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Legal Origins and Climate Change Policies in Former Colonies

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  • Per Fredriksson

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  • Jim Wollscheid

    ()

Abstract

In this paper, we investigate how former colonies’ legal origins affect environmental policy outcomes. In particular, does it matter for climate change policies whether a country has French civil law or British common law legal heritage? In a cross section of up to 109 countries, we find that civil law countries tend to have stricter climate change policies than common law countries. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015

Suggested Citation

  • Per Fredriksson & Jim Wollscheid, 2015. "Legal Origins and Climate Change Policies in Former Colonies," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 62(2), pages 309-327, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:enreec:v:62:y:2015:i:2:p:309-327
    DOI: 10.1007/s10640-015-9957-2
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. La Porta, Rafael & Lopez-de-Silanes, Florencio & Shleifer, Andrei & Vishny, Robert, 1999. "The Quality of Government," Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 15(1), pages 222-279, April.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. David I. Stern & Jeremy Dijk, 2017. "Economic growth and global particulate pollution concentrations," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 142(3), pages 391-406, June.
    2. repec:kap:jbioec:v:19:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s10818-017-9243-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Yashar Tarverdi, 2017. "Gender and climate change: Do female parliamentarians make a difference?," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1704, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
    4. repec:bla:ecinqu:v:55:y:2017:i:3:p:1511-1537 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. David I. Stern, 2017. "The environmental Kuznets curve after 25 years," Journal of Bioeconomics, Springer, vol. 19(1), pages 7-28, April.
    6. Thomas Sterner, 2015. "Beyond IPCC, Research for Paris 2015 and Beyond," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 62(2), pages 207-215, October.
    7. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Yashar Tarverdi & Clas Weber, 2017. "Talking in the Present, caring for the Future: Language and Environment," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1703, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
    8. James B. Ang & Per G. Fredriksson, 2017. "Statehood Experience, Legal Traditions, And Climate Change Policies," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 55(3), pages 1511-1537, July.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Legal history; Climate change; Environmental policy; Institutions; Colonialism; Political economy; Q58; D72; D78; H23; K23;

    JEL classification:

    • Q58 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Government Policy
    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior
    • D78 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Positive Analysis of Policy Formulation and Implementation
    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies
    • K23 - Law and Economics - - Regulation and Business Law - - - Regulated Industries and Administrative Law

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