IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/dem/demres/v17y2007i29.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

First child of immigrant workers and their descendants in West Germany

Author

Listed:
  • Nadja Milewski

    (Universität Rostock)

Abstract

This paper investigates the impact of immigration on the transition to motherhood among women from Turkey, Italy, Spain, Greece, and the former Yugoslavia in West Germany. A hazard-regression analysis is applied to data of the German Socio-Economic Panel study. We distinguish between the first and second immigrant generation. The results show that the transition rates to a first birth of first-generation immigrants are elevated shortly after they move country. Elevated birth risks that occur shortly following the immigration are traced back to an interrelation of events - these are migration, marriage, and first birth. We do not find evidence of a fertility-disruption effect after immigration. The analysis indicates that second-generation immigrants are more adapted to the lower fertility levels of West Germans than their mothers’ generation is.

Suggested Citation

  • Nadja Milewski, 2007. "First child of immigrant workers and their descendants in West Germany," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 17(29), pages 859-896, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:17:y:2007:i:29
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol17/29/17-29.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Gjerde, Jon & McCants, Anne, 1995. "Fertility, Marriage, and Culture: Demographic Processes Among Norwegian Immigrants to the Rural Middle West," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 55(04), pages 860-888, December.
    2. FFF1Caroline H. NNN1Bledsoe, 2004. "Reproduction at the Margins: Migration and Legitimacy in the New Europe," Demographic Research Special Collections, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 3(4), pages 87-116, April.
    3. Regina T. Riphahn & Jochen Mayer, 2000. "Fertility assimilation of immigrants: Evidence from count data models," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 13(2), pages 241-261.
    4. Pau Baizán Munoz & Arnstein Aassve & Francesco C. Billari, 2001. "Cohabitation, marriage, first birth: the interrelationship of family formation events in Spain," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2001-036, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    5. Paul J. Boyle & Hill Kulu & Thomas Cooke & Vernon Gayle & Clara H. Mulder, 2006. "The effect of moving on union dissolution," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2006-002, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    6. Constant, Amelie F. & Massey, Douglas S., 2003. "Labor Market Segmentation and the Earnings of German Guestworkers," IZA Discussion Papers 774, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Nancy Landale & Susan Hauan, 1996. "Migration and premarital childbearing among Puerto Rican women," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 33(4), pages 429-442, November.
    8. Sidney Goldstein, 1973. "Interrelations between migration and fertility in Thailand," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 10(2), pages 225-241, May.
    9. Reanne Frank & Patrick Heuveline, 2005. "A cross-over in Mexican and Mexican-American fertility rates," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 12(4), pages 77-104, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. David Clifford, 2009. "Spousal separation, selectivity and contextual effects: exploring the relationship between international labour migration and fertility in post-Soviet Tajikistan," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 21(32), pages 945-975, December.
    2. Tomáš Sobotka, 2008. "Overview Chapter 7: The rising importance of migrants for childbearing in Europe," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 19(9), pages 225-248, July.
    3. Anja Vatterrott, 2011. "The fertility behaviour of East to West German migrants," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2011-013, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    4. Barbara S. Okun & Shlomit Kagya, 2012. "Fertility Change among Post-1989 Immigrants to I srael from the F ormer S oviet U nion," International Migration Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(4), pages 792-827, December.
    5. Jan M. Hoem & Lesia Nedoluzhko, 2008. "Marriage formation as a process intermediary between migration and childbearing," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 18(21), pages 611-628, June.
    6. Hill Kulu & Nadja Milewski, 2007. "Family change and migration in the life course," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 17(19), pages 567-590, December.
    7. Lesia Nedoluzhko & Gunnar Andersson, 2007. "Migration and first-time parenthood," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 17(25), pages 741-774, December.
    8. Hill Kulu & Paul Boyle & Gunnar Andersson, 2009. "High Suburban Fertility: Evidence from Four Northern European Countries," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 21(31), pages 915-944, December.
    9. Lesia Nedoluzhko & Victor Agadjanian, 2009. "Marriage, childbearing, and migration in Kyrgyzstan: exploring interdependencies," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2009-003, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    10. Alícia Adserà & Ana Ferrer, 2016. "The Fertility of Married Immigrant Women to Canada," International Migration Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(2), pages 475-505, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    event history analysis; fertility; international migration; migrant workers from South/Southeastern Europe; West Germany;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:17:y:2007:i:29. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Editorial Office). General contact details of provider: https://www.demogr.mpg.de/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.