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The height and BMI values of West Point cadets after the Civil War

  • Hiermeyer, Martin

West Point cadets born in the 1880s were taller (+1.46Â cm) than those born in the 1860s and had significantly higher BMI values (+0.85). However, the cadets were on average undernourished by modern standards, with today's average reference values being about 5 BMI units higher than those of the cadets. Substantial regional differences existed for both height and weight. While West Point cadets born in the 1880s in the Upper South achieved on average a height of 173.2Â cm and a BMI of 21.0, their peers from New England were 171.5Â cm tall with a BMI of 21.6.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B73DX-4X6VMH7-2/2/2c3fe155379959611272ef67678ca2c3
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics & Human Biology.

Volume (Year): 8 (2010)
Issue (Month): 1 (March)
Pages: 127-133

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ehbiol:v:8:y:2010:i:1:p:127-133
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622964

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