IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/e/pza155.html
   My authors  Follow this author

Mike Zabek

Personal Details

First Name:Mike
Middle Name:
Last Name:Zabek
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pza155
http://www.mikezabek.com

Affiliation

Federal Reserve Board (Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System)

Washington, District of Columbia (United States)
http://www.federalreserve.gov/



20th Street and Constitution Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20551
RePEc:edi:frbgvus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Michael A. Zabek, 2019. "Local Ties in Spatial Equilibrium," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2019-080, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  2. Patrick Coate & Pawel Krolikowski & Michael A. Zabek, 2017. "Parental Proximity and Earnings after Job Displacements," Working Papers (Old Series) 1722, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, revised 29 Nov 2017.
  3. David Albouy & Mike Zabek, 2016. "Housing Inequality," NBER Working Papers 21916, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Kevin Foster & Erik Meijer & Scott Schuh & Michael A. Zabek, 2011. "The 2009 survey of consumer payment choice," Public Policy Discussion Paper 11-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  5. Kevin Foster & Erik Meijer & Scott Schuh & Michael A. Zabek, 2010. "The 2008 Survey of Consumer Payment Choice," Public Policy Discussion Paper 09-10, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

Articles

  1. Krolikowski, Pawel & Zabek, Mike & Coate, Patrick, 2020. "Parental proximity and earnings after job displacements," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(C).
  2. Patrick Coate & Pawel Krolikowski & Michael A. Zabek, 2018. "Parental Assistance after Job Loss," Economic Commentary, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, issue August.
  3. Patrick Coate & Pawel Krolikowski & Michael A. Zabek, 2017. "Parental Proximity and the Earnings Consequences of Job Loss," Economic Commentary, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, issue February.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Michael A. Zabek, 2019. "Local Ties in Spatial Equilibrium," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2019-080, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).

    Cited by:

    1. Timothy J. Bartik, 2020. "Using Place-Based Jobs Policies to Help Distressed Communities," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 34(3), pages 99-127, Summer.
    2. Ariel J. Binder & John Bound, 2019. "The Declining Labor Market Prospects of Less-Educated Men," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 33(2), pages 163-190, Spring.
    3. Benjamin A. Austin & Edward L. Glaeser & Lawrence H. Summers, 2018. "Jobs for the Heartland: Place-Based Policies in 21st Century America," NBER Working Papers 24548, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  2. Patrick Coate & Pawel Krolikowski & Michael A. Zabek, 2017. "Parental Proximity and Earnings after Job Displacements," Working Papers (Old Series) 1722, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, revised 29 Nov 2017.

    Cited by:

    1. Patrick Coate & Pawel Krolikowski & Michael A. Zabek, 2018. "Parental Assistance after Job Loss," Economic Commentary, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, issue August.
    2. Michael A. Zabek, 2019. "Local Ties in Spatial Equilibrium," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2019-080, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).

  3. David Albouy & Mike Zabek, 2016. "Housing Inequality," NBER Working Papers 21916, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Clément Bellet, 2017. "Essays on Inequality, Social Preferences and Consumer Behavior," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/vbu6kd1s68o, Sciences Po.
    2. Greg Howard & Carl Liebersohn, 2019. "What Explains U.S. House Prices? Regional Income Divergence," 2019 Meeting Papers 1054, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    3. Michael Amior, 2018. "The Contribution of Foreign Migration to Local Labor Market Adjustment," CEP Discussion Papers dp1582, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    4. Patrick Coate & Pawel Krolikowski & Michael A. Zabek, 2017. "Parental Proximity and Earnings after Job Displacements," Working Papers (Old Series) 1722, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, revised 29 Nov 2017.
    5. Divya Singh, 2020. "Do Property Tax Incentives for New Construction Spur Gentrification? Evidence from New York City," 2020 Papers psi856, Job Market Papers.
    6. Prottoy A. Akbar & Sijie Li & Allison Shertzer & Randall P. Walsh, 2019. "Racial Segregation in Housing Markets and the Erosion of Black Wealth," NBER Working Papers 25805, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Clement Bellet, 2017. "The Paradox of the Joneses: Superstar Houses and Mortgage Frenzy in Suburban America," CEP Discussion Papers dp1462, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    8. C. Y. Cyrus Chu & Jou-Chun Lin & Wen-Jen Tsay, 2020. "Males’ housing wealth and their marriage market advantage," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 33(3), pages 1005-1023, July.
    9. Gray, Rowena, 2020. "Inequality in nineteenth century Manhattan: Evidence from the housing market," QUCEH Working Paper Series 2020-02, Queen's University Belfast, Queen's University Centre for Economic History.
    10. Bellet, Clement, 2017. "The paradox of the Joneses: superstar houses andmortgage frenzy in suburban America," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 69044, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

