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Are government policies efficient to regulate immigration? Evidence from France

Author

Listed:
  • Albert MILLOGO

    (Université Norbert Zongo, Koudougou, Burkina Faso)

  • Ines TROJETTE

    (ESPI Paris)

  • Nicolas PÉRIDY

    (LEAD, Université de Toulon)

Abstract

This paper explores the effects of immigration policies on migration inflows from 141 countries to France over the period 1995-2014. The main contribution of the paper holds in the estimates of policies based on the changes of French legislation up to 2014. We adopt a common correlated error model that is consistent under the assumptions of het-eroscedasticity and endogeneity due to multilateral resistance. We found that two oppo-site effects interact: admission policies failed to regulate migration flows whereas, integra-tion policy seems to have been more efficient. In particular, estimates suggest that regula-tion changes benefited the most to foreign workers rather than other categories. Finally, it appears that asylum inflows do not significantly respond to regulations. The robustness estimates using DEMIG project’s data reveal some significant differences in measuring the restriction of po-licies, that confirm the relevance of our indicators.

Suggested Citation

  • Albert MILLOGO & Ines TROJETTE & Nicolas PÉRIDY, 2021. "Are government policies efficient to regulate immigration? Evidence from France," Region et Developpement, Region et Developpement, LEAD, Universite du Sud - Toulon Var, vol. 53, pages 23-49.
  • Handle: RePEc:tou:journl:v:53:y:2021:p:23-49
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Immigration policy ; Multilateral resistance ; Gravity model ; France;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models

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