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Astghik Mavisakalyan

Personal Details

First Name:Astghik
Middle Name:
Last Name:Mavisakalyan
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pma1895

Affiliation

Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre
Curtin Business School
Curtin University

Perth, Australia
http://bcec.edu.au/
RePEc:edi:becurau (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles Editorship

Working papers

  1. Alan S Duncan & Daniel Kiely & Astghik Mavisakalyan & Austen Peters & Richard Seymour & Chris Twomey & Loan Vu, 2021. "Stronger Together: Loneliness and social connectedness in Australia," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Report series FS08, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
  2. Steven Bond-Smith & Rebecca Cassells & Alan S Duncan & Astghik Mavisakalyan & Silvia Salazar & Maria Sandoval-Guzman & Richard Seymour & Chris Twomey, 2020. "Green Shoots: Opportunities to grow a sustainable WA economy," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Report series FI05, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
  3. Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Tarverdi, Yashar & Weber, Clas, 2020. "Paradise Postponed: Future Tense and Religiosity," GLO Discussion Paper Series 500, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
  4. Alfred Michael Dockery & Alan S Duncan & Astghik Mavisakalyan & Toan Nguyen & Richard Seymour, 2019. "Finding a Place to Call Home: Immigration in Australia," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Report series FS07, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
  5. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Vladimir Otrachshenko & Olga Popova, 2019. "Can bribery buy health? Evidence from post-communist countries," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1905, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
  6. Rebecca Cassells & Alan S Duncan & Astghik Mavisakalyan & John Phillimore & Richard Seymour & Yashar Tarverdi, 2018. "Future of Work in Australia: Preparing for tomorrow’s world," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Report series FS06, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
  7. Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Minasyan, Anna, 2018. "The role of conflict in sex discrimination: The case of missing girls," GLO Discussion Paper Series 217, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
  8. Steven Bond-Smith & Alan S Duncan & Astghik Mavisakalyan & Richard Seymour & Yashar Tarverdi, 2018. "To Health and Happiness: WA’s Health Industry Future," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Report series FI3, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
  9. Alan Duncan & Mark N Harris & Astghik Mavisakalyan & Toan Nguyen, 2018. "Where do immigrants settle? Assessing the role of immigration policies," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1802, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
  10. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Yashar Tarverdi, 2017. "Oil and Women: A Re-examination," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1706, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
  11. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Yashar Tarverdi, 2017. "Gender and climate change: Do female parliamentarians make a difference?," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1704, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
  12. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Yashar Tarverdi & Clas Weber, 2017. "Talking in the Present, caring for the Future: Language and Environment," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1703, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
  13. Alan Duncan & Astghik Mavisakalyan & Yashar Tarverdi, 2016. "Self-assessed versus statistical evidence of labour market discrimination: The case of indigenous Australians," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2016-70, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  14. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Clas Weber, 2016. "Linguistic relativity and economics," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1605, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
  15. Alan Duncan & Astghik Mavisakalyan & Yashar Taverdi, 2016. "Self-assessed versus statistical evidence of labour market discrimination," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1602, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
  16. Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2016. "Looks matter: Attractiveness and employment in the former soviet union," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1604, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
  17. Rebecca Cassells & Alfred Michael Dockery & Alan S Duncan & Grace Gao & Kenneth Leong & Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2014. "Workforce and skills: Western Australian labour markets in transition," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Report series FWA03, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
  18. Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2012. "Women in cabinet and public health spending: Evidence across countries," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2012-574, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.
  19. Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2011. "Gender in Language and Gender in Employment," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2011-563, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.

Articles

  1. Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Otrachshenko, Vladimir & Popova, Olga, 2021. "Can bribery buy health? Evidence from post-communist countries," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(4), pages 991-1007.
  2. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Anu Rammohan, 2021. "Female autonomy in household decision-making and intimate partner violence: evidence from Pakistan," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 19(1), pages 255-280, March.
  3. Duncan, Alan & Harris, Mark N. & Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Nguyen, Toan, 2020. "Migration flows in commodity cycles: Assessing the role of migration policies," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 127(C).
  4. Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Tarverdi, Yashar, 2019. "Oil and women: A re-examination," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 191-200.
  5. Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Tarverdi, Yashar, 2019. "Gender and climate change: Do female parliamentarians make difference?," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 151-164.
  6. Alan Duncan & Astghik Mavisakalyan & Yashar Tarverdi, 2019. "Self-assessed vs. statistical evidence of racial discrimination: the case of indigenous Australians," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 51(12), pages 1232-1247, March.
  7. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Clas Weber, 2018. "Linguistic Structures And Economic Outcomes," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 32(3), pages 916-939, July.
  8. Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Tarverdi, Yashar & Weber, Clas, 2018. "Talking in the present, caring for the future: Language and environment," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(4), pages 1370-1387.
  9. Mavisakalyan, Astghik, 2018. "Do employers reward physical attractiveness in transition countries?," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 38-52.
  10. Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2017. "Returns to language skills in transition economies," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 416-416, December.
  11. Alessandra Capezio & Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2016. "Women in the boardroom and fraud: Evidence from Australia," Australian Journal of Management, Australian School of Business, vol. 41(4), pages 719-734, November.
  12. Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Meinecke, Juergen, 2016. "The labor market return to academic fraud," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 212-230.
  13. Siobhan Austen & Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2016. "Constitutions and the Political Agency of Women: A Cross-Country Study," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(1), pages 183-210, January.
  14. Alan Duncan & Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2015. "Russian language skills and employment in the Former Soviet Union," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 23(3), pages 625-656, July.
  15. Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2015. "Gender in Language and Gender in Employment," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(4), pages 403-424, December.
  16. Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2014. "Women in cabinet and public health spending: evidence across countries," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 15(3), pages 281-304, August.
  17. Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2013. "Development Priorities in an Emerging Decentralized Economy: The Case of Armenia’s Local Development Programs," Transition Studies Review, Springer;Central Eastern European University Network (CEEUN), vol. 20(1), pages 105-118, April.
  18. Tesfaye A. Gebremedhin & Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2013. "Immigration and Political Instability," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 66(3), pages 317-341, August.
  19. Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2012. "Immigration and School Choice in Australia," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 45(1), pages 29-49, February.
  20. Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2011. "Immigration, Public Education Spending, and Private Schooling," Southern Economic Journal, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 78(2), pages 397-423, October.

