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Short- And Long-Run Decompositions Of Uk Wage Inequality Changes


  • Terence Huw Edwards
  • John Whalley


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  • Terence Huw Edwards & John Whalley, 2007. "Short- And Long-Run Decompositions Of Uk Wage Inequality Changes," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 59(1), pages 1-24, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:buecrs:v:59:y:2007:i:1:p:1-24

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Keane, Michael & Moffitt, Robert, 1998. "A Structural Model of Multiple Welfare Program Participation and Labor Supply," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 39(3), pages 553-589, August.
    2. John Creedy & Guyonne Kalb, 2005. "Discrete Hours Labour Supply Modelling: Specification, Estimation and Simulation," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(5), pages 697-734, December.
    3. Arthur van Soest, 1995. "Structural Models of Family Labor Supply: A Discrete Choice Approach," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 30(1), pages 63-88.
    4. Guyonne Kalb, 2002. "Estimation of Labour Supply Models for Four Separate Groups in the Australian Population," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2002n24, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    5. John Creedy & Guyonne Kalb & Hsein Kew, 2003. "Flattening the Effective Marginal Tax Rate Structure in Australia: Policy Simulations Using the Melbourne Institute Tax and Transfer Simulator," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 36(2), pages 156-172.
    6. John Creedy & Alan S. Duncan & Mark Harris & Rosanna Scutella, 2002. "Microsimulation Modelling of Taxation and the Labour Market," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 2796.
    7. Pudney, Stephen & Sutherland, Holly, 1994. "How reliable are microsimulation results? : An analysis of the role of sampling error in a U.K. tax-benefit model," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(3), pages 327-365, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Iain Fraser & Robert Waschik, 2010. "The Double Dividend Hypothesis in a CGE Model: Specific Factors and Variable Labour Supply," Working Papers 2010.02, School of Economics, La Trobe University.
    2. Fraser, Iain & Waschik, Robert, 2013. "The Double Dividend hypothesis in a CGE model: Specific factors and the carbon base," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 283-295.
    3. Keshab Raj BHATTARAI, "undated". "Dynamic Multi-Household General Economic Models for Policy Simulations: France, Germany, Spain and UK," EcoMod2009 21500014, EcoMod.
    4. Akay, Gokhan H., 2012. "Trade and factor returns: Empirical evidence from U.S. economy," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 77-86.
    5. Gokhan Akay & Can Dogan, 2013. "The effect of labor supply changes on output: empirical evidence from US industries," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 39(2), pages 123-130, April.
    6. Keshab Bhattarai, 2016. "Growth and Income Distributions in Four EU Economies," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 22(3), pages 263-277, August.

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