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Jørgen Modalsli

Personal Details

First Name:Jørgen
Middle Name:
Last Name:Modalsli
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pmo642
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
Twitter: @modalsli

Affiliation

Statistisk Sentralbyrå
Government of Norway

Oslo, Norway
http://www.ssb.no/

: +47 - 62 88 50 00
+47 - 62 88 55 95
Akersveien 26, P.O.Box 8131 Dep, N-0033 Oslo
RePEc:edi:ssbgvno (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Stefan Leknes & Jørgen Modalsli, 2018. "Who benefited from industrialization? The local effects of hydropower technology adoption," Discussion Papers 874, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
  2. Andreas Kotsadam & Jo Thori Lind & Jørgen Modalsli, 2017. "Call the Midwife - Health Personnel and Mortality in Norway 1887-1921," CESifo Working Paper Series 6831, CESifo Group Munich.
  3. Jørgen Modalsli, 2016. "The regional dispersion of income inequality in nineteenth-century Norway," Discussion Papers 842, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
  4. Jørgen Modalsli, 2016. "Multigenerational persistence. Evidence from 146 years of administrative data," Discussion Papers 850, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
  5. Rolf Aaberge & Anthony B Atkinson & Jørgen Modalsli, 2016. "On the measurement of long-run income inequality. Empirical evidence from Norway, 1875-2013," Discussion Papers 847, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
  6. Jørgen Modalsli, 2015. "Intergenerational mobility in Norway, 1865-2011," Discussion Papers 798, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
  7. Jørgen Modalsli, 2015. "Estimating occupational mobility with covariates," Discussion Papers 804, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
  8. Rolf Aaberge & Anthony B. Atkinson & Jørgen Modalsli, 2013. "The ins and outs of top income mobility," Discussion Papers 762, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
  9. Heibø Modalsli, Jørgen, 2011. "Solow meets Marx: Economic growth and the emergence of social class," Memorandum 21/2011, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
  10. Modalsli, Jørgen Heibø, 2011. "Polarization, Risk and Welfare in General Equilibrium," Memorandum 27/2011, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
  11. Modalsli, Jørgen, 2011. "Inequality and growth in the very long run: inferring inequality from data on social groups," Memorandum 11/2011, Oslo University, Department of Economics.

Articles

  1. Modalsli, Jørgen, 2018. "The regional dispersion of income inequality in nineteenth-century Norway," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 62-79.
  2. Jørgen Modalsli, 2017. "Intergenerational Mobility in Norway, 1865–2011," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 119(1), pages 34-71, January.
  3. Jørgen Modalsli, 2017. "Decomposing Global Inequality," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 63(3), pages 445-463, September.
  4. Jørgen Modalsli, 2015. "Inequality in the very long run: inferring inequality from data on social groups," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 13(2), pages 225-247, June.
  5. Modalsli, Jørgen, 2015. "Estimating occupational mobility with covariates," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 133(C), pages 77-80.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Rolf Aaberge & Anthony B. Atkinson & Jørgen Modalsli, 2013. "The ins and outs of top income mobility," Discussion Papers 762, Statistics Norway, Research Department.

    Mentioned in:

    1. The ins and outs of top income mobility
      by maximorossi in NEP-LTV blog on 2013-12-27 18:50:38
    2. The Ins and Outs of Top Income Mobility
      by maximorossi in NEP-LTV blog on 2013-12-03 19:11:38
  2. Heibø Modalsli, Jørgen, 2011. "Solow meets Marx: Economic growth and the emergence of social class," Memorandum 21/2011, Oslo University, Department of Economics.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Marx and Solow
      by Economic Logician in Economic Logic on 2011-10-07 18:30:00
  3. Aaberge, Rolf & Atkinson, Tony & Modalsli, Jorgen Heibo, 2013. "The Ins and Outs of Top Income Mobility," IZA Discussion Papers 7729, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    Mentioned in:

    1. The ins and outs of top income mobility
      by maximorossi in NEP-LTV blog on 2013-12-27 18:50:38
    2. The Ins and Outs of Top Income Mobility
      by maximorossi in NEP-LTV blog on 2013-12-03 19:11:38
  4. Rolf Aaberge & Anthony B Atkinson & Jørgen Modalsli, 2016. "On the measurement of long-run income inequality. Empirical evidence from Norway, 1875-2013," Discussion Papers 847, Statistics Norway, Research Department.

