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Creina Day

Personal Details

First Name:Creina
Middle Name:
Last Name:Day
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pda425
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
Terminal Degree:2009 College of Business and Economics; Australian National University (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

(50%) Arndt-Corden Department of Economics
Crawford School of Public Policy
Australian National University

Canberra, Australia
http://crawford.anu.edu.au/acde/

: +61 2 6125 2188
+61 2 6125 3700
The Administrator, Canberra ACT 2601
RePEc:edi:dpanuau (more details at EDIRC)

(40%) Crawford School of Public Policy
Australian National University

Canberra, Australia
http://www.crawford.anu.edu.au/

: +61 2 6125 4705
+61 2 6125 5448
Crawford Building, Lennox Crossing, Building #132, Canberra ACT 2601
RePEc:edi:asanuau (more details at EDIRC)

(10%) Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis (CAMA)
Crawford School of Public Policy
Australian National University

Canberra, Australia
http://cama.anu.edu.au/

: +61 2 6125 4442
+61 2 6125 5124
H. W. Arndt Building #25A, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 2601
RePEc:edi:cmanuau (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Creina Day, 2018. "Population and house prices in the United Kingdom," CAMA Working Papers 2018-21, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  2. Creina Day, 2018. "Australia's growth in households and house prices," Crawford School Research Papers 1803, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  3. Creina Day, 2018. "Inverse J effect of economic growth on fertility: a model of gender wages and maternal time substitution," CAMA Working Papers 2018-28, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  4. Creina Day, 2016. "Non-scale endogenous growth with R&D and human capital," CAMA Working Papers 2016-62, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  5. Creina Day, 2015. "Fertility and housing," CAMA Working Papers 2015-34, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  6. Creina Day & Ross S. Guest, 2014. "The Effect of Gender Wages and Working Age Populations on Fertility and House Prices," Crawford School Research Papers 1401, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  7. Creina Day, 2013. "Skill Composition, Fertility and Economic Growth," CAMA Working Papers 2013-47, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  8. Creina Day, 2012. "Will Fertility Rebound In Japan," Asia Pacific Economic Papers 395, Australia-Japan Research Centre, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  9. Creina Day & Steve Dowrick, 2010. "What entices the Stork? Fertility, Education and Family Payments," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2010-516, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.
  10. Creina Day & Garth Day, 2007. "Fiscal Reform, Growth and Current Account Dynamics," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2007-485, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.
  11. Creina Day, 2006. "Population and Endogenous Growth," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2006-475, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.

Articles

  1. Day, Creina & Day, Garth, 2017. "Climate change, fossil fuel prices and depletion: The rationale for a falling export tax," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 153-160.
  2. Creina Day, 2016. "Can Theory Explain the Evidence on Fertility Decline Reversal?," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 49(2), pages 136-145, February.
  3. Creina Day, 2016. "Fertility and economic growth: the role of workforce skill composition and child care prices," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 68(2), pages 546-565.
  4. Day, Creina & Guest, Ross, 2016. "Fertility and female wages: A new link via house prices," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 121-132.
  5. Creina Day, 2016. "Non-Scale Endogenous Growth with R&D and Human Capital," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 63(5), pages 443-467, November.
  6. Creina Day, 2015. "Skill Composition, Fertility, and Economic Growth," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 61(1), pages 164-178, March.
  7. Yose R. Damuri & Creina Day, 2015. "Survey of Recent Developments," Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 51(1), pages 3-27, April.
  8. Allen, Creina & Day, Garth, 2014. "Depletion of non-renewable resources imported by China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 235-243.
  9. Creina Allen & Garth Day, 2014. "Does China's demand boom curb Australian iron ore mining depletion?," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 58(2), pages 244-262, April.
  10. Creina Day, 2014. "Aging and Economic Growth in the Pacific Region edited by Akira Kohsaka (ed.) Routledge Studies in the Modern World Economy , London and New York , 2013 Pp. 176. ISBN 978 0415 52422 3," Asian-Pacific Economic Literature, Asia Pacific School of Economics and Government, The Australian National University, vol. 28(2), pages 98-100, November.
  11. Creina Day & Steve Dowrick, 2013. "Endogenous growth with R&D and human capital: the role of returns to scale," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 65(2), pages 312-322, April.
  12. Creina Day, 2012. "Economic Growth, Gender Wage Gap and Fertility Rebound," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 88(s1), pages 88-99, June.
  13. Creina Day, 2011. "China's Fiscal Stimulus and the Recession Australia Never Had: Is a Growth Slowdown Now Inevitable?," Agenda - A Journal of Policy Analysis and Reform, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics, vol. 18(1), pages 23-34.
  14. Creina Day & Garth Day, 2010. "Taxes, Growth And The Current Account Tick-Curve Effect," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(1), pages 13-27, March.
  15. Creina Day & Steve Dowrick, 2010. "What Entices the Stork? Fertility, Education and Family Payments," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 86(s1), pages 69-79, September.
  16. Day Creina, 2004. "The Dynamics of Fertility and Growth: Baby Boom, Bust and Bounce-Back," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 4(1), pages 1-34, November.
  17. Creina Day & Steve Dowrick, 2004. "Ageing Economics: Human Capital, Productivity and Fertility," Agenda - A Journal of Policy Analysis and Reform, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics, vol. 11(1), pages 3-20.
  18. Peter Tisato & Creina Allen, 1993. "Taxes And Marketable Permits In Pollution Control," Economic Papers, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 12(1), pages 83-86, March.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Creina Day, 2016. "Non-scale endogenous growth with R&D and human capital," CAMA Working Papers 2016-62, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.