  4. Kevin Foster & Erik Meijer & Scott Schuh & Michael A. Zabek, 2011. "The 2009 survey of consumer payment choice," Public Policy Discussion Paper 11-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

    Cited by:

    1. Claire Greene & Scott Schuh & Joanna Stavins, 2017. "The 2015 Survey of Consumer Payment Choice: summary results," Research Data Report 17-3, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    2. Bruno Karoubi & Régis Chenavaz & Corina Paraschiv, 2016. "Consumers’ perceived risk and hold and use of payment instruments," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(14), pages 1317-1329, March.
    3. Choi, Hyung Sun, 2014. "Money, credit, risk of loss, and limited participation," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 9-23.
    4. Konstantinos Nikolopoulos & Konstantia Litsiou, 2019. "Social Collateral and consumer payment media during the economic crisis in Europe," Working Papers 19009, Bangor Business School, Prifysgol Bangor University (Cymru / Wales).
    5. Marco Angrisani & Arie Kapteyn & Scott Schuh, 2012. "Measuring household spending and payment habits: the role of “typical” and “specific” time frames in survey questions," Working Papers 12-7, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, revised 2012.
    6. Scott Schuh & Joanna Stavins, 2014. "The 2011 and 2012 Surveys of Consumer Payment Choice," Research Data Report 14-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    7. Kevin Foster & Scott Schuh & Hanbing Zhang, 2013. "The 2010 Survey of Consumer Payment Choice," Research Data Report 13-2, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    8. Dubravka Ritter, 2012. "Do we still need the Equal Credit Opportunity Act?," Consumer Finance Institute discussion papers 12-03, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    9. Schuh, Scott & Briglevics, Tamás, 2014. "U.S. consumer demand for cash in the era of low interest rates and electronic payments," Working Paper Series 1660, European Central Bank.
    10. Peter Mooslechner & Helmut Stix & Karin Wagner, 2012. "The Use of Payment Instruments in Austria - A Study Based on Survey Data from 1996 to 2011," Monetary Policy & the Economy, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank), issue 4, pages 53-77.
    11. Joanna Stavins, 2016. "The effect of demographics on payment behavior: panel data with sample selection," Working Papers 16-5, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, revised 07 Jun 2016.
    12. Marcin Hitczenko, 2015. "Estimating population means in the 2012 Survey of Consumer Payment Choice," Research Data Report 15-2, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    13. Nur Annisa Hasniawati & Eva R. Lase & Akhis R. Hutabarat, 2020. "Indonesian Household Payment Choice: A Nested Logit Analysis," Journal of Central Banking Theory and Practice, Central bank of Montenegro, vol. 9(special i), pages 291-313.
    14. Marcin Hitczenko, 2013. "Optimal recall period length in consumer payment surveys," Working Papers 13-16, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, revised 01 Dec 2013.
    15. Marco Angrisani & Kevin Foster & Marcin Hitczenko, 2013. "The 2010 Survey of Consumer Payment Choice: technical appendix," Research Data Report 13-3, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    16. Oz Shy, 2012. "Who gains and who loses from the 2011 debit card interchange fee reform?," Public Policy Discussion Paper 12-6, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    17. Lotz, Sebastien & Zhang, Cathy, 2015. "Money and Credit as Means of Payment: A New Monetarist Approach," MPRA Paper 64535, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    18. Sean Connolly & Joanna Stavins, 2015. "Payment instrument adoption and use in the United States, 2009–2013, by consumers' demographic characteristics," Research Data Report 15-6, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    19. Konstantinos Nikolopoulos & Konstantia Litsiou, 2019. "Consumer payment choice during the crisis in Europe: a heterogeneous behaviour?," Working Papers 19007, Bangor Business School, Prifysgol Bangor University (Cymru / Wales).
    20. Imaduddin Sahabat & Teguh Dartanto & Haidy A. Passay & Diah Widyawati, 2017. "Electronics Payment Decisions of the Indonesian Urban Households: A Nested Logit Analysis of the Effects of the Payment Characteristics," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 7(5), pages 498-511.
    21. Marcin Hitczenko & Mingzhu Tai, 2014. "Measuring unfamiliar economic concepts: the case of prepaid card adoption," Working Papers 14-9, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, revised 18 Jun 2014.
    22. Claire Greene & Joanna Stavins, 2016. "Did the Target data breach change consumer assessments of payment card security?," Research Data Report 16-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    23. Oz Shy, 2014. "Measuring Some Effects Of The 2011 Debit Card Interchange Fee Reform," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 32(4), pages 769-783, October.

