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Height, income, and nutrition in the Netherlands: the second half of the 19th century

  • Jacobs, Jan
  • Tassenaar, Vincent

This paper explores the relationship between height and its explanatory variables, explicitly paying attention to dynamics involved in the velocity of growth. We establish that the relationship is characterized by a changing lag pattern. We try to illustrate this with recently published data on the nineteenth century for the Netherlands. We find some evidence for changing lag patterns in the relationship between height and some measures of income and nutrition.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B73DX-4C7DD0Y-1/2/39795d00aefbd6efee663d67379fe32f
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics & Human Biology.

Volume (Year): 2 (2004)
Issue (Month): 2 (June)
Pages: 181-195

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ehbiol:v:2:y:2004:i:2:p:181-195
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622964

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  1. Roderick Floud & Kenneth Wachter & Annabel Gregory, 1990. "Height, Health, and History: Nutritional Status in the United Kingdom, 1750-1980," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number flou90-1, October.
  2. Richard H. Steckel & Roderick Floud, 1997. "Health and Welfare during Industrialization," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number stec97-1, October.
  3. Baten, Jorg & Murray, John E., 2000. "Heights of Men and Women in 19th-Century Bavaria: Economic, Nutritional, and Disease Influences," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 351-369, October.
  4. John Komlos, . "Shrinking in a Growing Economy? The Mystery of Physical Stature during the Industrial Revolution," Articles by John Komlos 7, Department of Economics, University of Munich.
  5. Morten O. Ravn & Harald Uhlig, 2002. "On adjusting the Hodrick-Prescott filter for the frequency of observations," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 84(2), pages 371-375.
  6. Harvey, A C & Jaeger, A, 1993. "Detrending, Stylized Facts and the Business Cycle," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(3), pages 231-47, July-Sept.
  7. Steckel, Richard H. & Floud, Roderick (ed.), 1997. "Health and Welfare during Industrialization," National Bureau of Economic Research Books, University of Chicago Press, edition 1, number 9780226771564, May.
  8. Ulrich Woitek, 1998. "Height Cycles in the 18th and 19th Centuries," Working Papers 9811, Business School - Economics, University of Glasgow.
  9. Hans-Joachim Voth & Timothy Leunig, 1996. "Did smallpox reduce height? Stature and the standard of living in London, 1770-1873," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 49(3), pages 541-560, 08.
  10. John Komlos, 1989. "Nutrition and Economic Development in the Eighteenth-Century Habsburg Monarchy: An Anthropometric History," Books by John Komlos, Department of Economics, University of Munich, number 2, September.
  11. Richard H. Steckel, 1995. "Stature and the Standard of Living," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 33(4), pages 1903-1940, December.
  12. Hodrick, Robert J & Prescott, Edward C, 1997. "Postwar U.S. Business Cycles: An Empirical Investigation," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 29(1), pages 1-16, February.
  13. Mandemakers C. A. & Van Zanden J. L., 1993. "The Height of Conscripts and National Income: Apparent Relations and Misconceptions," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 81-97, January.
  14. Marianne Baxter & Robert G. King, 1999. "Measuring Business Cycles: Approximate Band-Pass Filters For Economic Time Series," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 81(4), pages 575-593, November.
  15. Lee A. Craig & Thomas Weiss, 1997. "Nutritional Status and Agricultural Surpluses in the Antebellum United States," NBER Historical Working Papers 0099, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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