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Big cities and the highly educated: what's the connection

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  • Jeffrey Brinkman

Abstract

Why are more college-educated workers gravitating to large metropolitan areas? As Jeffrey Brinkman explains, amenities are increasingly important in people?s location decisions, a trend that may help inform urban policymaking.

Suggested Citation

  • Jeffrey Brinkman, 2015. "Big cities and the highly educated: what's the connection," Business Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, issue Q3, pages 10-15.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedpbr:00024
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Gerald A. Carlino, 2011. "Three keys to the city: resources, agglomeration economies, and sorting," Business Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, issue Q3, pages 1-13.
    2. Jeffrey Lin, 2011. "Technological Adaptation, Cities, and New Work," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 93(2), pages 554-574, May.
    3. Lee, Sanghoon, 2010. "Ability sorting and consumer city," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 20-33, July.
    4. Ronald L. Moomaw, 1981. "Productivity and City Size: A Critique of the Evidence," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 96(4), pages 675-688.
    5. Jeffrey Brinkman, 2014. "The supply and demand of skilled workers in cities and the role of industry composition," Working Papers 14-32, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    6. Jessie Handbury, 2019. "Are Poor Cities Cheap for Everyone? Non-Homotheticity and the Cost of Living Across U.S. Cities," NBER Working Papers 26574, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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