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On the Choice of Control Variables in the Crime Equation

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  • Carlisle E. Moody
  • Thomas B. Marvell

Abstract

Although control variables are the reason for multiple regression, surprising little attention is given to the process of locating and selecting the controls. If important controls are omitted, estimates can be biased and inconsistent whereas using too many controls can reduce efficiency and mask effects. We advocate a much broader search for controls than is customary, at least in the crime literature, and then the use of the general-to-specific methodology to select the relevant controls. We illustrate this procedure using a fixed effects panel data design evaluating the effect of legalized abortion on crime. Copyright (c) Blackwell Publishing Ltd and the Department of Economics, University of Oxford, 2010.

Suggested Citation

  • Carlisle E. Moody & Thomas B. Marvell, 2010. "On the Choice of Control Variables in the Crime Equation," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 72(5), pages 696-715, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:obuest:v:72:y:2010:i:5:p:696-715
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    Cited by:

    1. Chudik, Alexander & Pesaran, M. Hashem & Yang, Jui-Chung, 2016. "Half-panel jackknife fixed effects estimation of panels with weakly exogenous regressor," Globalization and Monetary Policy Institute Working Paper 281, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
    2. Islam,Asif Mohammed, 2016. "An exploration of the relationship between police presence, crime, and business in developing countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7560, The World Bank.
    3. Michał Brzeziński & Maria Halber, 2012. "Testing the Perturbation Sensitivity of Abortion-Crime Regressions," Contemporary Economics, University of Finance and Management in Warsaw, vol. 6(2), June.
    4. Alvaro Cuervo-Cazurra & Ulf Andersson & Mary Yoko Brannen & Bo Bernhard Nielsen & A. Rebecca Reuber, 2016. "From the Editors: Can I trust your findings? Ruling out alternative explanations in international business research," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Academy of International Business, vol. 47(8), pages 881-897, October.

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