    Mentioned in:

    1. On the measurement of long-run income inequality. Empirical evidence from Norway, 1875-2013
      by maximorossi in NEP-LTV blog on 2016-10-19 19:25:50

Working papers

  1. Jørgen Modalsli, 2016. "Multigenerational persistence. Evidence from 146 years of administrative data," Discussion Papers 850, Statistics Norway, Research Department.

    Cited by:

    1. Adermon, Adrian & Lindahl, Mikael & Palme, Mårten, 2016. "Dynastic human capital, inequality and intergenerational mobility," Working Paper Series 2016:19, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.

  2. Jørgen Modalsli, 2015. "Intergenerational mobility in Norway, 1865-2011," Discussion Papers 798, Statistics Norway, Research Department.

    Cited by:

    1. Adermon, Adrian & Lindahl, Mikael & Waldenström, Daniel, 2016. "Intergenerational wealth mobility and the role of inheritance: Evidence from multiple generations," CEPR Discussion Papers 11456, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Martha Bailey & Connor Cole & Morgan Henderson & Catherine Massey, 2017. "How Well Do Automated Methods Perform in Historical Samples? Evidence from New Ground Truth," NBER Working Papers 24019, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Jing You & Miguel Niño-Zarazúa, 2017. "Smoothing or strengthening the ‘Great Gatsby Curve’? The intergenerational impact of China’s New Rural Pension Scheme," WIDER Working Paper Series 199, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    4. Sarvimäki, Matti & Pekkarinen, Tuomas & Salvanes, Kjell G., 2016. "The evolution of social mobility: Norway over the 20th century," Working Papers 76, VATT Institute for Economic Research.
    5. Stefan Leknes & Jørgen Modalsli, 2018. "Who benefited from industrialization? The local effects of hydropower technology adoption," Discussion Papers 874, Statistics Norway, Research Department.

  3. Jørgen Modalsli, 2015. "Estimating occupational mobility with covariates," Discussion Papers 804, Statistics Norway, Research Department.

    Cited by:

    1. Nina Boberg-Fazlić & Paul Sharp, 2018. "North and south: long-run social mobility in England and attitudes toward welfare," Cliometrica, Springer;Cliometric Society (Association Francaise de Cliométrie), vol. 12(2), pages 251-276, May.
    2. Jørgen Modalsli, 2016. "Multigenerational persistence. Evidence from 146 years of administrative data," Discussion Papers 850, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    3. Antonio Caparrós Ruiz, 2018. "Intergenerational occupational dynamics before and during the recent crisis in Spain," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 45(2), pages 367-393, May.

  4. Rolf Aaberge & Anthony B. Atkinson & Jørgen Modalsli, 2013. "The ins and outs of top income mobility," Discussion Papers 762, Statistics Norway, Research Department.

    Cited by:

    1. Andreas Fagereng & Luigi Guiso & Davide Malacrino & Luigi Pistaferri, 2016. "Heterogeneity and Persistence in Returns to Wealth," NBER Working Papers 22822, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. A.B. Atkinson & A. Casarico & S. Voitchovsky, 2016. "Top Incomes and the Gender Divide," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2016n27, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    3. Aaberge, Rolf & Atkinson, Tony & Modalsli, Jorgen Heibo, 2017. "On the Measurement of Long-Run Income Inequality: Empirical Evidence from Norway, 1875-2013," IZA Discussion Papers 10574, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Guttorm Schjelderup, 2015. "Taxing Mobile Capital and Profits: The Nordic Welfare States," CESifo Working Paper Series 5603, CESifo Group Munich.