Editorship

  1. Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Tarverdi, Yashar, 2019. "Gender and climate change: Do female parliamentarians make difference?," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 151-164.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Tackling gender inequality is ‘crucial' for climate adaptation
      by ? in PreventionWeb News & Announcements on 2020-12-14 23:00:00
    2. Why women’s leadership is key to climate action
      by ? in Forum:Blog on 2022-02-01 12:18:47

Wikipedia or ReplicationWiki mentions

(Only mentions on Wikipedia that link back to a page on a RePEc service)
  1. Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Tarverdi, Yashar, 2019. "Oil and women: A re-examination," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 191-200.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Oil and women: A re-examination (Energy Economics 2019) in ReplicationWiki ()

Working papers

  1. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Vladimir Otrachshenko & Olga Popova, 2019. "Can bribery buy health? Evidence from post-communist countries," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1905, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.

    Cited by:

    1. Yamada, Hiroyuki & Vu, Tien Manh, 2021. "Perception of Bribery, an Anti-Corruption Campaign, and Health Service Utilization in Vietnam," MPRA Paper 108883, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Otrachshenko, Vladimir & Nikolova, Milena & Popova, Olga, 2021. "Double-Edged Sword: Persistent Effects of Communism on Life Satisfaction," IZA Discussion Papers 14712, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Sandra Pellet & Marine de Talancé, 2021. "Is there a gender gap in health among migrants in Russia?," Erudite Working Paper 2021-11, Erudite.

  2. Rebecca Cassells & Alan S Duncan & Astghik Mavisakalyan & John Phillimore & Richard Seymour & Yashar Tarverdi, 2018. "Future of Work in Australia: Preparing for tomorrow’s world," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Report series FS06, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.

    Cited by:

    1. Alfred M. Dockery & John Phillimore & Sherry Bawa, 2021. "Changing demand for STEM skills in Australia and gender implications," Australian Journal of Labour Economics (AJLE), Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School, vol. 24(1), pages 71-110.
    2. Julie Linthorst & André de Waal, 2020. "Megatrends and Disruptors and Their Postulated Impact on Organizations," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 12(20), pages 1-25, October.
    3. Steven Bond-Smith & Alan S Duncan & Astghik Mavisakalyan & Richard Seymour & Yashar Tarverdi, 2018. "To Health and Happiness: WA’s Health Industry Future," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Report series FI3, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
    4. David C. Ribar & Mark Wooden, 2019. "Four Dimensions of Quality in Australian Jobs," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2019n07, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    5. Mark Wooden, 2021. "Job Characteristics and the Changing Nature of Work," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 54(4), pages 494-505, December.

  3. Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Minasyan, Anna, 2018. "The role of conflict in sex discrimination: The case of missing girls," GLO Discussion Paper Series 217, Global Labor Organization (GLO).

    Cited by:

    1. Stephan Klasen, "undated". "From 'MeToo' to Boko Haram: A survey of levels and trends of gender inequality in the world," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 263, Courant Research Centre PEG.
    2. Rodriguez Takeuchi,Laura Kiku, 2020. "Violence and Newborn Health : Estimates for Colombia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 9377, The World Bank.
    3. Orsola Torrisi, 2020. "Armed Conflict and the Timing of Childbearing in Azerbaijan," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 46(3), pages 501-556, September.

  4. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Yashar Tarverdi, 2017. "Oil and Women: A Re-examination," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1706, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.

    Cited by:

    1. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Yashar Tarverdi, 2017. "Gender and climate change: Do female parliamentarians make a difference?," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1704, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
    2. McDonald, Lewis & Üngör, Murat, 2021. "New oil discoveries in Guyana since 2015: Resource curse or resource blessing," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 74(C).

