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Simon Szreter

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First Name:Simon
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Last Name:Szreter
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RePEc Short-ID:psz10
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Research output

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Working papers

  1. Michael Woolcock & Simon Szreter & Vijayendra Rao, 2009. "How and Why Does History Matter for Development Policy?," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series 6809, GDI, The University of Manchester.

Articles

  1. Simon Szreter, 2015. "Wealth, Population, and Inequality: A Review Essay on Thomas Piketty, Capital in the Twenty-First Century," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 41(2), pages 343-354, June.
  2. Simon Szreter, 2015. "Fertility, social class, gender, and the professional model: statistical explanation and historical significance," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 68(2), pages 707-722, May.
  3. Simon Szreter, 2012. "Statistics and the public sphere: numbers and the people in modern Britain, c.1800–2000 – Edited by Tom Crook and Glen O'Hara," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 65(3), pages 1174-1176, August.
  4. Simon Szreter, 2011. "Welfare's forgotten past: a socio‐legal history of the poor law – By Lorie Charlesworth," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 64(4), pages 1384-1385, November.
  5. Michael Woolcock & Simon Szreter & Vijayendra Rao, 2011. "How and Why Does History Matter for Development Policy?," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(1), pages 70-96.
  6. Szreter, Simon, 2008. "J.C. Riley, Low Income, Social Growth, and Good Health A History of Twelve Countries , University of California Press and Milbank Memorial Fund, London (2008) ISBN 978-0-520-25286-8 pp. xvi + 229 incl," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 6(2), pages 302-303, July.
  7. simon szreter, 2008. "Gendering the fertility decline in the western world - Edited by Angelique Janssens," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 61(4), pages 1033-1035, November.
  8. Szreter, Simon, 2007. "The Right of Registration: Development, Identity Registration, and Social Security--A Historical Perspective," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 67-86, January.
  9. Simon Szreter & Eilidh Garrett, 2000. "Reproduction, Compositional Demography, and Economic Growth: Family Planning in England Long Before the Fertility Decline," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 26(1), pages 45-80.
  10. Simon Szreter & Graham Mooney, 1998. "Urbanization, Mortality, and the Standard of Living Debate: New Estimates of the Expectation of Life at Birth in Nineteenth-century British Cities," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 51(1), pages 84-112, February.

Books

  1. Breckenridge, Keith & Szreter, Simon (ed.), 2012. "Registration and Recognition: Documenting the Person in World History," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780197265314.
  2. Szreter, Simon & Sholkamy, Hania & Dharmalingam, A. (ed.), 2004. "Categories and Contexts: Anthropological and Historical Studies in Critical Demography," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199270576.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Michael Woolcock & Simon Szreter & Vijayendra Rao, 2009. "How and Why Does History Matter for Development Policy?," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series 6809, GDI, The University of Manchester.

    Cited by:

    1. Wolcott, Susan, 2010. "Explorations' contribution to the 'Asian Century'," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 47(3), pages 360-367, July.
    2. Woolcock, Michael, 2013. "Using Case Studies to Explore the External Validity of 'Complex' Development Interventions," Working Paper Series rwp13-048, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    3. Florian Becker-Ritterspach & Tico Raaijman, 2013. "Global Transfer and Indian Management," Management International Review, Springer, vol. 53(1), pages 141-166, February.
    4. Olivia D'Aoust & Olivier Sterck, 2016. "Who Benefits from Customary Justice? Rent-seeking, Bribery and Criminality in sub-Saharan Africa," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 25(3), pages 439-467.
    5. Barrientos Quiroga, Paola Andrea, 2013. "Convergence Clubs determined by Economic History in Latin America," MPRA Paper 50191, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Park, Albert Sanghoon, 2017. "Does the Development Discourse Learn from History?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 96(C), pages 52-64.
    7. Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2016. "Review Essay on British Economic Growth, 1270-1870 by Stephen Broadberry, Bruce M. S. Campbell, Alexander Klein, Mark Overton, and Bas van Leeuwen," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 54(2), pages 514-521, June.
    8. Prowse, Martin, 2011. "A century of growth? A history of tobacco production and marketing in Malawi 1890-2005," IOB Working Papers 2011.10, Universiteit Antwerpen, Institute of Development Policy (IOB).
    9. Sheraz, Umar, 2014. "Foresight as a tool for sustainable development in natural resources: The case of mineral extraction in Afghanistan," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 92-100.

Articles

  1. Michael Woolcock & Simon Szreter & Vijayendra Rao, 2011. "How and Why Does History Matter for Development Policy?," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(1), pages 70-96.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Szreter, Simon, 2007. "The Right of Registration: Development, Identity Registration, and Social Security--A Historical Perspective," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 67-86, January.

