dynamics from a gender perspective : Evidence from Finland 1995-2012," Working Papers 1822, Tampere University, School of Management and Business, Economics.

  10. Heibø Modalsli, Jørgen, 2011. "Solow meets Marx: Economic growth and the emergence of social class," Memorandum 21/2011, Oslo University, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Modalsli, Jørgen Heibø, 2011. "Polarization, Risk and Welfare in General Equilibrium," Memorandum 27/2011, Oslo University, Department of Economics.

  11. Modalsli, Jørgen, 2011. "Inequality and growth in the very long run: inferring inequality from data on social groups," Memorandum 11/2011, Oslo University, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Wouter Ryckbosch, 2016. "Editor's choice Economic inequality and growth before the industrial revolution: the case of the Low Countries (fourteenth to nineteenth centuries)," European Review of Economic History, Oxford University Press, vol. 20(1), pages 1-22.
    2. Popov, Vladimir, 2014. "Socialism is dead, long live socialism!," MPRA Paper 54294, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Steven Nafziger & Peter Lindert, 2011. "Russian Inequality on the Eve of Revolution," Department of Economics Working Papers 2013-13, Department of Economics, Williams College, revised Sep 2013.
    4. Wouter Ryckbosch, 2014. "Economic inequality and growth before the industrial revolution: A case study of the Low Countries (14th-19th centuries)," Working Papers 067, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.
    5. Young, Alwyn, 2011. "The Gini coefficient for a mixture of Ln-Normal populations," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 54246, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    6. Milanovic, Branko, 2011. "A short history of global inequality: The past two centuries," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 48(4), pages 494-506.

Articles

  1. Leknes, Stefan & Modalsli, Jørgen, 2020. "Who Benefited from Industrialization? The Local Effects of Hydropower Technology Adoption in Norway," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 80(1), pages 207-245, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Björn Brey, 2021. "The Long-run Gains from the Early Adoption of Electricity," Working Papers ECARES 2021-23, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.

  2. Aaberge, Rolf & Atkinson, Anthony B. & Modalsli, Jørgen, 2020. "Estimating long-run income inequality from mixed tabular data: Empirical evidence from Norway, 1875–2017," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 187(C).
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Modalsli, Jørgen, 2018. "The regional dispersion of income inequality in nineteenth-century Norway," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 62-79.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  4. Jørgen Modalsli, 2017. "Intergenerational Mobility in Norway, 1865–2011," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 119(1), pages 34-71, January.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  5. Jørgen Modalsli, 2017. "Decomposing Global Inequality," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 63(3), pages 445-463, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Pablo Gutiérrez Cubillos, 2022. "Gini and undercoverage at the upper tail: a simple approximation," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 29(2), pages 443-471, April.

  6. Jørgen Modalsli, 2015. "Inequality in the very long run: inferring inequality from data on social groups," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 13(2), pages 225-247, June.

    Cited by:

    1. Branko Milanovic, 2018. "Towards an explanation of inequality in premodern societies: the role of colonies, urbanization, and high population density," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 71(4), pages 1029-1047, November.
    2. Esteban Nicolini & Fernando Ramos Palencia, 2016. "Comparing Income and Wealth Inequality in Pre-Industrial economies. Lessons from Spain in the 18th century," Working Papers 16.01, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Department of Economics, Quantitative Methods and Economic History.
    3. Jørgen Modalsli, 2017. "Decomposing Global Inequality," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 63(3), pages 445-463, September.
    4. Inwood, Kris & Minns, Chris & Summerfield, Fraser, 2019. "Occupational income scores and immigrant assimilation. Evidence from the Canadian census," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 114-122.
    5. Sihai Zhang & Zhiyang Wang, 2016. "Inferring Passenger Denial Behavior of Taxi Drivers from Large-Scale Taxi Traces," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 11(11), pages 1-21, November.
    6. Espín-Sánchez, José-Antonio & Gil-Guirado, Salvador & Giraldo-Paez, W. Daniel & Vickers, Chris, 2019. "Labor income inequality in pre-industrial Mediterranean Spain: The city of Murcia in the 18th century," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 1-1.
    7. Milanovic, Branko, 2016. "Towards an explanation of inequality in pre-modern societies:the role of colonies and high population density," MPRA Paper 74877, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Esteban A. Nicolini & Fernando Ramos Palencia, 2016. "Comparing Income and Wealth Inequality in Pre-Industrial Economies: Lessons from 18th-Century Spain," Working Papers 0095, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).

  7. Modalsli, Jørgen, 2015. "Estimating occupational mobility with covariates," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 133(C), pages 77-80.
    See citations under working paper version above.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 16 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (10) 2011-05-07 2013-04-27 2015-04-02 2016-07-23 2016-10-09 2016-11-27 2017-03-12 2018-03-12 2018-05-14 2020-06-08. Author is listed
  2. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (7) 2011-09-22 2013-11-29 2015-04-02 2016-11-27 2018-05-14 2019-03-04 2020-08-24. Author is listed
  3. NEP-LTV: Unemployment, Inequality & Poverty (4) 2013-11-29 2013-12-15 2016-10-09 2017-03-12
  4. NEP-ECM: Econometrics (2) 2015-04-25 2019-03-04
  5. NEP-EVO: Evolutionary Economics (2) 2013-04-27 2016-11-27
  6. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (2) 2011-09-22 2013-12-15
  7. NEP-PBE: Public Economics (2) 2013-11-29 2016-10-09
  8. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (2) 2016-07-23 2018-05-14
  9. NEP-AGR: Agricultural Economics (1) 2016-07-23
  10. NEP-DGE: Dynamic General Equilibrium (1) 2011-09-22
  11. NEP-EDU: Education (1) 2020-08-24
  12. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (1) 2018-03-12
  13. NEP-NEU: Neuroeconomics (1) 2016-11-27
  14. NEP-PKE: Post Keynesian Economics (1) 2011-09-22
  15. NEP-SOC: Social Norms & Social Capital (1) 2011-05-07
  16. NEP-TID: Technology & Industrial Dynamics (1) 2018-05-14

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