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Was there an urban height penalty in Spain, 1840-1913?

Listed author(s):
  • Martinez-Carrion, Jose-Miguel
  • Moreno-Lazaro, Javier

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1570-677X(06)00033-5
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics & Human Biology.

Volume (Year): 5 (2007)
Issue (Month): 1 (March)
Pages: 144-164

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ehbiol:v:5:y:2007:i:1:p:144-164
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622964

References listed on IDEAS
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  1. Mosk Carl, 2000. "Secular Improvement in Weil-Being: Britain and Japan Compared," Jahrbuch für Wirtschaftsgeschichte / Economic History Yearbook, De Gruyter, vol. 41(1), pages 113-128, June.
  2. Arcaleni, Emilia, 2006. "Secular trend and regional differences in the stature of Italians, 1854-1980," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 4(1), pages 24-38, January.
  3. Millward, Robert & Bell, Frances N., 1998. "Economic factors in the decline of mortality in late nineteenth century Britain," European Review of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 2(03), pages 263-288, December.
  4. Samuel H. Preston & Michael R. Haines, 1991. "Fatal Years: Child Mortality in Late Nineteenth-Century America," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number pres91-1.
  5. Drukker J.W. & Tassenaar Vincent, 2000. "Shrinking Dutchmen in a Growing Economy: The Early Industrial Growth Paradox in the Netherlands," Jahrbuch für Wirtschaftsgeschichte / Economic History Yearbook, De Gruyter, vol. 41(1), pages 77-94, June.
  6. Simon Szreter & Graham Mooney, 1998. "Urbanization, Mortality, and the Standard of Living Debate: New Estimates of the Expectation of Life at Birth in Nineteenth-century British Cities," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 51(1), pages 84-112, February.
  7. Cussó, Xavier & Nicolau, Roser, 2000. "La mortalidad antes de entrar en la vida activa en España Comparaciones regionales e internacionales, 1860–1960," Revista de Historia Económica, Cambridge University Press, vol. 18(03), pages 525-551, December.
  8. Jacobs, Jan & Tassenaar, Vincent, 2004. "Height, income, and nutrition in the Netherlands: the second half of the 19th century," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 2(2), pages 181-195, June.
  9. Komlos, John, 1998. "Shrinking in a Growing Economy? The Mystery of Physical Stature during the Industrial Revolution," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 58(03), pages 779-802, September.
  10. Richard H. Steckel, 1999. "Industrialization and Health in Historical Perspective," NBER Historical Working Papers 0118, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Richard A. Easterlin, 2000. "The Worldwide Standard of Living since 1800," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(1), pages 7-26, Winter.
  12. Michael R. Haines & Richard H. Steckel, 2000. "Childhood Mortality & Nutritional Status as Indicators of Standard of Living: Evidence from World War I Recruits in the United States," NBER Historical Working Papers 0121, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Carri n, Jos M. Mart nez & Castej n, Juan J. P rez, 1998. "Height and standards of living during the industrialisation of Spain: The case of Elche," European Review of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 2(02), pages 201-230, August.
  14. Baten, Jorg & Murray, John E., 2000. "Heights of Men and Women in 19th-Century Bavaria: Economic, Nutritional, and Disease Influences," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 351-369, October.
  15. Crafts, N. F. R., 1997. "The Human Development Index and changes in standards of living: Some historical comparisons," European Review of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 1(03), pages 299-322, December.
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