    Cited by:

    1. te Lintelo, Dolf J.H. & Haddad, Lawrence J. & Leavy, Jennifer & Lakshman, Rajith, 2014. "Measuring the commitment to reduce hunger: A hunger reduction commitment index," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 115-128.
    2. Park, Albert Sanghoon, 2017. "Does the Development Discourse Learn from History?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 96(C), pages 52-64.
    3. Srinivas, Smita, 2010. "Industrial welfare and the state: nation and city reconsidered," MPRA Paper 52651, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Arruñada Benito, 2014. "Registries," Man and the Economy, De Gruyter, vol. 1(2), pages 1-22, December.
    5. Fagernäs, Sonja, 2014. "Papers, please! The effect of birth registration on child labor and education in early 20th century USA," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 63-92.
    6. Armando Barrientos & Sony Pellissery, 2012. "Delivering effective social assistance: does politics matter?," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series esid-009-12, GDI, The University of Manchester.
    7. Armando Barrientos & Jasmina Byrne & Juan Miguel Villa & Paola Peña, 2013. "Social Transfers and Child Protection," Papers inwopa691, Innocenti Working Papers.
    8. Arjan de Haan, 2013. "The Social Policies of Emerging Economies: Growth and Welfare in China and India," Working Papers 110, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth.

  3. Simon Szreter & Eilidh Garrett, 2000. "Reproduction, Compositional Demography, and Economic Growth: Family Planning in England Long Before the Fertility Decline," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 26(1), pages 45-80.

    Cited by:

    1. Hill Kulu & Paul J. Boyle & Gunnar Andersson, 2008. "High suburban fertility: evidence from four Northern European countries," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2008-021, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    2. Hill Kulu & Paul Boyle & Gunnar Andersson, 2009. "High Suburban Fertility: Evidence from Four Northern European Countries," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 21(31), pages 915-944, December.

  4. Simon Szreter & Graham Mooney, 1998. "Urbanization, Mortality, and the Standard of Living Debate: New Estimates of the Expectation of Life at Birth in Nineteenth-century British Cities," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 51(1), pages 84-112, February.

    Cited by:

