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Fertility differences by housing type: an effect of housing conditions or of selective moves?

  • Hill Kulu

    (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany)

  • Andres Vikat

    (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany)

Registered author(s):

    This study examines fertility variation across housing types and childbearing patterns after housing changes. While the effect of family changes on housing choices has been studied in detail, little is known about childbearing patterns within various housing types, despite the fact that many studies suggest housing as an important determinant of fertility. We use longitudinal register data from Finland and apply hazard regression. Firstly, we observe a significant variation in the fertility levels across housing types – fertility is highest among couples in single-family houses and lowest among those in apartments, with the variation remaining significant even after controlling for the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of women. Secondly, our results show elevated fertility levels after couples have changed their housing, suggesting that much of the fertility variation across housing types could be attributed to selective moves. Thirdly, the study also reveals relatively a high risk of third birth for couples in single-family houses several years after the move, suggesting that living in spacious housing and in a family-friendly environment for a longer time may lead to higher fertility.

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    File URL: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/papers/working/wp-2007-014.pdf
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    Paper provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its series MPIDR Working Papers with number WP-2007-014.

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    Length: 21 pages
    Date of creation: Mar 2007
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:dem:wpaper:wp-2007-014
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

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    1. S Davies Withers, 1998. "Linking household transitions and housing transitions: a longitudinal analysis of renters," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 30(4), pages 615-630, April.
    2. M C Deurloo & W A V Clark & F M Dieleman, 1994. "The move to housing ownership in temporal and regional contexts," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 26(11), pages 1659-1670, November.
    3. William A V Clark & Youqin Huang, 2003. "The life course and residential mobility in British housing markets," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 35(2), pages 323-339, February.
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