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Astrid Matthey

Personal Details

First Name:Astrid
Middle Name:
Last Name:Matthey
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pma714
http://www.econ.mpg.de/english/staff/staffpage.php?group=esi&name=matthey
Terminal Degree:2007 Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät; Humboldt-Universität Berlin (from RePEc Genealogy)

Research output

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Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Astrid Matthey & Tobias Regner, 2011. "More than outcomes: A cognitive dissonance-based explanation of other-regarding behavior," Jena Economic Research Papers 2011-024, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
  2. Astrid Matthey & Tobias Regner, 2010. "Do I really want to know? A cognitive dissonance-based explanation of other-regarding behavior," Jena Economic Research Papers 2010-077, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
  3. Astrid Matthey & Tobias Regner, 2009. "On the Independence of Observations between Experiments," Jena Economic Research Papers 2009-074, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
  4. Astrid Matthey, 2008. "Manipulating Reference States: the Effect of Attitudes on Utility," Jena Economic Research Papers 2008-044, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
  5. Astrid Matthey, 2008. "Yesterday's expectation of tomorrow determines what you do today: The role of reference-dependent utility from expectations," Jena Economic Research Papers 2008-003, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
  6. Astrid Matthey & Tobias Regner, 2007. "Is observed other-regarding behavior always genuine?," Jena Economic Research Papers 2007-109, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
  7. Astrid Matthey & Nadja Dwenger, 2007. "Don't aim too high: the potential costs of high aspirations," Jena Economic Research Papers 2007-097, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
  8. Astrid Matthey, 2007. "Do Public Banks have a Competitive Advantage?," Jena Economic Research Papers 2007-100, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
  9. Astrid Matthey, 2006. "Imitation with Intention and Memory: an Experiment," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2006-088, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
  10. Astrid Matthey, 2005. "Getting Used to Risks: Reference Dependence and Risk Inclusion," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2005-036, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.

Articles

  1. Matthey, Astrid, 2010. "Imitation with intention and memory: An experiment," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 39(5), pages 585-594, October.
  2. Astrid Matthey, 2010. "Do public banks have a competitive advantage?," The European Journal of Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(1), pages 45-55.
  3. Astrid Matthey, 2010. "The Influence of Priming on Reference States," Games, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 1(1), pages 1-19, March.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Astrid Matthey & Tobias Regner, 2010. "Do I really want to know? A cognitive dissonance-based explanation of other-regarding behavior," Jena Economic Research Papers 2010-077, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Dissonance, ignorance & Lib Dems
      by chris dillow in Stumbling and Mumbling on 2010-11-24 18:36:08
  2. Astrid Matthey & Nadja Dwenger, 2007. "Don't aim too high: the potential costs of high aspirations," Jena Economic Research Papers 2007-097, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Ambition hurts
      by chris dillow in Stumbling and Mumbling on 2007-12-10 21:00:50

Working papers

  1. Astrid Matthey & Tobias Regner, 2010. "Do I really want to know? A cognitive dissonance-based explanation of other-regarding behavior," Jena Economic Research Papers 2010-077, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.

    Cited by:

    1. Matteo. Ploner & Tobias Regner, 2013. "Self-Image and Moral Balancing - An Experimental Analysis," Jena Economic Research Papers 2013-002, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
    2. Alvin Etang Ndip & David Fielding & Stephen Knowles, 2010. "Giving to Africa and Perceptions of Poverty," Working Papers 1008, University of Otago, Department of Economics, revised Aug 2010.
    3. Spiekermann, Kai & Weiss, Arne, 2016. "Objective and subjective compliance: A norm-based explanation of ‘moral wiggle room’," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 96(C), pages 170-183.
    4. Kajackaite, Agne, 2015. "If I close my eyes, nobody will get hurt: The effect of ignorance on performance in a real-effort experiment," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 518-524.
    5. Axel Ockenfels & Peter Werner, 2011. "'Hiding behind a small cake' in a newspaper dictator game," Working Paper Series in Economics 51, University of Cologne, Department of Economics.
    6. Duffy, Sean & Smith, John, 2014. "Cognitive load in the multi-player prisoner's dilemma game: Are there brains in games?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 47-56.
    7. Chen, Chia-Ching & Chiu, I-Ming & Smith, John & Yamada, Tetsuji, 2013. "Too smart to be selfish? Measures of cognitive ability, social preferences, and consistency," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 112-122.
    8. Kandul, Serhiy, 2016. "Ex-post blindness as excuse? The effect of information disclosure on giving," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 91-101.
    9. Francesca Gino & Michael I. Norton & Roberto A. Weber, 2016. "Motivated Bayesians: Feeling Moral While Acting Egoistically," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 30(3), pages 189-212, Summer.
    10. Feiler, Lauren, 2014. "Testing models of information avoidance with binary choice dictator games," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 253-267.
    11. Kandul, Serhiy & Ritov, Ilana, 2017. "Close your eyes and be nice: Deliberate ignorance behind pro-social choices," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 153(C), pages 54-56.
    12. Engelmann, Dirk & Munro, Alistair & Valente, Marieta, 2017. "On the behavioural relevance of optional and mandatory impure public goods," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 134-144.

  2. Astrid Matthey, 2008. "Yesterday's expectation of tomorrow determines what you do today: The role of reference-dependent utility from expectations," Jena Economic Research Papers 2008-003, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.