  5. Kevin Foster & Erik Meijer & Scott Schuh & Michael A. Zabek, 2010. "The 2008 Survey of Consumer Payment Choice," Public Policy Discussion Paper 09-10, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

    Cited by:

    1. Claire Greene & Scott Schuh & Joanna Stavins, 2017. "The 2015 Survey of Consumer Payment Choice: summary results," Research Data Report 17-3, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    2. Scott Schuh & Joanna Stavins, 2014. "The 2011 and 2012 Surveys of Consumer Payment Choice," Research Data Report 14-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    3. Kevin Foster & Scott Schuh & Hanbing Zhang, 2013. "The 2010 Survey of Consumer Payment Choice," Research Data Report 13-2, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    4. William Jack & Tavneet Suri & Robert M. Townsend, 2010. "Monetary theory and electronic money : reflections on the Kenyan experience," Economic Quarterly, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, vol. 96(1Q), pages 83-122.
    5. Lukasz Drozd & Michal Kowalik, 2019. "Credit Cards and the Great Recession: The Collapse of Teasers," 2019 Meeting Papers 1047, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    6. Ronald J. Mann, 2011. "Adopting, using, and discarding paper and electronic payment instruments: variation by age and race," Public Policy Discussion Paper 11-2, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    7. Joanna Stavins, 2016. "The effect of demographics on payment behavior: panel data with sample selection," Working Papers 16-5, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, revised 07 Jun 2016.
    8. Oz Shy, 2011. "Account-to-account electronic money transfers: recent developments in the United States," Public Policy Discussion Paper 11-10, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    9. Oz Shy & Zhu Wang, 2011. "Why Do Payment Card Networks Charge Proportional Fees?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(4), pages 1575-1590, June.
    10. Bruce J. Summers & Kirstin E. Wells, 2011. "Emergence of immediate funds transfer as a general-purpose means of payment," Economic Perspectives, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, vol. 35(Q III), pages 97-112.
    11. Sean Connolly & Joanna Stavins, 2015. "Payment instrument adoption and use in the United States, 2009–2013, by consumers' demographic characteristics," Research Data Report 15-6, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    12. Claire Greene & Joanna Stavins, 2018. "The 2016 and 2017 surveys of consumer payment choice: summary results," Research Data Report 18-3, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    13. Kevin Foster & Erik Meijer & Scott Schuh & Michael A. Zabek, 2011. "The 2009 survey of consumer payment choice," Public Policy Discussion Paper 11-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    14. Claire Greene & Joanna Stavins, 2016. "Did the Target data breach change consumer assessments of payment card security?," Research Data Report 16-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

Articles

  1. Krolikowski, Pawel & Zabek, Mike & Coate, Patrick, 2020. "Parental proximity and earnings after job displacements," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(C).
    See citations under working paper version above.Sorry, no citations of articles recorded.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 7 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (5) 2016-03-23 2018-01-15 2019-11-25 2019-11-25 2019-12-09. Author is listed
  2. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (2) 2018-01-15 2019-11-25
  3. NEP-MKT: Marketing (2) 2010-04-17 2011-05-30
  4. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (1) 2018-01-15
  5. NEP-GEO: Economic Geography (1) 2019-11-25
  6. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (1) 2019-11-25
  7. NEP-MIG: Economics of Human Migration (1) 2019-11-25

Corrections

All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. For general information on how to correct material on RePEc, see these instructions.

To update listings or check citations waiting for approval, Mike Zabek should log into the RePEc Author Service.

To make corrections to the bibliographic information of a particular item, find the technical contact on the abstract page of that item. There, details are also given on how to add or correct references and citations.

To link different versions of the same work, where versions have a different title, use this form. Note that if the versions have a very similar title and are in the author's profile, the links will usually be created automatically.

Please note that most corrections can take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.