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Astghik Mavisakalyan

Personal Details

First Name:Astghik
Middle Name:
Last Name:Mavisakalyan
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pma1895

Affiliation

Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre
Curtin Business School
Curtin University

Perth, Australia
http://bcec.edu.au/

: +61 8 9266 1744

GPO Box U1987, Perth WA 6845
RePEc:edi:becurau (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Yashar Tarverdi, 2017. "Oil and Women: A Re-examination," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1706, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
  2. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Yashar Tarverdi, 2017. "Gender and climate change: Do female parliamentarians make a difference?," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1704, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
  3. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Yashar Tarverdi & Clas Weber, 2017. "Talking in the Present, caring for the Future: Language and Environment," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1703, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
  4. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Clas Weber, 2016. "Linguistic relativity and economics," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1605, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
  5. Alan Duncan & Astghik Mavisakalyan & Yashar Taverdi, 2016. "Self-assessed versus statistical evidence of labour market discrimination," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1602, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
  6. Alan Duncan & Astghik Mavisakalyan & Yashar Tarverdi, 2016. "Self-assessed versus statistical evidence of labour market discrimination The case of indigenous Australians," WIDER Working Paper Series 070, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  7. Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2016. "Looks matter: Attractiveness and employment in the former soviet union," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1604, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
  8. Rebecca Cassells & Alfred Michael Dockery & Alan S Duncan & Grace Gao & Kenneth Leong & Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2014. "Workforce and skills: Western Australian labour markets in transition," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Report series FWA03, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
  9. Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2012. "Women in cabinet and public health spending: Evidence across countries," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2012-574, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.
  10. Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2011. "Gender in Language and Gender in Employment," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2011-563, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.

Articles

  1. Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2017. "Returns to language skills in transition economies," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 416-416, December.
  2. Alessandra Capezio & Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2016. "Women in the boardroom and fraud: Evidence from Australia," Australian Journal of Management, Australian School of Business, vol. 41(4), pages 719-734, November.
  3. Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Meinecke, Juergen, 2016. "The labor market return to academic fraud," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 212-230.
  4. Siobhan Austen & Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2016. "Constitutions and the Political Agency of Women: A Cross-Country Study," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(1), pages 183-210, January.
  5. Alan Duncan & Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2015. "Russian language skills and employment in the Former Soviet Union," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 23(3), pages 625-656, July.
  6. Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2015. "Gender in Language and Gender in Employment," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(4), pages 403-424, December.
  7. Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2014. "Women in cabinet and public health spending: evidence across countries," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 15(3), pages 281-304, August.
  8. Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2013. "Development Priorities in an Emerging Decentralized Economy: The Case of Armenia’s Local Development Programs," Transition Studies Review, Springer;Central Eastern European University Network (CEEUN), vol. 20(1), pages 105-118, April.
  9. Tesfaye A. Gebremedhin & Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2013. "Immigration and Political Instability," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 66(3), pages 317-341, August.
  10. Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2012. "Immigration and School Choice in Australia," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 45(1), pages 29-49, February.
  11. Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2011. "Immigration, Public Education Spending, and Private Schooling," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 78(2), pages 397-423, October.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Yashar Tarverdi & Clas Weber, 2017. "Talking in the Present, caring for the Future: Language and Environment," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1703, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.

    Cited by:

    1. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Yashar Tarverdi, 2017. "Gender and climate change: Do female parliamentarians make a difference?," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1704, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.

  2. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Clas Weber, 2016. "Linguistic relativity and economics," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1605, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.

    Cited by:

    1. Gay, Victor & Hicks, Daniel L. & Santacreu-Vasut, Estefania & Shoham, Amir, 2017. "Decomposing culture: An analysis of gender, language, and labor supply in the household," MPRA Paper 77637, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Yashar Tarverdi & Clas Weber, 2017. "Talking in the Present, caring for the Future: Language and Environment," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1703, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.

  3. Rebecca Cassells & Alfred Michael Dockery & Alan S Duncan & Grace Gao & Kenneth Leong & Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2014. "Workforce and skills: Western Australian labour markets in transition," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Report series FWA03, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.

