IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/hal/wilwps/hal-02877004.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Top Incomes, Income and Wealth Inequality in the Netherlands: The first 100 Years 1914-2014 -what's next?

Author

Listed:
  • Wiemer Salverda

    (UvA - University of Amsterdam [Amsterdam])

Abstract

In 2001 Tony very kindly agreed that we would work together on the top income shares for our two countries, the Netherlands and the UK. I profited enormously from his experience with top incomes and, naturally, with the UK, and, surprisingly, also with my own country. He could actually read Dutch and had much easier access to the pre-war Dutch statistics than I had. He joked about non-existent privacy concerns in the statistics of those days as that highest class of incomes counted one observation only – Tony imagined that would be Henri Deterding, chairman of Royal Dutch Shell up to 1937. I treasure the moments we sat together at Nuffield for work, at the high table, or, equally nicely, in a pub for a beer. With his guidance we successfully laid the basis for the first 85 years (1914-1999), on which I have built for a summary update of Dutch top incomes to the year 2012 (Salverda, 2013) and on which I base myself for the present paper's more extensive update to 2014. Tony has seen most of the new material (compare the Graphs section below) in July 2016 and responded, even on holiday, with some suggestions and questions. He liked chart books, well this is one. It is really very sad that we have not been able to finish this together. He liked the ‘100 years' completion of the series, and anyone who knew him would have wished him a century in good health.

Suggested Citation

  • Wiemer Salverda, 2019. "Top Incomes, Income and Wealth Inequality in the Netherlands: The first 100 Years 1914-2014 -what's next?," World Inequality Lab Working Papers hal-02877004, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:wilwps:hal-02877004
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal-pjse.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-02877004
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://hal-pjse.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-02877004/document
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Knoef, Marike & Been, Jim & Alessie, Rob & Caminada, Koen & Goudswaard, Kees & Kalwij, Adriaan, 2016. "Measuring retirement savings adequacy: developing a multi-pillar approach in the Netherlands," Journal of Pension Economics and Finance, Cambridge University Press, vol. 15(1), pages 55-89, January.
    2. Anthony B. Atkinson & Wiemer Salverda, 2005. "Top Incomes In The Netherlands And The United Kingdom Over The 20th Century," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 3(4), pages 883-913, June.
    3. Wiemer Salverda, 2013. "Extending the Top-Income Shares for the Netherlands from 1999 to 2012: An explanatory note," Technical Notes 201304, World Inequality Lab.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Stefan Bach & Giacomo Corneo & Viktor Steiner, 2007. "From Bottom to Top: The Entire Distribution of Market Income in Germany, 1992-2001," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 51, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    2. Bartels, Charlotte, 2019. "Top Incomes in Germany, 1871-2014," EconStor Open Access Articles and Book Chapters, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, pages 669-707.
    3. A. B. Atkinson, 2017. "Pareto and the Upper Tail of the Income Distribution in the UK: 1799 to the Present," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 84(334), pages 129-156, April.
    4. Anthony B. Atkinson & Thomas Piketty & Emmanuel Saez, 2011. "Top Incomes in the Long Run of History," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 49(1), pages 3-71, March.
    5. Visser, Mark & Fasang, Anette Eva, 2018. "Educational assortative mating and couples’ linked late-life employment trajectories," EconStor Open Access Articles and Book Chapters, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, pages 79-90.
    6. Justin van de Ven & Nicolas Hérault, 2019. "The evolution of tax implicit value judgements, redistribution and income inequality in the UK: 1968 to 2015," Working Papers 498, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    7. Jennifer Alonso Garcia & Hazel Bateman & Johan Bonekamp & Ralph Stevens, 2017. "Retirement drawdown defaults: the role of implied endorsement," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/300025, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    8. Meritxell Solé & Guadalupe Souto & Concepció Patxot, 2019. "Sustainability and Adequacy of the Spanish Pension System after the 2013 Reform: A Microsimulation Analysis," Hacienda Pública Española / Review of Public Economics, IEF, vol. 228(1), pages 109-150, March.
    9. Stefan Groot, 2011. "Wages in the Netherlands: a Micro Approach," ERSA conference papers ersa10p1526, European Regional Science Association.
    10. Paul Frijters, 2000. "Persistencies in the Labor Market," Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers 1303, Econometric Society.
    11. repec:aia:aiaswp:wp106 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Jacobs, Bas & Jongen, Egbert L.W. & Zoutman, Floris T., 2017. "Revealed social preferences of Dutch political parties," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 156(C), pages 81-100.
    13. van Klaveren, Maarten & Tijdens, Kea, 2015. "Wages, collective bargaining and recovery from the crisis in the Netherlands," WSI Working Papers 194, The Institute of Economic and Social Research (WSI), Hans Böckler Foundation.
    14. Leigh, Andrew & van der Eng, Pierre, 2009. "Inequality in Indonesia: What can we learn from top incomes?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(1-2), pages 209-212, February.
    15. Emmanuel Saez, 2004. "Reported Incomes and Marginal Tax Rates, 1960-2000: Evidence and Policy Implications," NBER Chapters, in: Tax Policy and the Economy, Volume 18, pages 117-174, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    16. Roine, Jesper & Waldenström, Daniel, 2005. "Top Incomes in Sweden over the Twentieth Century," SSE/EFI Working Paper Series in Economics and Finance 602, Stockholm School of Economics.
    17. Jaewon Lim & Sandy Dall'erba, 2016. "An analysis of the impact of federally-funded investments in science, research and technology across regions and education groups in Arizona," Regional Science Policy & Practice, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 8(4), pages 149-165, November.
    18. Jordá, Vanesa & Niño-Zarazúa, Miguel, 2019. "Global inequality: How large is the effect of top incomes?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 123(C), pages 1-1.
    19. A. B. Atkinson, 2004. "Income Tax and Top Incomes over the Twentieth Century," Hacienda Pública Española / Review of Public Economics, IEF, vol. 168(1), pages 123-141, march.
    20. Andrew Leigh, 2007. "How Closely Do Top Income Shares Track Other Measures of Inequality?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 117(524), pages 619-633, November.
    21. Christoph A. Schaltegger & Christoph Gorgas, 2011. "The Evolution of Top Incomes in Switzerland over the 20th Century," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics (SJES), Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics (SSES), vol. 147(IV), pages 479-519, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Top Incomes; Income Inequality; Wealth Inequality; The Netherlands;
    All these keywords.

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:hal:wilwps:hal-02877004. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Caroline Bauer (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/ .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.