    Cited by:

    1. Zouaghi, Ferdaous & Sánchez, Mercedes & Martínez, Marian García, 2018. "Did the global financial crisis impact firms' innovation performance? The role of internal and external knowledge capabilities in high and low tech industries," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 132(C), pages 92-104.
    2. Lai, Chung-Hui & Hu, Shih-Wen & Wang, Vey & Chao, Chi-Chur, 2017. "Agricultural R&D, policies, (in)determinacy, and growth," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 328-341.

  2. Creina Day, 2013. "Skill Composition, Fertility and Economic Growth," CAMA Working Papers 2013-47, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.

    Cited by:

    1. Creina Day, 2016. "Can Theory Explain the Evidence on Fertility Decline Reversal?," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 49(2), pages 136-145, February.

  3. Creina Day & Steve Dowrick, 2010. "What entices the Stork? Fertility, Education and Family Payments," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2010-516, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Nick Parr, 2011. "The contribution of increases in family benefits to Australia’s early 21st-century fertility increase: An empirical analysis," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 25(6), pages 215-244, July.

Articles

  1. Day, Creina & Guest, Ross, 2016. "Fertility and female wages: A new link via house prices," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 121-132.

    Cited by:

    1. Marcén, Miriam & Molina, José Alberto & Morales, Marina, 2018. "The effect of culture on the fertility decisions of immigrant women in the United States," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 15-28.
    2. Hirazawa, Makoto & Yakita, Akira, 2017. "Labor supply of elderly people, fertility, and economic development," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 75-96.
    3. Olena Y. Nizalova, 2017. "Motherhood wage penalty may affect pronatalist policies," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 359-359, May.

  2. Creina Day, 2016. "Non-Scale Endogenous Growth with R&D and Human Capital," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 63(5), pages 443-467, November.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Creina Day, 2015. "Skill Composition, Fertility, and Economic Growth," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 61(1), pages 164-178, March.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  4. Yose R. Damuri & Creina Day, 2015. "Survey of Recent Developments," Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 51(1), pages 3-27, April.

    Cited by:

    1. Greg Fealy & Hugh White, 2016. "Indonesia's ‘Great Power’ Aspirations: A Critical View," Asia and the Pacific Policy Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 3(1), pages 89-97, January.
    2. Mahadevan, Renuka & Nugroho, Anda & Amir, Hidayat, 2017. "Do inward looking trade policies affect poverty and income inequality? Evidence from Indonesia's recent wave of rising protectionism," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 23-34.
    3. Arief Anshory Yusuf & Andy Sumner, 2017. "Multidimensional poverty in Indonesia: How inclusive has economic growth been?," Departmental Working Papers 2017-09, The Australian National University, Arndt-Corden Department of Economics.
    4. Scobie, Michelle, 2017. "Fossil fuel reform in developing states: The case of Trinidad and Tobago, a petroleum producing small Island developing State," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 104(C), pages 265-273.

  5. Creina Day, 2012. "Economic Growth, Gender Wage Gap and Fertility Rebound," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 88(s1), pages 88-99, June.

    Cited by:

    1. Hanna Jung & Joonmo Cho, 2016. "Quality of Jobs for Female Workers: A Comparative Study of South Korea and Australia," Applied Research in Quality of Life, Springer;International Society for Quality-of-Life Studies, vol. 11(1), pages 1-22, March.
    2. Masaya Yasuoka & Naohisa Goto, 2015. "How is the child allowance to be financed? By income tax or consumption tax?," International Review of Economics, Springer;Happiness Economics and Interpersonal Relations (HEIRS), vol. 62(3), pages 249-269, September.
    3. Kazumasa Oguro & Masaya Yasuoka, 2017. "Stress, Child Care, and Fertility," Discussion Paper Series 153, School of Economics, Kwansei Gakuin University, revised Jan 2017.
    4. Laura Cabeza-García & Esther B. Del Brio & Mery Luz Oscanoa-Victorio, 2018. "Gender Factors and Inclusive Economic Growth: The Silent Revolution," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(1), pages 1-14, January.
    5. Piotr Dominiak, & Ewa Lechman & Piotr Anna Okonowicz, 2014. "Fertility rebound and economic growth. New evidence for 18 countries over the period 1970-2011," Working Papers 28/2014, Institute of Economic Research, revised Dec 2014.
    6. Masatoshi Jinno & Masaya Yasuoka, 2016. "Are the social security benefits of pensions or child-care policies best financed by a consumption tax?," Business and Economic Horizons (BEH), Prague Development Center, vol. 12(3), pages 94-112, September.