    Cited by:

    1. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Yashar Tarverdi, 2017. "Oil and Women: A Re-examination," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1706, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.

  4. Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2012. "Women in cabinet and public health spending: Evidence across countries," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2012-574, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Ozdamar, Oznur, 2017. "Gendered economic policy making: The case of public expenditures on family allowances," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 11, pages 1-28.
    2. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Yashar Tarverdi, 2017. "Gender and climate change: Do female parliamentarians make a difference?," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1704, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
    3. Kodila-Tedika, Oasis, 2018. "Does Masculinity Matter for Female Leaders? Evidence in cross-section countries," MPRA Paper 84776, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Yashar Tarverdi, 2017. "Oil and Women: A Re-examination," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1706, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.

  5. Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2011. "Gender in Language and Gender in Employment," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2011-563, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Yashar Tarverdi, 2017. "Gender and climate change: Do female parliamentarians make a difference?," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1704, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
    2. van der Velde, Lucas & Tyrowicz, Joanna & Siwinska, Joanna, 2015. "Language and (the estimates of) the gender wage gap," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 136(C), pages 165-170.
    3. Gay, Victor & Hicks, Daniel L. & Santacreu-Vasut, Estefania & Shoham, Amir, 2017. "Decomposing culture: An analysis of gender, language, and labor supply in the household," MPRA Paper 77637, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Yashar Tarverdi, 2017. "Oil and Women: A Re-examination," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1706, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
    5. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Yashar Tarverdi & Clas Weber, 2017. "Talking in the Present, caring for the Future: Language and Environment," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1703, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.

Articles

  1. Alessandra Capezio & Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2016. "Women in the boardroom and fraud: Evidence from Australia," Australian Journal of Management, Australian School of Business, vol. 41(4), pages 719-734, November.

    Cited by:

    1. Badru, Bazeet O. & Ahmad-Zaluki, Nurwati A. & Wan-Hussin, Wan Nordin, 2017. "Board characteristics and the amount of capital raised in the Malaysian IPO market," Journal of Multinational Financial Management, Elsevier, vol. 42, pages 37-55.
    2. Kodila-Tedika, Oasis, 2018. "Does Masculinity Matter for Female Leaders? Evidence in cross-section countries," MPRA Paper 84776, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Yashar Tarverdi, 2017. "Oil and Women: A Re-examination," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1706, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.

  2. Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Meinecke, Juergen, 2016. "The labor market return to academic fraud," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 212-230.

    Cited by:

    1. Berlin, Mitchell & Nini, Gregory P. & Yu, Edison, 2017. "Concentration of Control Rights in Leveraged Loan Syndicates," Working Papers 17-22, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    2. Mavisakalyan, Astghik, 2018. "Do employers reward physical attractiveness in transition countries?," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 38-52.
    3. Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2016. "Looks matter: Attractiveness and employment in the former soviet union," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1604, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.

  3. Siobhan Austen & Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2016. "Constitutions and the Political Agency of Women: A Cross-Country Study," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(1), pages 183-210, January.

    Cited by:

    1. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Yashar Tarverdi, 2017. "Gender and climate change: Do female parliamentarians make a difference?," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1704, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
    2. Kodila-Tedika, Oasis & Mulunda Kabange, Martin, 2018. "Constitutional instability and Poverty: Some Empirical Evidence," MPRA Paper 84501, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Kodila-Tedika, Oasis, 2018. "Does Masculinity Matter for Female Leaders? Evidence in cross-section countries," MPRA Paper 84776, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Yashar Tarverdi, 2017. "Oil and Women: A Re-examination," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1706, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.

  4. Alan Duncan & Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2015. "Russian language skills and employment in the Former Soviet Union," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 23(3), pages 625-656, July.

