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Jeffrey C. Brinkman

Personal Details

First Name:Jeffrey
Middle Name:C.
Last Name:Brinkman
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pbr543
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
Terminal Degree:2011 Department of Economics; Tepper School of Business Administration; Carnegie Mellon University (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

(50%) Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)
http://www.philadelphiafed.org/

:

10 Independence Mall, Philadelphia, PA 19106-1574
RePEc:edi:frbphus (more details at EDIRC)

(50%) Research Department
Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)
http://www.philadelphiafed.org/research-and-data/

:

10 Independence Mall, Philadelphia, PA 19106-1574
RePEc:edi:rfrbpus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Jeffrey Brinkman & David Mok-Lamme, 2017. "Not in My Backyard? Not So Fast. The Effect of Marijuana Legalization on Neighborhood Crime," Working Papers 17-19, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, revised 18 Jul 2017.
  2. Daniele Coen-Pirani & Holger Sieg & Jeffrey Brinkman, 2016. "The Political Economy of Underfunded Municipal Pension," Working Papers 16-16, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, revised 27 May 2016.
  3. Holger Sieg & Daniele Coen-Pirani & Jeffrey Brinkman, 2015. "The Political Economy of Underfunded Municipal Pension Plans," 2015 Meeting Papers 345, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  4. Jeffrey Brinkman, 2014. "The supply and demand of skilled workers in cities and the role of industry composition," Working Papers 14-32, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, revised 20 Oct 2014.
  5. Jeffrey Brinkman, 2013. "Congestion, agglomeration, and the structure of cities," Working Papers 13-25, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, revised 2013.
  6. Holger Sieg & Daniele Coen-Pirani & Jeffrey Brinkman, 2012. "Estimating a dynamic equilibrium model of firm location choices in an urban economy," Working Papers 12-26, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, revised 2012.

Articles

  1. Jeffrey Brinkman, 2017. "Making Sense of Urban Patterns," Economic Insights, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, pages 1-5, Q1.
  2. Brinkman, Jeffrey C., 2016. "Congestion, agglomeration, and the structure of cities," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 13-31.
  3. Jeffrey Brinkman & Daniele Coen‐Pirani & Holger Sieg, 2015. "Firm Dynamics In An Urban Economy," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 56, pages 1135-1164, November.
  4. Jeffrey Brinkman, 2015. "Big cities and the highly educated: what's the connection," Business Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, pages 10-15.
  5. Jeffrey Brinkman, 2014. "Location dynamics: a key consideration for urban policy," Business Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, pages 9-15.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Jeffrey Brinkman & David Mok-Lamme, 2017. "Not in My Backyard? Not So Fast. The Effect of Marijuana Legalization on Neighborhood Crime," Working Papers 17-19, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, revised 18 Jul 2017.

    Cited by:

    1. Jesse Burkhardt & Chris Goemans, 2019. "The short-run effects of marijuana dispensary openings on local crime," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 63(1), pages 163-189, August.
    2. Vincenzo Carraieri & Leonardo Madio & Francesco Principe, "undated". "Light cannabis and organized crime: Evidence from (unintended) liberalization in Italy," CORE Discussion Papers RP 2988, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
    3. Carrieri,V.; & Madio,L.; & Principe, F.;, 2019. "Do-It-Yourself medicine? The impact of light cannabis liberalization on prescription drugs," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 19/07, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.

  2. Daniele Coen-Pirani & Holger Sieg & Jeffrey Brinkman, 2016. "The Political Economy of Underfunded Municipal Pension," Working Papers 16-16, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, revised 27 May 2016.

    Cited by:

    1. Levon Barseghyan & Stephen Coate, 2017. "On the Dynamics of Community Development," NBER Working Papers 23674, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  3. Holger Sieg & Daniele Coen-Pirani & Jeffrey Brinkman, 2015. "The Political Economy of Underfunded Municipal Pension Plans," 2015 Meeting Papers 345, Society for Economic Dynamics.

    Cited by:

    1. Levon Barseghyan & Stephen Coate, 2017. "On the Dynamics of Community Development," NBER Working Papers 23674, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  4. Jeffrey Brinkman, 2014. "The supply and demand of skilled workers in cities and the role of industry composition," Working Papers 14-32, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, revised 20 Oct 2014.

    Cited by:

    1. Haixiao Wu, 2018. "Is There a Kuznets Curve for Intra-City Earnings Inequality?," Working Papers 2018-09, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
    2. Broxterman, Daniel A. & Yezer, Anthony M., 2015. "Why does skill intensity vary across cities? The role of housing cost," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 14-27.
    3. Jeffrey Brinkman, 2015. "Big cities and the highly educated: what's the connection," Business Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, pages 10-15.

  5. Jeffrey Brinkman, 2013. "Congestion, agglomeration, and the structure of cities," Working Papers 13-25, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, revised 2013.