  5. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Yashar Tarverdi, 2017. "Gender and climate change: Do female parliamentarians make a difference?," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1704, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.

    Cited by:

    1. Vu, Trung V., 2021. "Do genetically fragmented societies respond less to global warming? Diversity and climate change policies," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 104(C).
    2. Shaikh M. Eskander & Sam Fankhauser & Joana Setzer, 2020. "Global Lessons from Climate Change Legislation and Litigation," NBER Working Papers 27365, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Sosson Tadadjeu & Alim Belek & Henri Njangang & Marie-Laure Belomo & Brice Kamguia, 2021. "Does women's political empowerment promote public health expenditure in Africa?," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 41(3), pages 1959-1969.
    4. Hannah, Corrie & Giroux, Stacey & Krell, Natasha & Lopus, Sara & McCann, Laura E. & Zimmer, Andrew & Caylor, Kelly K. & Evans, Tom P., 2021. "Has the vision of a gender quota rule been realized for community-based water management committees in Kenya?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 137(C).
    5. Lv, Zhike & Gao, Zhenya, 2021. "The effect of corruption on environmental performance: Does spatial dependence play a role?," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 45(2).
    6. Vu, Trung V., 2020. "Individualism and climate change policies: International evidence," MPRA Paper 98888, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Kerstin Mohr, 2021. "Breaking the Dichotomies: Climate, Coal, and Gender. Paving the Way to a Just Transition. The Example of Colombia," Energies, MDPI, vol. 14(17), pages 1-18, September.
    8. Raufhon Salahodjaev & Barno Abdullaeva & Shakhnoza Tosheva & Arletta Isaeva, 2021. "Female Parliamentarians and the Distribution of National Happiness," Applied Research in Quality of Life, Springer;International Society for Quality-of-Life Studies, vol. 16(4), pages 1571-1585, August.
    9. Neha Bhardwaj Upadhayay, 2020. "Uncovering the proliferation of contingent protection through channels of retaliation, gender and development assistance," Erudite Ph.D Dissertations, Erudite, number ph20-02 edited by Julie Lochard & Catherine Bros.
    10. Unay-Gailhard, İlkay & Bojnec, Štefan, 2021. "Gender and the environmental concerns of young farmers: Do young women farmers make a difference on family farms?," EconStor Open Access Articles and Book Chapters, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, pages 71-82.
    11. Ajoumessi Houmpe Donal, 2021. "CO2 emission in Africa: national leader's professional background effect," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 41(3), pages 1501-1524.

  6. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Yashar Tarverdi & Clas Weber, 2017. "Talking in the Present, caring for the Future: Language and Environment," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1703, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.

    Cited by:

    1. Francis Osei-Tutu & Laurent Weill, 2021. "How language shapes bank risk taking," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 59(1), pages 47-68, April.
    2. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Yashar Tarverdi, 2017. "Gender and climate change: Do female parliamentarians make a difference?," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1704, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
    3. Godlewski, Christophe & Weill, Laurent, 2021. "Are loans cheaper when tomorrow seems further?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 1058-1065.
    4. Lien, Donald & Zhang, Shuo, 2020. "Words matter life: The effect of language on suicide behavior," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 86(C).
    5. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Yashar Tarverdi & Clas Weber, 2020. "Paradise Postponed: Future Tense and Religiosity," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP2001, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
    6. Magdalena Rzemieniak & Monika Wawer, 2021. "Employer Branding in the Context of the Company’s Sustainable Development Strategy from the Perspective of Gender Diversity of Generation Z," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 13(2), pages 1-24, January.
    7. Dar, Shafkat Shafi & Sahu, Sohini, 2022. "The effect of language on financial inclusion," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 106(C).
    8. Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Otrachshenko, Vladimir & Popova, Olga, 2019. "Can bribery buy health? Evidence from post-communist countries," GLO Discussion Paper Series 432, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    9. Silvia Angerer & Daniela Glätzle-Rützler & Philipp Lergetporer & Matthias Sutter, 2021. "The effects of language on patience: an experimental replication study of the linguistic-savings hypothesis in Austria," Journal of the Economic Science Association, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 7(1), pages 88-97, September.
    10. Osei-Tutu, Francis & Weill, Laurent, 2020. "Sex, language, and financial inclusion," BOFIT Discussion Papers 9/2020, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
    11. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Anu Rammohan, 2021. "Female autonomy in household decision-making and intimate partner violence: evidence from Pakistan," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 19(1), pages 255-280, March.
    12. Chen, Josie I. & He, Tai-Sen & Riyanto, Yohanes E., 2019. "The effect of language on economic behavior: Examining the causal link between future tense and time preference in the lab," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 120(C).

  7. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Clas Weber, 2016. "Linguistic relativity and economics," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1605, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.

