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High Suburban Fertility: Evidence from Four Northern European Countries

Author

Listed:
  • Hill Kulu

    (University of St Andrews)

  • Paul Boyle

    (University of St Andrews)

  • Gunnar Andersson

    (Stockholms Universitet)

Abstract

This study examines fertility variation across different residential contexts in four Northern European countries: Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. We move beyond the conventional urban-rural focus of most previous studies of within-nation variations in fertility by distinguishing between urban centres and suburbs of cities and towns. We base our study on aggregate and individual-level register data and our analysis shows that fertility levels are significantly higher in suburbs than in urban centres; this pattern has persisted over the past quarter of a century for all four countries. A parity-specific analysis of Swedish register data reveals that total fertility varies between central cities and suburbs due to the relatively high first- and second-birth propensities in the suburbs. Further analysis shows that fertility variation between the central cities and suburbs persists after controlling for women’s socioeconomic characteristics. We discuss the role of various factors in accounting for high suburban fertility including omitted individual characteristics, contextual factors and selective residential moves of couples planning to have a child.

Suggested Citation

  • Hill Kulu & Paul Boyle & Gunnar Andersson, 2009. "High Suburban Fertility: Evidence from Four Northern European Countries," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 21(31), pages 915-944, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:21:y:2009:i:31
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    File URL: http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol21/31/21-31.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Gunnar Andersson & Kirk Scott, 2007. "Childbearing dynamics of couples in a universalistic welfare state: the role of labor-market status, country of origin, and gender," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2007-016, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    2. Gunnar Andersson & Kirk Scott, 2007. "Childbearing dynamics of couples in a universalistic welfare state," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 17(30), pages 897-938, December.
    3. Nadja Milewski, 2007. "First child of immigrant workers and their descendants in West Germany," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 17(29), pages 859-896, December.
    4. Hans-Peter Kohler & Francesco C. Billari & José Antonio Ortega, 2002. "The Emergence of Lowest-Low Fertility in Europe During the 1990s," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 28(4), pages 641-680.
    5. Simon Szreter & Eilidh Garrett, 2000. "Reproduction, Compositional Demography, and Economic Growth: Family Planning in England Long Before the Fertility Decline," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 26(1), pages 45-80.
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    Cited by:

    1. Gałka Jadwiga & Kurek Sławomir & Wójtowicz Mirosław, 2016. "Differentiation of reproductive behaviour of the population of the Kraków Metropolitan Area in the light of survey research," Bulletin of Geography. Socio-economic Series, De Gruyter Open, vol. 31(31), pages 45-57, March.
    2. Bo Malmberg, 2012. "Fertility Cycles, Age Structure and Housing Demand," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 59(5), pages 467-482, November.
    3. Kurek Sławomir & Lange Milena, 2012. "Urbanisation and changes in fertility pattern in Poland and in the selected countries of Western and Southern Europe," Bulletin of Geography. Socio-economic Series, De Gruyter Open, vol. 17(17), pages 77-85, January.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    fertility; Nordic countries; rural areas; suburban; urban areas;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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