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The influence of school size, principal characteristics and school management practices on educational performance: An efficiency analysis of Italian students attending middle schools

Author

Listed:
  • Masci, Chiara
  • De Witte, Kristof
  • Agasisti, Tommaso

Abstract

The aim of the paper is to identify which among the aspects that relate to the composition of the student body, school (district) size, management practices and the school principals' own characteristics are associated with the performance of Italian students at grade 8, measured through standardised test scores in reading and mathematics. The analysis makes use of a student-level efficiency model, and several school level variables are included as explanators for efficiency scores. The results show that, especially for reading, the most influential variables relate to the composition of the student body, while the students' performance in mathematics is partly correlated with the management practices adopted by the school principal/head teacher. Schools and schooling can only explain a minor part of the variance in achievement scores, however, and the characteristics of the students themselves play the most significant role.

Suggested Citation

  • Masci, Chiara & De Witte, Kristof & Agasisti, Tommaso, 2018. "The influence of school size, principal characteristics and school management practices on educational performance: An efficiency analysis of Italian students attending middle schools," Socio-Economic Planning Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 52-69.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:soceps:v:61:y:2018:i:c:p:52-69
    DOI: 10.1016/j.seps.2016.09.009
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Pupils achievement; Schools efficiency; Management practices; Principal characteristics;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • C14 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Semiparametric and Nonparametric Methods: General

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