    Cited by:

    1. Victor Gay & Daniel L. Hicks & Estefania Santacreu-Vasut & Amir Shoham, 2018. "Decomposing culture: an analysis of gender, language, and labor supply in the household," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 16(4), pages 879-909, December.
    2. Drori, Israel & Manos, Ronny & Santacreu-Vasut, Estefania & Shenkar, Oded & Shoham, Amir, 2018. "Language and market inclusivity for women entrepreneurship: the case of microfinance," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 395-415.
    3. Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Tarverdi, Yashar & Weber, Clas, 2018. "Talking in the present, caring for the future: Language and environment," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(4), pages 1370-1387.

  8. Rebecca Cassells & Alfred Michael Dockery & Alan S Duncan & Grace Gao & Kenneth Leong & Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2014. "Workforce and skills: Western Australian labour markets in transition," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Report series FWA03, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.

    Cited by:

    1. Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Tarverdi, Yashar, 2019. "Oil and women: A re-examination," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 191-200.
    2. Duncan, Alan & Harris, Mark N. & Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Nguyen, Toan, 2020. "Migration flows in commodity cycles: Assessing the role of migration policies," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 127(C).

  9. Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2012. "Women in cabinet and public health spending: Evidence across countries," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2012-574, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Tarverdi, Yashar, 2019. "Oil and women: A re-examination," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 191-200.
    2. Ozdamar, Oznur, 2017. "Gendered economic policy making: The case of public expenditures on family allowances," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal (2007-2020), Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW Kiel), vol. 11, pages 1-28.
    3. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Yashar Tarverdi, 2017. "Gender and climate change: Do female parliamentarians make a difference?," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1704, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
    4. Sosson Tadadjeu & Alim Belek & Henri Njangang & Marie-Laure Belomo & Brice Kamguia, 2021. "Does women's political empowerment promote public health expenditure in Africa?," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 41(3), pages 1959-1969.
    5. Raufhon Salahodjaev & Barno Abdullaeva & Shakhnoza Tosheva & Arletta Isaeva, 2021. "Female Parliamentarians and the Distribution of National Happiness," Applied Research in Quality of Life, Springer;International Society for Quality-of-Life Studies, vol. 16(4), pages 1571-1585, August.
    6. Neha Bhardwaj Upadhayay, 2020. "Uncovering the proliferation of contingent protection through channels of retaliation, gender and development assistance," Erudite Ph.D Dissertations, Erudite, number ph20-02 edited by Julie Lochard & Catherine Bros.
    7. Kodila-Tedika, Oasis, 2018. "Does Masculinity Matter for Female Leaders? Evidence in cross-section countries," MPRA Paper 84776, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Kuliomina, Jekaterina, 2021. "Do personal characteristics of councilors affect municipal budget allocation?," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 70(C).
    9. Kodila-Tedika, Oasis & Khalifa, Sherif & Konso Mulali, Ben, 2020. "Who Becomes Minister in an Autocratic Regime? Evidence From DRC," MPRA Paper 103022, University Library of Munich, Germany.

  10. Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2011. "Gender in Language and Gender in Employment," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2011-563, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Tarverdi, Yashar, 2019. "Oil and women: A re-examination," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 191-200.
    2. Victor Gay & Daniel L. Hicks & Estefania Santacreu-Vasut & Amir Shoham, 2018. "Decomposing culture: an analysis of gender, language, and labor supply in the household," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 16(4), pages 879-909, December.
    3. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Yashar Tarverdi, 2017. "Gender and climate change: Do female parliamentarians make a difference?," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1704, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
    4. Ginsburgh, Victor & Weber, Shlomo, 2018. "The Economics of Language," CEPR Discussion Papers 13002, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Jakiela,Pamela & Ozier,Owen, 2018. "Gendered language," Policy Research Working Paper Series 8464, The World Bank.
    6. Godlewski, Christophe & Weill, Laurent, 2021. "Are loans cheaper when tomorrow seems further?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 1058-1065.
    7. Getchell, Kristen M. & Beitelspacher, Lauren Skinner, 2020. "Better marketing for female marketers: Gendered language in the Forbes CMO list," Business Horizons, Elsevier, vol. 63(5), pages 607-617.
    8. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Yashar Tarverdi & Clas Weber, 2020. "Paradise Postponed: Future Tense and Religiosity," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP2001, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
    9. Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Tarverdi, Yashar & Weber, Clas, 2018. "Talking in the present, caring for the future: Language and environment," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(4), pages 1370-1387.
    10. Deniz Güvercin, 2020. "Women in Politics and Child Labor: an Instrumental Variable Approach," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 32(4), pages 873-888, September.
    11. Lewis Davis & Jia Gao, 2020. "Preferences or Patriarchy: Why Do Religious Women Work Less?," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 147(1), pages 287-310, January.
    12. van der Velde, Lucas & Tyrowicz, Joanna & Siwinska, Joanna, 2015. "Language and (the estimates of) the gender wage gap," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 136(C), pages 165-170.
    13. Beblo, Miriam & Görges, Luise & Markowsky, Eva, 2020. "Gender Matters in Language and Economic Behaviour: Can we Measure a Causal Cognition Effect of Speaking?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(C).
    14. Osei-Tutu, Francis & Weill, Laurent, 2020. "Sex, language, and financial inclusion," BOFIT Discussion Papers 9/2020, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
    15. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Clas Weber, 2018. "Linguistic Structures And Economic Outcomes," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 32(3), pages 916-939, July.
    16. Davis, Lewis & Reynolds, Megan, 2018. "Gendered language and the educational gender gap," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 168(C), pages 46-48.
    17. Davis, Lewis S. & Williamson, Claudia R., 2019. "Does individualism promote gender equality?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 123(C), pages 1-1.