  6. Creina Day, 2011. "China's Fiscal Stimulus and the Recession Australia Never Had: Is a Growth Slowdown Now Inevitable?," Agenda - A Journal of Policy Analysis and Reform, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics, vol. 18(1), pages 23-34.

    Cited by:

    1. Groenewold, Nicolaas, 2018. "Australia saved from the financial crisis by policy or by exports?," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 118-135.

  7. Creina Day & Garth Day, 2010. "Taxes, Growth And The Current Account Tick-Curve Effect," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(1), pages 13-27, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Sachverständigenrat zur Begutachtung der Gesamtwirtschaftlichen Entwicklung (ed.), 2015. "Zukunftsfähigkeit in den Mittelpunkt. Jahresgutachten 2015/16," Annual Economic Reports / Jahresgutachten, German Council of Economic Experts / Sachverständigenrat zur Begutachtung der gesamtwirtschaftlichen Entwicklung, volume 127, number 201516, April.

  8. Creina Day & Steve Dowrick, 2010. "What Entices the Stork? Fertility, Education and Family Payments," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 86(s1), pages 69-79, September.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  9. Day Creina, 2004. "The Dynamics of Fertility and Growth: Baby Boom, Bust and Bounce-Back," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 4(1), pages 1-34, November.

    Cited by:

    1. Olivier Thévenon & Angela Luci Greulich, 2014. "Does Economic Advancement ‘Cause’ a Re-increase in Fertility? An Empirical Analysis for OECD Countries (1960–2007)," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-00966571, HAL.
    2. Angela Luci & Olivier Thevenon, 2011. "The impact of family policy packages on fertility trends in developed countries," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-00660630, HAL.
    3. Day, Creina & Guest, Ross, 2016. "Fertility and female wages: A new link via house prices," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 121-132.
    4. Maricruz Lacalle-Calderon & Manuel Perez-Trujillo & Isabel Neira, 2017. "Fertility and Economic Development: Quantile Regression Evidence on the Inverse J-shaped Pattern," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 33(1), pages 1-31, February.
    5. Creina Day, 2016. "Can Theory Explain the Evidence on Fertility Decline Reversal?," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 49(2), pages 136-145, February.
    6. Creina Day & Ross S. Guest, 2014. "The Effect of Gender Wages and Working Age Populations on Fertility and House Prices," Crawford School Research Papers 1401, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    7. Creina Day, 2012. "Economic Growth, Gender Wage Gap and Fertility Rebound," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 88(s1), pages 88-99, June.

  10. Creina Day & Steve Dowrick, 2004. "Ageing Economics: Human Capital, Productivity and Fertility," Agenda - A Journal of Policy Analysis and Reform, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics, vol. 11(1), pages 3-20.

    Cited by:

    1. Peng Yu, 2006. "Higher Education, the Bane of Fertility? An investigation with the HILDA Survey," CEPR Discussion Papers 512, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    2. Creina Day, 2014. "Aging and Economic Growth in the Pacific Region edited by Akira Kohsaka (ed.) Routledge Studies in the Modern World Economy , London and New York , 2013 Pp. 176. ISBN 978 0415 52422 3," Asian-Pacific Economic Literature, Asia Pacific School of Economics and Government, The Australian National University, vol. 28(2), pages 98-100, November.
    3. Janna Thompson, 2005. "Intergenerational Equity in an Ageing Society," Agenda - A Journal of Policy Analysis and Reform, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics, vol. 12(1), pages 83-96.

  11. Peter Tisato & Creina Allen, 1993. "Taxes And Marketable Permits In Pollution Control," Economic Papers, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 12(1), pages 83-86, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Hoel, Michael & Karp, Larry, 2001. "Taxes versus Quotas for a Stock Pollutant," Department of Agricultural & Resource Economics, UC Berkeley, Working Paper Series qt5fx9p7kf, Department of Agricultural & Resource Economics, UC Berkeley.
    2. Tietenberg, Tom, 1998. "Ethical influences on the evolution of the US tradable permit approach to air pollution control," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(2-3), pages 241-257, February.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 10 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (4) 2014-06-22 2015-08-30 2018-05-14 2018-05-14
  2. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (3) 2012-08-23 2013-08-23 2014-06-22
  3. NEP-DEV: Development (2) 2007-08-27 2013-08-23
  4. NEP-DGE: Dynamic General Equilibrium (2) 2007-08-27 2018-05-14
  5. NEP-AGE: Economics of Ageing (1) 2018-05-14
  6. NEP-CBA: Central Banking (1) 2007-11-24
  7. NEP-CSE: Economics of Strategic Management (1) 2016-10-16
  8. NEP-GER: German Papers (1) 2015-08-30
  9. NEP-GRO: Economic Growth (1) 2016-10-16
  10. NEP-INO: Innovation (1) 2016-10-16
  11. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (1) 2010-04-17
  12. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (1) 2007-11-24

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