    Cited by:

    1. Satyajit Chatterjee & Burcu Eyigungor, 2015. "A tractable city model for aggregative analysis," Working Papers 15-37, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, revised 17 Oct 2015.
    2. Redding, Stephen J. & Rossi-Hansberg, Esteban, 2016. "Quantitative spatial economics," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 69020, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    3. Ahlfeldt, Gabriel M. & Redding, Stephen J. & Sturm, Daniel & Wolf, Nikolaus, 2012. "The economics of density: evidence from the Berlin wall," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 58600, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    4. Duranton, Gilles & Puga, Diego, 2015. "Urban Land Use," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, in: Gilles Duranton & J. V. Henderson & William C. Strange (ed.), Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, edition 1, volume 5, chapter 0, pages 467-560, Elsevier.
    5. Jordan Rappaport, 2014. "A quantitative system of monocentric metros," Research Working Paper RWP 14-3, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, revised 01 May 2014.
    6. Hoyt Bleakley & Jeffrey Lin, 2015. "History and the Sizes of Cities," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 105(5), pages 558-563, May.
    7. Wei-Bin Zhang, 2017. "Multi-Regional Growth, Agglomeration and Land Values in a Generalized Heckscher-Ohlin Trade Model," Eastern European Business and Economics Journal, Eastern European Business and Economics Studies Centre, vol. 3(3), pages 270-305.
    8. Jeffrey Brinkman, 2014. "Location dynamics: a key consideration for urban policy," Business Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, pages 9-15.
    9. Vandyck, Toon & Rutherford, Thomas F., 2018. "Regional labor markets, commuting, and the economic impact of road pricing," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 217-236.
    10. José M. Gaspar, 2018. "A prospective review on New Economic Geography," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 61(2), pages 237-272, September.
    11. Stef Proost & Jacques-Francois Thisse, 2017. "What Can Be Learned from Spatial Economics?," HSE Working papers WP BRP 167/EC/2017, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    12. Jordan Rappaport, 2014. "Monocentric city redux," Research Working Paper RWP 14-9, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, revised 01 Nov 2014.
    13. Koen van Ruijven & Paul Verstraten & Peter Zwaneveld, 2019. "Transit-oriented developments and residential property values," CPB Discussion Paper 399, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    14. Ben Dachis, 2013. "Cars, Congestion and Costs: A New Approach to Evaluating Government Infrastructure Investment," C.D. Howe Institute Commentary, C.D. Howe Institute, issue 385, July.
    15. Pan, Haozhi & Deal, Brian & Chen, Yan & Hewings, Geoffrey, 2018. "A Reassessment of urban structure and land-use patterns: distance to CBD or network-based? — Evidence from Chicago," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 215-228.

  6. Holger Sieg & Daniele Coen-Pirani & Jeffrey Brinkman, 2012. "Estimating a dynamic equilibrium model of firm location choices in an urban economy," Working Papers 12-26, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, revised 2012.

    Cited by:

    1. Duranton, Gilles & Puga, Diego, 2015. "Urban Land Use," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, in: Gilles Duranton & J. V. Henderson & William C. Strange (ed.), Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, edition 1, volume 5, chapter 0, pages 467-560, Elsevier.

Articles

  1. Jeffrey Brinkman, 2017. "Making Sense of Urban Patterns," Economic Insights, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, pages 1-5, Q1.

    Cited by:

    1. Jeffrey Lin, 2017. "Understanding Gentrification’s Causes," Economic Insights, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, pages 9-17, Q3.

  2. Brinkman, Jeffrey C., 2016. "Congestion, agglomeration, and the structure of cities," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 13-31.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Jeffrey Brinkman & Daniele Coen‐Pirani & Holger Sieg, 2015. "Firm Dynamics In An Urban Economy," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 56, pages 1135-1164, November.

    Cited by:

    1. Cecile Gaubert, 2018. "Firm Sorting and Agglomeration," NBER Working Papers 24478, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Behrens, Kristian & Mion, Giordano & Murata, Yasusada & Südekum, Jens, 2011. "Spatial frictions," CEPR Discussion Papers 8572, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Jeffrey Brinkman, 2016. "Congestion, Agglomeration, and the Structure of Cities," Working Papers 16-13, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, revised 10 May 2016.
    4. Sergey Kichko, 2019. "Competition, Land Prices, and City Size," CESifo Working Paper Series 7727, CESifo Group Munich.
    5. Gaubert, Cécile, 2018. "Firm Sorting and Agglomeration," CEPR Discussion Papers 12835, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    6. Jordan Rappaport, 2014. "Monocentric city redux," Research Working Paper RWP 14-9, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, revised 01 Nov 2014.
    7. Sergey Kichko, 2018. "Competition, Land Price, and City Size," HSE Working papers WP BRP 190/EC/2018, National Research University Higher School of Economics.

  4. Jeffrey Brinkman, 2014. "Location dynamics: a key consideration for urban policy," Business Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, pages 9-15.

    Cited by:

    1. Paul R. Flora, 2015. "Regional spotlight: regions defined and dissected," Business Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, pages 5-11.
    2. Paul R. Flora, 2015. "Regions defined and dissected," Regional Spotlight, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, pages 1-7.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 8 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (8) 2012-11-11 2013-06-09 2014-11-17 2015-08-13 2016-06-18 2016-06-18 2016-07-09 2017-07-30. Author is listed
  2. NEP-AGE: Economics of Ageing (3) 2015-08-13 2016-06-18 2016-07-09. Author is listed
  3. NEP-DGE: Dynamic General Equilibrium (3) 2012-11-11 2015-08-13 2016-07-09. Author is listed
  4. NEP-GEO: Economic Geography (3) 2012-11-11 2013-06-09 2016-06-18. Author is listed
  5. NEP-POL: Positive Political Economics (3) 2015-08-13 2016-06-18 2016-07-09. Author is listed
  6. NEP-CMP: Computational Economics (2) 2013-06-09 2016-06-18. Author is listed
  7. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (2) 2016-06-18 2016-07-09. Author is listed
  8. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (1) 2014-11-17
  9. NEP-LAW: Law & Economics (1) 2017-07-30
  10. NEP-LMA: Labor Markets - Supply, Demand, & Wages (1) 2014-11-17
  11. NEP-TRE: Transport Economics (1) 2013-06-09

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