Articles

  1. Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Otrachshenko, Vladimir & Popova, Olga, 2021. "Can bribery buy health? Evidence from post-communist countries," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(4), pages 991-1007.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Tarverdi, Yashar, 2019. "Oil and women: A re-examination," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 191-200.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Tarverdi, Yashar, 2019. "Gender and climate change: Do female parliamentarians make difference?," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 151-164.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  4. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Clas Weber, 2018. "Linguistic Structures And Economic Outcomes," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 32(3), pages 916-939, July.

    Cited by:

    1. Francis Osei-Tutu & Laurent Weill, 2021. "How language shapes bank risk taking," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 59(1), pages 47-68, April.
    2. Godlewski, Christophe & Weill, Laurent, 2021. "Are loans cheaper when tomorrow seems further?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 1058-1065.
    3. Diemo Urbig & Katrin Muehlfeld & Vivien Procher & Arjen Witteloostuijn, 2020. "Strategic Decision-Making in a Global Context: The Comprehension Effect of Foreign Language Use on Cooperation," Management International Review, Springer, vol. 60(3), pages 351-385, June.
    4. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Yashar Tarverdi & Clas Weber, 2020. "Paradise Postponed: Future Tense and Religiosity," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP2001, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
    5. Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Tarverdi, Yashar & Weber, Clas, 2018. "Talking in the present, caring for the future: Language and environment," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(4), pages 1370-1387.
    6. Tang, Jintong & Yang, Jun & Ye, Wenping & Khan, Shaji A., 2021. "Now is the time: The effects of linguistic time reference and national time orientation on innovative new ventures," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 36(5).
    7. Chi, Jianxin Daniel & Su, Xunhua & Tang, Yun & Xu, Bin, 2020. "Is language an economic institution? Evidence from R&D investment," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 62(C).
    8. Beblo, Miriam & Görges, Luise & Markowsky, Eva, 2020. "Gender Matters in Language and Economic Behaviour: Can we Measure a Causal Cognition Effect of Speaking?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(C).

  5. Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Tarverdi, Yashar & Weber, Clas, 2018. "Talking in the present, caring for the future: Language and environment," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(4), pages 1370-1387.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  6. Mavisakalyan, Astghik, 2018. "Do employers reward physical attractiveness in transition countries?," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 38-52.

    Cited by:

    1. Nazim Habibov & Alena Auchynnikava & Rong Luo & Lida Fan, 2019. "A healthy weight improves life satisfaction," International Journal of Health Planning and Management, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 34(1), pages 396-413, January.
    2. Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Minasyan, Anna, 2018. "The role of conflict in sex discrimination: The case of missing girls," GLO Discussion Paper Series 217, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    3. Dilmaghani, Maryam, 2020. "Beauty perks: Physical appearance, earnings, and fringe benefits," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 38(C).

  7. Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2017. "Returns to language skills in transition economies," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 416-416, December.

    Cited by:

    1. Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Minasyan, Anna, 2018. "The role of conflict in sex discrimination: The case of missing girls," GLO Discussion Paper Series 217, Global Labor Organization (GLO).

  8. Alessandra Capezio & Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2016. "Women in the boardroom and fraud: Evidence from Australia," Australian Journal of Management, Australian School of Business, vol. 41(4), pages 719-734, November.

    Cited by:

