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Immigration, Public Education Spending, and Private Schooling

Author

Listed:
  • Astghik Mavisakalyan

    () (Research School of Economics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia)

Abstract

This article examines the impact of immigration on private school enrollment through the mechanism of public education spending. It finds that the immigrant share of population raises private school enrollment across countries by leading to a decrease in the share of public education spending. The decrease is driven by responses to immigrants from culturally similar and developed countries. This suggests that the role of public schools in promoting social cohesion among diverse populations is weighted against other concerns in education funding decisions in places with immigrant populations. The endogeneity of immigrant share is accounted for by using an instrument constructed from gravity model estimates.

Suggested Citation

  • Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2011. "Immigration, Public Education Spending, and Private Schooling," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 78(2), pages 397-423, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:sej:ancoec:v:78:2:y:2011:p:397-423
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.4284/0038-4038-78.2.397
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Murray, Thomas J., 2016. "Public or private? The influence of immigration on native schooling choices in the United States," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 268-283.
    2. Chletsos, Michael & Roupakias, Stelios, 2019. "Immigration and the economic performance of countries," MPRA Paper 94994, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Tarverdi, Yashar, 2019. "Gender and climate change: Do female parliamentarians make difference?," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 151-164.
    4. repec:kap:atlecj:v:45:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s11293-017-9542-x is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:adr:anecst:y:2018:i:131:p:83-116 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Richard Cebula & Christopher Duquette & Franklin Mixon, 2013. "Factors Influencing the State-Level Settlement Pattern of the Undocumented Immigrant Population in the United States," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 41(3), pages 203-213, September.
    7. Tesfaye A. Gebremedhin & Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2013. "Immigration and Political Instability," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 66(3), pages 317-341, August.
    8. Ivo Bischoff & Ferry Prasetyia, 2015. "Determinants of local public expenditures on education: empirical evidence for Indonesian districts between 2005 and 2012," MAGKS Papers on Economics 201532, Philipps-Universit├Ąt Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).
    9. Luca Marchiori & Patrice Pieretti & Benteng Zou, 2018. "Immigration, Occupational Choice and Public Employment," Annals of Economics and Statistics, GENES, issue 131, pages 83-116.
    10. Richard J. Cebula, 2016. "Give me sanctuary! The impact of personal freedom afforded by sanctuary cities on the 2010 undocumented immigrant settlement pattern within the U.S., 2SLS estimates," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 40(4), pages 792-802, October.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • H52 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Education
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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