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Gender and climate change: Do female parliamentarians make difference?

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  • Mavisakalyan, Astghik
  • Tarverdi, Yashar

Abstract

This paper investigates whether female political representation in national parliaments influences climate change policy outcomes. Based on data from a large sample of countries, we demonstrate that female representation leads countries to adopt more stringent climate change policies. We exploit a combination of full and partial identification approaches to suggest that this relationship is likely to be causal. Moreover, we show that through its effect on the stringency of climate change policies, the representation of females in parliament results in lower carbon dioxide emissions. Female political representation may be an underutilized tool for addressing climate change.

Suggested Citation

  • Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Tarverdi, Yashar, 2018. "Gender and climate change: Do female parliamentarians make difference?," GLO Discussion Paper Series 221, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:glodps:221
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    gender; political representation; climate change; environmental policy;

    JEL classification:

    • D70 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - General
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming
    • Q58 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Government Policy

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