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Does class matter more than school? Evidence from a multilevel statistical analysis on Italian junior secondary school students

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  • Masci, Chiara
  • Ieva, Francesca
  • Agasisti, Tommaso
  • Paganoni, Anna Maria

Abstract

This paper assesses the differences in educational attainments between students across classes and schools they are grouped by, in the context of Italian educational system. The purpose is to identify a relationship between pupils' reading test scores and students' characteristics, stratifying for classes, schools and geographical areas. The dataset contains detailed information about more than 500,000 students at the first year of junior secondary school in the year 2012/2013. By means of multilevel linear models, it is possible to estimate statistically significant school and class effects, after adjusting for pupil's characteristics, including prior achievement. The results show that school and class effects are very heterogeneous across macro-areas (Northern, Central and Southern Italy), and that there are substantial discrepancies between and within schools; overall, class effects on achievement tend to be larger than school ones.

Suggested Citation

  • Masci, Chiara & Ieva, Francesca & Agasisti, Tommaso & Paganoni, Anna Maria, 2016. "Does class matter more than school? Evidence from a multilevel statistical analysis on Italian junior secondary school students," Socio-Economic Planning Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 47-57.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:soceps:v:54:y:2016:i:c:p:47-57
    DOI: 10.1016/j.seps.2016.03.001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:ejores:v:269:y:2018:i:3:p:1072-1085 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Tommaso Agasisti & Francesca Ieva & Anna Maria Paganoni, 2017. "Heterogeneity, school-effects and the North/South achievement gap in Italian secondary education: evidence from a three-level mixed model," Statistical Methods & Applications, Springer;Società Italiana di Statistica, vol. 26(1), pages 157-180, March.
    3. repec:eee:soceps:v:61:y:2018:i:c:p:52-69 is not listed on IDEAS

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