    1. Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Tarverdi, Yashar, 2019. "Oil and women: A re-examination," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 191-200.
    2. Monica Ramos Montesdeoca & Agustín J. Sánchez Medina & Felix Blázquez Santana, 2019. "Research Topics in Accounting Fraud in the 21st Century: A State of the Art," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 11(6), pages 1-31, March.
    3. Pornsit Jiraporn & Pandej Chintrakarn & Shenghui Tong & Sirimon Treepongkaruna, 2018. "Does board independence substitute for external audit quality? Evidence from an exogenous regulatory shock," Australian Journal of Management, Australian School of Business, vol. 43(1), pages 27-41, February.
    4. Christofer Adrian & Sue Wright, 2020. "Perceptions of shareholders and directors on corporate governance: what we learn about director primacy," Accounting and Finance, Accounting and Finance Association of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 60(S1), pages 1209-1236, April.
    5. Al-Shaer, Habiba & Zaman, Mahbub, 2016. "Board gender diversity and sustainability reporting quality," Journal of Contemporary Accounting and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 210-222.
    6. Badru, Bazeet O. & Ahmad-Zaluki, Nurwati A. & Wan-Hussin, Wan Nordin, 2017. "Board characteristics and the amount of capital raised in the Malaysian IPO market," Journal of Multinational Financial Management, Elsevier, vol. 42, pages 37-55.
    7. Sultan Sikandar Mirza & Muhammad Ansar Majeed & Tanveer Ahsan, 2020. "Board gender diversity, competitive pressure and investment efficiency in Chinese private firms," Eurasian Business Review, Springer;Eurasia Business and Economics Society, vol. 10(3), pages 417-440, September.
    8. Alaa Mansour Zalata & Collins Ntim & Ahmed Aboud & Ernest Gyapong, 2019. "Female CEOs and Core Earnings Quality: New Evidence on the Ethics Versus Risk-Aversion Puzzle," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 160(2), pages 515-534, December.
    9. Adrian Gepp & Kuldeep Kumar & Sukanto Bhattacharya, 2021. "Lifting the numbers game: identifying key input variables and a best‐performing model to detect financial statement fraud," Accounting and Finance, Accounting and Finance Association of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 61(3), pages 4601-4638, September.
    10. Joseph A Crawford & Sarah Dawkins & Angela Martin & Gemma Lewis, 2020. "Putting the leader back into authentic leadership: Reconceptualising and rethinking leaders," Australian Journal of Management, Australian School of Business, vol. 45(1), pages 114-133, February.
    11. Alaa Mansour Zalata & Collins G. Ntim & Mostafa Hussien Alsohagy & John Malagila, 2022. "Gender diversity and earnings management: the case of female directors with financial background," Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting, Springer, vol. 58(1), pages 101-136, January.
    12. Nguyen, Tuan & Nguyen, An & Nguyen, Mau & Truong, Thuyen, 2021. "Is national governance quality a key moderator of the boardroom gender diversity–firm performance relationship? International evidence from a multi-hierarchical analysis," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 370-390.
    13. Rakesh Pandey & Pallab Kumar Biswas & Muhammad Jahangir Ali & Mansi Mansi, 2020. "Female directors on the board and cost of debt: evidence from Australia," Accounting and Finance, Accounting and Finance Association of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 60(4), pages 4031-4060, December.
    14. Nhat Minh Tran & Thu Thuy Nguyen & Thi Phuong Linh Nguyen & Anh Trong Vu & Thi Thanh Hoa Phan & Thi Hong Tham Nguyen & Ngoc Diep Do & Anh Tuan Phan, 2022. "Female Managers and Corruption in SMEs: A Comparison Between Family and Nonfamily SMEs in Vietnam," SAGE Open, , vol. 12(1), pages 21582440221, March.
    15. Stewart Jones & Nurul Alam, 2019. "A machine learning analysis of citation impact among selected Pacific Basin journals," Accounting and Finance, Accounting and Finance Association of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 59(4), pages 2509-2552, December.
    16. Sultan Sikandar Mirza & Muhammad Ansar Majeed & Tanveer Ahsan, 2020. "Board gender diversity, competitive pressure and investment efficiency in Chinese private firms," Post-Print hal-02956320, HAL.
    17. Khaldoon Aldaoud, 2019. "The Impact of Board Independence, Women on Board and Auditor Independence on the Fraud: Evidence from Jordanian Firms," Proceedings of International Academic Conferences 9710771, International Institute of Social and Economic Sciences.
    18. Jinghui Sun & Pamela Kent & Baolei Qi & Jiwei Wang, 2019. "Chief financial officer demographic characteristics and fraudulent financial reporting in China," Accounting and Finance, Accounting and Finance Association of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 59(4), pages 2705-2734, December.
    19. Kodila-Tedika, Oasis, 2018. "Does Masculinity Matter for Female Leaders? Evidence in cross-section countries," MPRA Paper 84776, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    20. Ernest Gyapong & Ammad Ahmed & Collins G Ntim & Muhammad Nadeem, 2021. "Board gender diversity and dividend policy in Australian listed firms: the effect of ownership concentration," Asia Pacific Journal of Management, Springer, vol. 38(2), pages 603-643, June.
    21. Nguyen, Thi Hong Hanh & Ntim, Collins G. & Malagila, John K., 2020. "Women on corporate boards and corporate financial and non-financial performance: A systematic literature review and future research agenda," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 71(C).
    22. Mihaela Ionascu & Ion Ionascu & Marian Sacarin & Mihaela Minu, 2018. "Women on Boards and Financial Performance: Evidence from a European Emerging Market," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 10(5), pages 1-18, May.
    23. Viput Ongsakul & Anutchanat Jaroenjitrkam & Sirimon Treepongkaruna & Pornsit Jiraporn, 2022. "Does board gender diversity reduce ‘CEO luck’?," Accounting and Finance, Accounting and Finance Association of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 62(1), pages 243-260, March.
    24. Marzena Baker & Muhammad Ali & Erica French, 2019. "Effectiveness of gender equality initiatives in project-based organizations in Australia," Australian Journal of Management, Australian School of Business, vol. 44(3), pages 425-442, August.
    25. Nirosha Hewa Wellalage & Stuart Locke, 2018. "Do female directors create value for the shareholders? Case study of New Zealand publicly listed companies," International Journal of Corporate Governance, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 9(4), pages 347-371.
    26. Balasingham Balachandran & Sutharson Kanapathippillai & Chandrasekhar Krishnamurti & Michael Theobald & Eswaran Velayutham, 2017. "The issuance of warrants in rights offerings: Agency costs and signaling effects," Australian Journal of Management, Australian School of Business, vol. 42(4), pages 608-636, November.

