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Citations for "Evolution of forecast disagreement in a Bayesian learning model"

by Lahiri, Kajal & Sheng, Xuguang

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  1. Pierre L Siklos, 2013. "Forecast disagreement and the anchoring of inflation expectations in the Asia-Pacific Region," BIS Papers chapters, in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Globalisation and inflation dynamics in Asia and the Pacific, volume 70, pages 25-40 Bank for International Settlements.
  2. Stefano Eusepi & Richard Crump & Emanuel Moench & Philippe Andrade, 2014. "Noisy Information and Fundamental Disagreement," 2014 Meeting Papers 797, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  3. Patton, Andrew J. & Timmermann, Allan, 2010. "Why do forecasters disagree? Lessons from the term structure of cross-sectional dispersion," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(7), pages 803-820, October.
  4. Chanont Banternghansa & Michael W. McCracken, 2009. "Forecast disagreement among FOMC members," Working Papers 2009-059, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
  5. Alia Gizatulina, 2013. "Wondering How Others Interpret It: Social Value of Public Information," Working Paper Series of the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods 2013_08, Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods.
  6. Clements, Michael P., 2014. "Probability distributions or point predictions? Survey forecasts of US output growth and inflation," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 99-117.
  7. Xuguang Sheng & Jingyun Yang, 2013. "Truncated Product Methods for Panel Unit Root Tests," Working Papers 2013-004, The George Washington University, Department of Economics, Research Program on Forecasting.
  8. Tara M. Sinclair & Jeff Messina & Herman Stekler, 2014. "What Can We Learn From Revisions to the Greenbook Forecasts?," Working Papers 2014-14, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
  9. Xuguang Sheng & Maya Thevenot, 2013. "Differential Interpretation of Public Information: Estimation and Inference," Working Papers 2013-03, American University, Department of Economics.
  10. Clements, Michael P., 2008. "Explanations of the inconsistencies in survey respondents'forecasts," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 870, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
  11. Andrade, P. & Ghysels, E. & Idier, J., 2012. "Tails of Inflation Forecasts and Tales of Monetary Policy," Working papers 407, Banque de France.
  12. Aaron Mehrotra & James Yetman, 2014. "How anchored are inflation expectations in Asia? Evidence from surveys of professional forecasters," BIS Papers chapters, in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Globalisation, inflation and monetary policy in Asia and the Pacific, volume 77, pages 181-191 Bank for International Settlements.
  13. Dovern, Jonas & Fritsche, Ulrich & Loungani, Prakash & Tamirisa, Natalia, 2013. "Information Rigidities in Economic Growth Forecasts: Evidence from a Large International Panel," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79936, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  14. Paul Hubert, 2013. "FOMC forecasts as a focal point for private expectations," Documents de Travail de l'OFCE 2013-12, Observatoire Francais des Conjonctures Economiques (OFCE).
  15. Deschamps, Bruno & Ioannidis, Christos, 2013. "Can rational stubbornness explain forecast biases?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 141-151.
  16. Michael P. Clements, 2014. "US Inflation Expectations and Heterogeneous Loss Functions, 1968–2010," Journal of Forecasting, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 33(1), pages 1-14, 01.
  17. Kajal Lahiri & Xuguang Sheng, 2009. "Learning and Heterogeneity in GDP and Inflation Forecasts," Discussion Papers 09-05, University at Albany, SUNY, Department of Economics.
  18. Dovern, Jonas & Weisser, Johannes, 2011. "Accuracy, unbiasedness and efficiency of professional macroeconomic forecasts: An empirical comparison for the G7," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 452-465, April.
  19. Carlos Capistrán & Gabriel López-Moctezuma, 2010. "Forecast Revisions of Mexican Inflation and GDP Growth," Working Papers 2010-11, Banco de México.
  20. Sheng, Xuguang (Simon) & Thevenot, Maya, 2015. "Quantifying differential interpretation of public information using financial analysts’ earnings forecasts," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 515-530.
  21. repec:amu:wpaper:2013-04 is not listed on IDEAS
  22. Dovern, Jonas & Fritsche, Ulrich & Loungani, Prakash & Tamirisa, Natalia, 2015. "Information rigidities: Comparing average and individual forecasts for a large international panel," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 144-154.
  23. Clements, Michael P, 2011. "Do Professional Forecasters Pay Attention to Data Releases?," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 956, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
  24. Thomas Maag & Michael J. Lamla, 2009. "The Role of Media for Inflation Forecast Disagreement of Households and Professionals," KOF Working papers 09-223, KOF Swiss Economic Institute, ETH Zurich.
  25. Alia Gizatulina, 2012. "Interpreting How Others Interpret It: Social Value of Public Information," CESifo Working Paper Series 3787, CESifo Group Munich.
  26. Capistrán, Carlos & López-Moctezuma, Gabriel, 2014. "Forecast revisions of Mexican inflation and GDP growth," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 177-191.
  27. Richard Dennis, 2012. "Sources of Disagreement in Inflation Forecasts: An International Empirical Investigation," CAMA Working Papers 2012-42, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  28. Lena Dräger & Michael J. Lamla, 2015. "Disagreement à la Taylor: Evidence from Survey Microdata," Macroeconomics and Finance Series 201503, Hamburg University, Department Wirtschaft und Politik.
  29. Siklos, Pierre L., 2013. "Sources of disagreement in inflation forecasts: An international empirical investigation," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(1), pages 218-231.
  30. Kajal Lahiri, 2012. "Comment on "Forecast Rationality Tests Based on Multi-Horizon Bounds" by Andrew Patton and Allan Timmermann. Journal of Business and Economic Statistics, No. 1, Vol. 30, 2012, pp.1-17," Discussion Papers 12-10, University at Albany, SUNY, Department of Economics.
  31. Clements, Michael P, 2012. "Subjective and Ex Post Forecast Uncertainty : US Inflation and Output Growth," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 995, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
  32. Dovern, Jonas, 2014. "A Multivariate Analysis of Forecast Disagreement: Confronting Models of Disagreement with SPF Data," Working Papers 0571, University of Heidelberg, Department of Economics.
  33. Bennani, Hamza, 2014. "Does one word fit all? The asymmetric effects of central banks' communication policy," MPRA Paper 57150, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  34. Kajal Lahiri & Xuguang Sheng, 2009. "Measuring Forecast Uncertainty by Disagreement: The Missing Link," Discussion Papers 09-06, University at Albany, SUNY, Department of Economics.
  35. Beechey, Meredith & Österholm, Pär, 2010. "Forecasting inflation in an inflation-targeting regime: A role for informative steady-state priors," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 248-264, April.
  36. Song, ChiUng & Boulier, Bryan L. & Stekler, Herman O., 2009. "Measuring consensus in binary forecasts: NFL game predictions," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 182-191.
  37. Bank for International Settlements, 2014. "Globalisation, inflation and monetary policy in Asia and the Pacific," BIS Papers, Bank for International Settlements, number 77, March.
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