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High Fertility in City Suburbs: Compositional or Contextual Effects?

Author

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  • H. Kulu

    (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research)

  • P. J. Boyle

    (University of St. Andrews)

Abstract

Fertility rates are known to be higher in city suburbs. One interpretation is that the suburban ‘context’ influences the behaviour of individuals who reside there while an alternative is that the ‘composition’ of the suburban population explains the higher fertility levels. Furthermore, suburban in-migrants who intend to have children may have a significant influence on suburban fertility rates. Using Finnish longitudinal register data we show that fertility rates are higher in the suburbs and rural areas and lower in the cities. Fertility variation across these residential contexts decreases significantly after controlling for women’s demographic and socio-economic characteristics. However, it does not disappear entirely suggesting that the local context may have some influence on fertility. While movers to suburbs do display higher fertility levels than non-migrant residents, their overall impact is not great because they form a small share of the suburban population.

Suggested Citation

  • H. Kulu & P. J. Boyle, 2009. "High Fertility in City Suburbs: Compositional or Contextual Effects?," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 25(2), pages 157-174, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:eurpop:v:25:y:2009:i:2:d:10.1007_s10680-008-9163-9
    DOI: 10.1007/s10680-008-9163-9
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    1. Luca Salvati, 2021. "Births and the City: Urban Cycles and Increasing Socio‐Spatial Heterogeneity in a Low‐Fertility Context," Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie, Royal Dutch Geographical Society KNAG, vol. 112(2), pages 195-215, April.
    2. Janna Bergsvik, 2019. "Linking neighbors’ fertility. Third births in Norwegian neighborhoods," Discussion Papers 898, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
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    4. Ermini, Barbara & Carlucci, Margherita & Cucci, Marianna & Rontos, Kostas & Salvati, Luca, 2024. "Suburban fertility and the role of local contexts in a Mediterranean country: A spatial exercise," Socio-Economic Planning Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 91(C).
    5. Jesús Rodrigo-Comino & Gianluca Egidi & Adele Sateriano & Stefano Poponi & Enrico Maria Mosconi & Antonio Gimenez Morera, 2021. "Suburban Fertility and Metropolitan Cycles: Insights from European Cities," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 13(4), pages 1-14, February.
    6. Synøve Andersen & Alícia Adserà & Marianne Tønnessen, 2023. "Municipality Characteristics and the Fertility of Refugees in Norway," Journal of International Migration and Integration, Springer, vol. 24(1), pages 165-208, March.
    7. Janna Bergsvik & Sara Cools & Rannveig K. Hart, 2023. "Explaining Residential Clustering of Large Families," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 39(1), pages 1-28, December.
    8. Barbara Fulda, 2015. "Culture’s Influence: Regionally Differing Social Milieus and Variations in Fertility Rates," Working Papers id:6998, eSocialSciences.
    9. Nicoletta Balbo & Francesco C. Billari & Melinda Mills, 2013. "Fertility in Advanced Societies: A Review of Research," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 29(1), pages 1-38, February.
    10. Sági, Judit & Lentner, Csaba, 2020. "A magyar népességpolitikai intézkedések tényezői és várható hatásai [Factors and expected outcomes of pro-birth policy interventions]," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(3), pages 289-308.
    11. Kurek Sławomir & Wójtowicz Mirosław & Gałka Jadwiga, 2021. "Using Spatial Autocorrelation for identification of demographic patterns of Functional Urban Areas in Poland," Bulletin of Geography. Socio-economic Series, Sciendo, vol. 52(52), pages 123-144, June.
    12. Janna Bergsvik & Sara Cools & Rannveig K. Hart, 2020. "Explaining residential clustering of fertility," Discussion Papers 939, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    13. Clara H. Mulder, 2013. "Family dynamics and housing," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 29(14), pages 355-378.
    14. Fulda, Barbara, 2015. "Culture's influence regionally differing social milieus and variations in fertility rates," MPIfG Discussion Paper 15/4, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies.
    15. N. V. Mkrtchyan, 2019. "Regional Capitals of Russia and Their Suburbs: Specifics of the Migration Balance," Regional Research of Russia, Springer, vol. 9(1), pages 12-22, January.
    16. Giuseppe Ricciardo Lamonica & Gloria Polinesi & Luca Salvati, 2022. "Sprawl or Segregation? Local Fertility as a Proxy of Socio-spatial Disparities Under Sequential Economic Downturns," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 164(3), pages 1129-1160, December.
    17. Luca Salvati, 2022. "Endogenous Population Dynamics and Metropolitan Cycles: Long-Term Evidence from Athens, an Eternally Mediterranean City," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 38(5), pages 835-860, December.
    18. de la Croix, David & Gobbi, Paula E., 2017. "Population density, fertility, and demographic convergence in developing countries," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 127(C), pages 13-24.
    19. Sergi Vidal & Johannes Huinink & Michael Feldhaus, 2017. "Fertility Intentions and Residential Relocations," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 54(4), pages 1305-1330, August.
    20. Hill Kulu & Paul Boyle & Gunnar Andersson, 2009. "High Suburban Fertility: Evidence from Four Northern European Countries," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 21(31), pages 915-944.
    21. Rares Halbac-Cotoara-Zamfir & Gianluca Egidi & Rosanna Salvia & Luca Salvati & Adele Sateriano & Antonio Gimenez-Morera, 2021. "Recession, Local Fertility, and Urban Sustainability: Results of a Quasi-Experiment in Greece, 1991–2018," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 13(3), pages 1-18, January.
    22. Gianluca Egidi & Luca Salvati, 2021. "Changes over time in the spatial structure of fertility rates as a dynamic indicator of urban transformations," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 55(1), pages 151-172, February.
    23. Samaneh Sadat Nickayin & Bogdana Nosova & Rosario Turco & Massimiliano Giacalone & Luca Salvati, 2022. "Demographic Change and the Urban–Rural Divide: Understanding the Role of Density and Agglomeration in Fertility Transitions," Land, MDPI, vol. 11(11), pages 1-16, November.

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