  9. Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Meinecke, Juergen, 2016. "The labor market return to academic fraud," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 212-230.

    Cited by:

    1. Mitchell Berlin & Gregory P. Nini & Edison Yu, 2019. "Concentration of Control Rights in Leveraged Loan Syndicates," Working Papers 19-41, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    2. Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Otrachshenko, Vladimir & Popova, Olga, 2019. "Can bribery buy health? Evidence from post-communist countries," GLO Discussion Paper Series 432, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    3. Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Minasyan, Anna, 2018. "The role of conflict in sex discrimination: The case of missing girls," GLO Discussion Paper Series 217, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    4. Mavisakalyan, Astghik, 2018. "Do employers reward physical attractiveness in transition countries?," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 38-52.
    5. Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2016. "Looks matter: Attractiveness and employment in the former soviet union," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1604, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.

  10. Siobhan Austen & Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2016. "Constitutions and the Political Agency of Women: A Cross-Country Study," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(1), pages 183-210, January.

    Cited by:

    1. Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Tarverdi, Yashar, 2019. "Oil and women: A re-examination," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 191-200.
    2. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Yashar Tarverdi, 2017. "Gender and climate change: Do female parliamentarians make a difference?," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1704, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
    3. Kodila-Tedika, Oasis & Mulunda Kabange, Martin, 2018. "Constitutional instability and Poverty: Some Empirical Evidence," MPRA Paper 84501, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Kodila-Tedika, Oasis, 2018. "Does Masculinity Matter for Female Leaders? Evidence in cross-section countries," MPRA Paper 84776, University Library of Munich, Germany.

  11. Alan Duncan & Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2015. "Russian language skills and employment in the Former Soviet Union," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 23(3), pages 625-656, July.

    Cited by:

    1. Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2017. "Returns to language skills in transition economies," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 416-416, December.
    2. Brian Fabo & Miroslav Beblavý & Karolien Lenaerts, 2017. "The importance of foreign language skills in the labour markets of Central and Eastern Europe: assessment based on data from online job portals," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 44(3), pages 487-508, August.
    3. Fujii, Tomoki & Nakajima, Maki & Xu, Sijia, 2021. "Teaching in the Right Context: Textbook Supply Program, Language, and Vocabulary Ability in Vietnam," Economics and Statistics Working Papers 2-2021, Singapore Management University, School of Economics.
    4. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Clas Weber, 2016. "Linguistic relativity and economics," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1605, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
    5. Wang, Haining & Cheng, Zhiming & Smyth, Russell, 2016. "Language and consumption," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 135-151.
    6. Wang, Haining & Cheng, Zhiming & Smyth, Russell, 2019. "Health outcomes, health inequality and Mandarin proficiency in urban China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 1-1.
    7. Haining Wang & Zhiming Cheng & Russell Smyth, 2016. "Language, Health Outcomes and Health Inequality," Monash Economics Working Papers 43-16, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    8. Dovì, Max-Sebastian, 2019. "Does higher language proficiency decrease the probability of unemployment? Evidence from China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 1-11.
    9. Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Minasyan, Anna, 2018. "The role of conflict in sex discrimination: The case of missing girls," GLO Discussion Paper Series 217, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    10. Michele Gazzola & Daniele Mazzacani, 2019. "Foreign language skills and employment status of European natives: evidence from Germany, Italy and Spain," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 46(4), pages 713-740, November.
    11. Mavisakalyan, Astghik, 2018. "Do employers reward physical attractiveness in transition countries?," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 38-52.
    12. Alejandro Donado, 2017. "Foreign Languages and their Impact on Unemployment," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 31(3), pages 265-287, September.
    13. Wang, Haining & Smyth, Russell & Cheng, Zhiming, 2017. "The economic returns to proficiency in English in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 91-104.
    14. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Clas Weber, 2018. "Linguistic Structures And Economic Outcomes," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 32(3), pages 916-939, July.
    15. Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2016. "Looks matter: Attractiveness and employment in the former soviet union," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1604, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.

  12. Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2015. "Gender in Language and Gender in Employment," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(4), pages 403-424, December.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  13. Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2014. "Women in cabinet and public health spending: evidence across countries," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 15(3), pages 281-304, August.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  14. Tesfaye A. Gebremedhin & Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2013. "Immigration and Political Instability," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 66(3), pages 317-341, August.

