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The height gap in 19th-century America: Net-nutritional advantage of the elite increased at the onset of modern economic growth

  • Sunder, Marco
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    We present evidence on the 19th-century trend in the height of male US passport applicants. These men represent a much wealthier segment of contemporary society than found in most stature samples previously analyzed. The height trend among the wealthy is much more robust in comparison to the average population that experienced a decline in stature. The resulting increase in the ‘height gap’—by roughly 1in. between cohorts born around 1820 and 1860—is in congruence with evidence on rising wealth inequality and the notion of dietary change in antebellum America.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1570677X13000051
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics & Human Biology.

    Volume (Year): 11 (2013)
    Issue (Month): 3 ()
    Pages: 245-258

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:ehbiol:v:11:y:2013:i:3:p:245-258
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622964

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