    1. Cormac Ó Gráda, 2007. "You take the high road and I’ll take the low road : economic success and wellbeing in the longer run," Open Access publications 10197/491, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    2. Aidt, T.S. & Daunton, M. & Dutta, J., 2008. "The Retrenchment Hypothesis and the Extension of the Franchise in England and Wales," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0818, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    3. Hans-Joachim Voth, 2013. "The Three Horsemen of Riches: Plague, War, and Urbanization in Early Modern Europe," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 80(2), pages 774-811.
    4. Michael Murphy, 2010. "Reexamining the Dominance of Birth Cohort Effects on Mortality," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 36(2), pages 365-390.
    5. Dorothee Crayen & Joerg Baten, 2010. "New evidence and new methods to measure human capital inequality before and during the industrial revolution: France and the US in the seventeenth to nineteenth centuries," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 63(2), pages 452-478, May.
    6. Roy E. Bailey & Timothy J. Hatton & Kris Inwood, 2014. "Health, Height and the Household at the Turn of the 20th Century," CEH Discussion Papers 029, Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    7. Kesztenbaum, Lionel & Rosenthal, Jean-Laurent, 2011. "The health cost of living in a city: The case of France at the end of the 19th century," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 48(2), pages 207-225, April.
    8. Tang, John P., 2015. "The Engine And The Reaper: Industrialization And Mortality In Early Modern Japan," RCESR Discussion Paper Series DP15-10, Research Center for Economic and Social Risks, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    9. Richard H. Steckel, 2008. "Heights and Human Welfare: Recent Developments and New Directions," NBER Working Papers 14536, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Andreas Schaefer, 2016. "Survival to Adulthood and the Growth Drag of Pollution," CER-ETH Economics working paper series 16/241, CER-ETH - Center of Economic Research (CER-ETH) at ETH Zurich.
    11. Michael R. Haines & Lee A. Craig & Thomas Weiss, 2000. "Development, Health, Nutrition, and Mortality: The Case of the 'Antebellum Puzzle' in the United States," NBER Historical Working Papers 0130, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Green, Mark A. & Dorling, Danny & Mitchell, Richard, 2018. "Updating Edwin Chadwick's seminal work on geographical inequalities by occupation," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 197(C), pages 59-62.
    13. Schumacher, Reto & Oris, Michel, 2011. "Long-term changes in social mortality differentials, Geneva, 1625-2004," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 48(3), pages 357-365, July.
    14. Peter Teibenbacher, 2012. "Fertility Decline in the southeastern Austrian Crown land. Was there a Hajnal line or a transitional zone?," Working Paper Series, Social and Economic Sciences 2012-02, Faculty of Social and Economic Sciences, Karl-Franzens-University Graz.
    15. Martinez-Carrion, Jose-Miguel & Moreno-Lazaro, Javier, 2007. "Was there an urban height penalty in Spain, 1840-1913?," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 5(1), pages 144-164, March.
    16. Pantelis Kammas & Vassilis Sarantides, 2017. "Democratisation and tax structure: Greece versus Europe from a historical perspective," GreeSE – Hellenic Observatory Papers on Greece and Southeast Europe 109, Hellenic Observatory, LSE.
    17. David Cutler & Grant Miller, 2005. "The role of public health improvements in health advances: The twentieth-century United States," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 42(1), pages 1-22, February.
    18. Robert Allen & Robert C. Allen, 2007. "Engel`s Pause: A Pessimist`s Guide to the British Industrial Revolution," Economics Series Working Papers 315, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    19. Lionel Kesztenbaum & Jean-Laurent Rosenthal, 2014. "Income versus Sanitation; Mortality Decline in Paris, 1880-1914," PSE Working Papers halshs-01018594, HAL.
    20. Peter Teibenbacher, 2012. "Fertility decline in the southeastern Austrian Crown lands. Was there a Hajnal line or a transitional zone?," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2012-020, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    21. Cormac Ó Gráda, 2005. "The tortoise and the hare : economic growth in Britain and the Netherlands c.1500-1800," Working Papers 200524, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    22. Aidt, Toke S. & Mooney, Graham, 2014. "Voting suffrage and the political budget cycle: Evidence from the London Metropolitan Boroughs 1902–1937," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 53-71.
    23. Rafael Domínguez Martín, 2001. "El debate empieza ahora: a propósito de ‘Precios de subsistencias, salarios nominales y niveles de vida en Castilla la Vieja. Palencia, 1751-1861’, de Javier Moreno," Documentos de Trabajo (DT-AEHE) 0101a, Asociacion Espa–ola de Historia Economica.
    24. Schäfer, Andreas, 2014. "The Growth Drag of Pollution," Annual Conference 2014 (Hamburg): Evidence-based Economic Policy 100576, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    25. Toke Aidt & Graham Mooney, 2014. "Voter suffrage and the political budget cycle: evidence from the London Metropolitan Boroughs 1902-1937," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1401, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    26. Toke Aidt & Graham Mooney, 2014. "Voting Suffrage and the Political Budget Cycle: Evidence from the London Metropolitan Boroughs 1902-1937," CESifo Working Paper Series 4614, CESifo Group Munich.
    27. Bernard Harris & Roderick Floud & Robert W. Fogel & Sok Chul Hong, 2010. "Diet, Health and Work Intensity in England and Wales, 1700-1914," NBER Working Papers 15875, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    28. Voigtländer, Nico & Voth, Hans-Joachim, 2009. "The Three Horsemen of Growth: Plague, War and Urbanization in Early Modern Europe," CEPR Discussion Papers 7275, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    29. Tapia Granados, José A., 2012. "Economic growth and health progress in England and Wales: 160 years of a changing relation," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 74(5), pages 688-695.

Books

  1. Breckenridge, Keith & Szreter, Simon (ed.), 2012. "Registration and Recognition: Documenting the Person in World History," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780197265314.

    Cited by:

    1. Roel Heijlen & Joep Crompvoets & Geert Bouckaert & Maxim Chantillon, 2018. "Evolving Government Information Processes for Service Delivery: Identifying Types & Impact," Administrative Sciences, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(2), pages 1-14, May.

  2. Szreter, Simon & Sholkamy, Hania & Dharmalingam, A. (ed.), 2004. "Categories and Contexts: Anthropological and Historical Studies in Critical Demography," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199270576.

    Cited by:

    1. Woolcock, Michael & Szreter, Simon & Rao, Vijayendra, 2010. "How and why does history matter for development policy ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5425, The World Bank.
    2. A. J. Christopher, 2010. "Occupational classification in the South African census before ISCO-58 -super-1," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 63(4), pages 891-914, November.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 2 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (2) 2009-10-24 2010-10-02
  2. NEP-CWA: Central & Western Asia (1) 2010-10-02
  3. NEP-EVO: Evolutionary Economics (1) 2010-10-02
  4. NEP-HPE: History & Philosophy of Economics (1) 2010-10-02
  5. NEP-PKE: Post Keynesian Economics (1) 2010-10-02
  6. NEP-SOC: Social Norms & Social Capital (1) 2010-10-02

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