    Cited by:

    1. Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2017. "Returns to language skills in transition economies," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 416-416, December.
    2. Brian Fabo & Miroslav Beblavý & Karolien Lenaerts, 2017. "The importance of foreign language skills in the labour markets of Central and Eastern Europe: assessment based on data from online job portals," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 44(3), pages 487-508, August.
    3. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Clas Weber, 2016. "Linguistic relativity and economics," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1605, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
    4. Wang, Haining & Cheng, Zhiming & Smyth, Russell, 2016. "Language and consumption," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 135-151.
    5. Haining Wang & Zhiming Cheng & Russell Smyth, 2016. "Language, Health Outcomes and Health Inequality," Monash Economics Working Papers 43-16, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    6. Mavisakalyan, Astghik, 2018. "Do employers reward physical attractiveness in transition countries?," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 38-52.
    7. Alejandro Donado, 2017. "Foreign Languages and their Impact on Unemployment," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 31(3), pages 265-287, September.
    8. Wang, Haining & Smyth, Russell & Cheng, Zhiming, 2017. "The economic returns to proficiency in English in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 91-104.
    9. Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2016. "Looks matter: Attractiveness and employment in the former soviet union," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1604, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.

  5. Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2015. "Gender in Language and Gender in Employment," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(4), pages 403-424, December.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  6. Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2014. "Women in cabinet and public health spending: evidence across countries," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 15(3), pages 281-304, August.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  7. Tesfaye A. Gebremedhin & Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2013. "Immigration and Political Instability," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 66(3), pages 317-341, August.

    Cited by:

    1. David Stadelmann & Marco Portmann & Reiner Eichenberger, 2014. "Military careers of politicians matter for national security policy," CREMA Working Paper Series 2014-18, Center for Research in Economics, Management and the Arts (CREMA).

  8. Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2012. "Immigration and School Choice in Australia," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 45(1), pages 29-49, February.

    Cited by:

    1. Ortega, Francesc & Tanaka, Ryuichi, 2015. "Immigration and the Political Economy of Public Education: Recent Perspectives," IZA Discussion Papers 8778, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

  9. Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2011. "Immigration, Public Education Spending, and Private Schooling," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 78(2), pages 397-423, October.

    Cited by:

    1. Murray, Thomas J., 2016. "Public or private? The influence of immigration on native schooling choices in the United States," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 268-283.
    2. Kalyan Chakraborty & Richard K. Harper, 2017. "Measuring the Impact of Socio-Economic Factors on School Efficiency in Australia," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 45(2), pages 163-179, June.
    3. Richard Cebula & Christopher Duquette & Franklin Mixon, 2013. "Factors Influencing the State-Level Settlement Pattern of the Undocumented Immigrant Population in the United States," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 41(3), pages 203-213, September.
    4. Tesfaye A. Gebremedhin & Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2013. "Immigration and Political Instability," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 66(3), pages 317-341, August.
    5. Ivo Bischoff & Ferry Prasetyia, 2015. "Determinants of local public expenditures on education: empirical evidence for Indonesian districts between 2005 and 2012," MAGKS Papers on Economics 201532, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).
    6. Marchiori, Luca & Pieretti, Patrice & Zou, Benteng, 2016. "Immigration, occupational choice and public employment," Center for Mathematical Economics Working Papers 516, Center for Mathematical Economics, Bielefeld University.
    7. Richard J. Cebula, 2016. "Give me sanctuary! The impact of personal freedom afforded by sanctuary cities on the 2010 undocumented immigrant settlement pattern within the U.S., 2SLS estimates," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 40(4), pages 792-802, October.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 9 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (2) 2011-11-07 2012-05-15
  2. NEP-ENE: Energy Economics (2) 2017-08-06 2017-12-11
  3. NEP-ENV: Environmental Economics (2) 2017-08-06 2017-12-11
  4. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (2) 2011-11-07 2017-12-11
  5. NEP-CIS: Confederation of Independent States (1) 2017-02-26
  6. NEP-CWA: Central & Western Asia (1) 2017-02-26
  7. NEP-EVO: Evolutionary Economics (1) 2017-02-26
  8. NEP-GEN: Gender (1) 2017-12-11
  9. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (1) 2012-05-15
  10. NEP-HPE: History & Philosophy of Economics (1) 2017-02-26
  11. NEP-POL: Positive Political Economics (1) 2017-12-11
  12. NEP-REG: Regulation (1) 2017-12-11
  13. NEP-TRA: Transition Economics (1) 2017-02-26

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