    Cited by:

    1. Laila Touhami Morghem & Khawlah Ali Abdalla Spetan, 2020. "Determinants of International Migration: An Applied Study on Selected Arab Countries (1995-2017)," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 10(2), pages 6-19.
    2. Bortoletto, Gianluca, 2022. "The link between migratory background and crime perceptions. A repeated cross-sectional analysis with household data," MPRA Paper 112488, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Dowon Kim & Dongwon Lee, 2021. "Immigration and the pattern of public spending: evidence from OECD countries," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 28(4), pages 1014-1034, August.
    4. David Stadelmann & Marco Portmann & Reiner Eichenberger, 2014. "Military careers of politicians matter for national security policy," CREMA Working Paper Series 2014-18, Center for Research in Economics, Management and the Arts (CREMA).
    5. Stelios Roupakias & Spiridoula Dimou, 2021. "Immigration, diversity and institutions," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 74(3), pages 396-416, August.
    6. David Stadelmann & Marco Portmann & Reiner Eichenberger, 2018. "Military Service of Politicians, Public Policy, and Parliamentary Decisions," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 64(4), pages 639-666.
    7. Alfred Michael Dockery & Alan S Duncan & Astghik Mavisakalyan & Toan Nguyen & Richard Seymour, 2019. "Finding a Place to Call Home: Immigration in Australia," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Report series FS07, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
    8. Daryna Grechyna, 2018. "Shall We Riot Too? The Geographical Neighbor Impact on Political Instability," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 71(4), pages 581-612, November.

  15. Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2012. "Immigration and School Choice in Australia," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 45(1), pages 29-49, February.

    Cited by:

    1. Tue Gørgens & Chris Ryan & Guochang Zhao, 2020. "Private School Usage in Australia 1975–2010: Evidence from the Household Expenditure Surveys," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 53(2), pages 198-213, June.
    2. Ortega, Francesc & Tanaka, Ryuichi, 2015. "Immigration and the Political Economy of Public Education: Recent Perspectives," IZA Discussion Papers 8778, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Asadullah, Niaz, 2018. "Madrasah for Girls and Private School for Boys? The Determinants of School Type Choice in Rural and Urban Indonesia," IZA Discussion Papers 11362, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Alfred Michael Dockery & Alan S Duncan & Astghik Mavisakalyan & Toan Nguyen & Richard Seymour, 2019. "Finding a Place to Call Home: Immigration in Australia," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Report series FS07, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.

  16. Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2011. "Immigration, Public Education Spending, and Private Schooling," Southern Economic Journal, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 78(2), pages 397-423, October.

    Cited by:

    1. Dowon Kim & Dongwon Lee, 2021. "Immigration and the pattern of public spending: evidence from OECD countries," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 28(4), pages 1014-1034, August.
    2. Stelios Roupakias & Spiridoula Dimou, 2021. "Immigration, diversity and institutions," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 74(3), pages 396-416, August.
    3. Ivo Bischoff & Ferry Prasetyia, 2015. "Determinants of local public expenditures on education: empirical evidence for Indonesian districts between 2005 and 2012," MAGKS Papers on Economics 201532, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).
    4. Jinno, Masatoshi & Yasuoka, Masaya, 2021. "Endogenous fertility and unemployment -Considering the effects of immigrants through school system," MPRA Paper 106379, University Library of Munich, Germany.

More information

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Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 18 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-ENV: Environmental Economics (4) 2017-08-06 2017-12-11 2018-07-09 2020-12-14
  2. NEP-EVO: Evolutionary Economics (4) 2017-02-26 2018-07-09 2020-04-06 2020-08-17
  3. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (4) 2011-11-07 2017-12-11 2018-06-18 2020-01-06
  4. NEP-CIS: Confederation of Independent States (3) 2017-02-26 2018-07-09 2019-02-11
  5. NEP-ENE: Energy Economics (3) 2017-08-06 2017-12-11 2020-12-14
  6. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (3) 2018-06-18 2020-01-06 2020-04-06
  7. NEP-CWA: Central & Western Asia (2) 2017-02-26 2018-07-09
  8. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (2) 2011-11-07 2012-05-15
  9. NEP-DEV: Development (2) 2018-07-09 2019-02-11
  10. NEP-GEN: Gender (2) 2017-12-11 2018-07-09
  11. NEP-KNM: Knowledge Management & Knowledge Economy (2) 2018-07-09 2018-07-09
  12. NEP-MIG: Economics of Human Migration (2) 2018-06-18 2020-01-06
  13. NEP-POL: Positive Political Economics (2) 2017-12-11 2018-07-09
  14. NEP-REG: Regulation (2) 2017-12-11 2018-07-09
  15. NEP-HAP: Economics of Happiness (1) 2019-02-11
  16. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (1) 2012-05-15
  17. NEP-HPE: History & Philosophy of Economics (1) 2017-02-26
  18. NEP-INT: International Trade (1) 2018-06-18
  19. NEP-PAY: Payment Systems & Financial Technology (1) 2018-06-18
  20. NEP-RES: Resource Economics (1) 2020-12-14
  21. NEP-SOC: Social Norms & Social Capital (1) 2022-01-10
  22. NEP-TRA: Transition Economics (1) 2017-02-26

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