  5. Heibø Modalsli, Jørgen, 2011. "Solow meets Marx: Economic growth and the emergence of social class," Memorandum 21/2011, Oslo University, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Modalsli, Jørgen Heibø, 2011. "Polarization, Risk and Welfare in General Equilibrium," Memorandum 27/2011, Oslo University, Department of Economics.

  6. Modalsli, Jørgen, 2011. "Inequality and growth in the very long run: inferring inequality from data on social groups," Memorandum 11/2011, Oslo University, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Wouter Ryckbosch, 2016. "Editor's choice Economic inequality and growth before the industrial revolution: the case of the Low Countries (fourteenth to nineteenth centuries)," European Review of Economic History, Oxford University Press, vol. 20(1), pages 1-22.
    2. Wouter Ryckbosch, 2014. "Economic inequality and growth before the industrial revolution: A case study of the Low Countries (14th-19th centuries)," Working Papers 067, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.
    3. Young, Alwyn, 2011. "The Gini coefficient for a mixture of Ln-Normal populations," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 54246, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    4. Milanovic, Branko, 2011. "A short history of global inequality: The past two centuries," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 48(4), pages 494-506.

Articles

  1. Jørgen Modalsli, 2017. "Intergenerational Mobility in Norway, 1865–2011," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 119(1), pages 34-71, January.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Jørgen Modalsli, 2015. "Inequality in the very long run: inferring inequality from data on social groups," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 13(2), pages 225-247, June.

    Cited by:

    1. Esteban Nicolini & Fernando Ramos Palencia, 2016. "Comparing Income and Wealth Inequality in Pre-Industrial economies. Lessons from Spain in the 18th century," Working Papers 16.01, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Department of Economics, Quantitative Methods and Economic History.
    2. Jørgen Modalsli, 2017. "Decomposing Global Inequality," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 63(3), pages 445-463, September.
    3. Milanovic, Branko, 2016. "Towards an explanation of inequality in pre-modern societies:the role of colonies and high population density," MPRA Paper 74877, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Esteban A. Nicolini & Fernando Ramos Palencia, 2016. "Comparing Income and Wealth Inequality in Pre-Industrial Economies: Lessons from 18th-Century Spain," Working Papers 0095, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).

  3. Modalsli, Jørgen, 2015. "Estimating occupational mobility with covariates," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 133(C), pages 77-80.
    See citations under working paper version above.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 11 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (9) 2011-05-07 2013-04-27 2015-04-02 2016-07-23 2016-10-09 2016-11-27 2017-03-12 2018-03-12 2018-05-14. Author is listed
  2. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (5) 2011-09-22 2013-11-29 2015-04-02 2016-11-27 2018-05-14. Author is listed
  3. NEP-LTV: Unemployment, Inequality & Poverty (4) 2013-11-29 2013-12-15 2016-10-09 2017-03-12. Author is listed
  4. NEP-EVO: Evolutionary Economics (2) 2013-04-27 2016-11-27
  5. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (2) 2011-09-22 2013-12-15
  6. NEP-PBE: Public Economics (2) 2013-11-29 2016-10-09
  7. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (2) 2016-07-23 2018-05-14
  8. NEP-AGR: Agricultural Economics (1) 2016-07-23
  9. NEP-DGE: Dynamic General Equilibrium (1) 2011-09-22
  10. NEP-ECM: Econometrics (1) 2015-04-25
  11. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (1) 2018-03-12
  12. NEP-NEU: Neuroeconomics (1) 2016-11-27
  13. NEP-PKE: Post Keynesian Economics (1) 2011-09-22
  14. NEP-SOC: Social Norms & Social Capital (1) 2011-05-07
  15. NEP-TID: Technology & Industrial Dynamics (1) 2018-05-14

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