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Location dynamics: a key consideration for urban policy

Author

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  • Jeffrey Brinkman

Abstract

What determines where businesses and households locate? Location decisions can affect the economic health of cities and metropolitan areas. But as Jeffrey Brinkman explains, how firms, residents, and workers go about choosing where to locate can involve complex interactions with sometimes unpredictable consequences.

Suggested Citation

  • Jeffrey Brinkman, 2014. "Location dynamics: a key consideration for urban policy," Business Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, issue 1, pages 9-15.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedpbr:00005
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    File URL: https://www.philadelphiafed.org/-/media/frbp/assets/economy/articles/business-review/2014/q1/brQ114_location_dynamics.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jonathan Leape, 2006. "The London Congestion Charge," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 20(4), pages 157-176, Fall.
    2. Brinkman, Jeffrey C., 2016. "Congestion, agglomeration, and the structure of cities," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 13-31.
    3. Mohammad Arzaghi & J. Vernon Henderson, 2008. "Networking off Madison Avenue," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 75(4), pages 1011-1038.
    4. Jeffrey Lin, 2011. "Urban productivity advantages from job search and matching," Business Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, issue Q1, pages 9-16.
    5. Charles M. Tiebout, 1956. "A Pure Theory of Local Expenditures," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 64, pages 416-416.
    6. Fujita, Masahisa & Ogawa, Hideaki, 1982. "Multiple equilibria and structural transition of non-monocentric urban configurations," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(2), pages 161-196, May.
    7. Jeffrey Lin, 2012. "Geography, history, economies of density, and the location of cities," Business Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, issue Q3, pages 18-24.
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    Cited by:

    1. Paul R. Flora, 2015. "Regional spotlight: regions defined and dissected," Business Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, issue Q4, pages 5-11.
    2. Paul R. Flora, 2015. "Regions defined and dissected," Regional Spotlight, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, issue Q4, pages 1-7.

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    Keywords

    Business; Location; Urban policy; Metropolitan areas;

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