    Cited by:

    1. Hsiaw, Alice, 2013. "Goal-setting and self-control," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 148(2), pages 601-626.
    2. Fels, Markus, 2015. "On the value of information: Why people reject medical tests," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 1-12.
    3. Quang Nguyen, 2011. "Does nurture matter: Theory and experimental investigation on the effect of working environment on risk and time preferences," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 43(3), pages 245-270, December.

  3. Astrid Matthey & Nadja Dwenger, 2007. "Don't aim too high: the potential costs of high aspirations," Jena Economic Research Papers 2007-097, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.

    Cited by:

    1. Alexander K. Koch, & Julia Nafziger & Anton Suvorov & Jeroen van de Ven, 2012. "Self-Rewards and Personal Motivation," Economics Working Papers 2012-14, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.
    2. Hsiaw, Alice, 2013. "Goal-setting and self-control," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 148(2), pages 601-626.
    3. Koch, Alexander K. & Nafziger, Julia, 2011. "Goals and Psychological Accounting," IZA Discussion Papers 5802, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Quang Nguyen, 2011. "Does nurture matter: Theory and experimental investigation on the effect of working environment on risk and time preferences," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 43(3), pages 245-270, December.

  4. Astrid Matthey, 2007. "Do Public Banks have a Competitive Advantage?," Jena Economic Research Papers 2007-100, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.

    Cited by:

    1. Esref Savas BASCI & Oznur SAKINC, 2014. "Determinants of Bank Profitability in Turkey: An Empirical Analysis on Types of Banking from 2002 to 2012," International Conference on Economic Sciences and Business Administration, Spiru Haret University, vol. 1(1), pages 32-36, December.
    2. Höwer, Daniel, 2016. "The role of bank relationships when firms are financially distressed," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 59-75.
    3. Höwer, Daniel, 2009. "From soft and hard-nosed bankers: bank lending strategies and the survival of financially distressed firms," ZEW Discussion Papers 09-059, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    4. Höwer, Daniel, 2013. "Corporate main bank decision," ZEW Discussion Papers 13-018, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.

  5. Astrid Matthey, 2005. "Getting Used to Risks: Reference Dependence and Risk Inclusion," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2005-036, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Macera, Rosario, 2014. "Dynamic beliefs," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 1-18.

Articles

  1. Astrid Matthey, 2010. "Do public banks have a competitive advantage?," The European Journal of Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(1), pages 45-55.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Astrid Matthey, 2010. "The Influence of Priming on Reference States," Games, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 1(1), pages 1-19, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Daniel J. Benjamin & James J. Choi & Geoffrey W. Fisher, 2010. "Religious Identity and Economic Behavior," NBER Working Papers 15925, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Vanessa Mertins & Susanne Warning, 2013. "Gender Differences in Responsiveness to a Homo Economicus Prime in the Gift-Exchange Game," IAAEU Discussion Papers 201309, Institute of Labour Law and Industrial Relations in the European Union (IAAEU).
    3. Gómez-Miñambres, Joaquín, 2012. "Motivation through goal setting," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 33(6), pages 1223-1239.
    4. Gómez Miñambres, Joaquín, 2011. "Make it challenging : motivation through goal setting," UC3M Working papers. Economics we1123, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía.
    5. Lambarraa, Fatima & Riener, Gerhard, 2012. "On the norms of charitable giving in Islam: A field experiment," DICE Discussion Papers 59, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf Institute for Competition Economics (DICE).
    6. Julija Michailova & Christoph Bühren, 2015. "Money priming and social behavior of natural groups in simple bargaining and dilemma experiments," MAGKS Papers on Economics 201530, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).
    7. Kataria, Mitesh & Regner, Tobias, 2011. "A note on the relationship between television viewing and individual happiness," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 53-58, February.
    8. Lambarraa, Fatima & Riener, Gerhard, 2015. "On the norms of charitable giving in Islam: Two field experiments in Morocco," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 118(C), pages 69-84.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 12 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-EXP: Experimental Economics (9) 2007-01-14 2007-12-08 2008-01-26 2008-01-26 2008-01-26 2008-06-07 2009-10-10 2010-11-20 2011-06-04. Author is listed
  2. NEP-CBE: Cognitive & Behavioural Economics (8) 2007-01-14 2008-01-26 2008-01-26 2008-01-26 2008-06-07 2009-10-10 2010-11-20 2011-06-04. Author is listed
  3. NEP-UPT: Utility Models & Prospect Theory (6) 2007-12-08 2008-01-26 2008-01-26 2008-06-07 2010-11-20 2011-06-04. Author is listed
  4. NEP-EVO: Evolutionary Economics (5) 2007-01-14 2008-01-26 2008-01-26 2010-11-20 2011-06-04. Author is listed
  5. NEP-BAN: Banking (2) 2008-01-05 2008-01-26
  6. NEP-GTH: Game Theory (2) 2008-01-26 2011-06-04
  7. NEP-HPE: History & Philosophy of Economics (2) 2008-06-07 2009-10-10
  8. NEP-NEU: Neuroeconomics (2) 2010-11-20 2011-06-04
  9. NEP-SOC: Social Norms & Social Capital (2) 2008-01-26 2011-06-04
  10. NEP-CBA: Central Banking (1) 2008-01-26
  11. NEP-COM: Industrial Competition (1) 2008-01-26
  12. NEP-HAP: Economics of Happiness (1) 2008-01-26

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