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Do Professional Forecasters Pay Attention to Data Releases?

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  • Clements, Michael P.

Abstract

We present a novel approach to assessing the attentiveness of professional forecasters to news about the macroeconomy. We Önd evidence that professional forecasters, taken as a group, do not always update their estimates of the current state of the economy to reáect the latest releases of revised estimates of key data.

Suggested Citation

  • Clements, Michael P., 2011. "Do Professional Forecasters Pay Attention to Data Releases?," Economic Research Papers 270768, University of Warwick - Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:uwarer:270768
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.270768
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    Cited by:

    1. Pedersen, Michael, 2015. "What affects the predictions of private forecasters? The role of central bank forecasts in Chile," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 31(4), pages 1043-1055.
    2. de Mendonça, Helder Ferreira & Vereda, Luciano & Araujo, Mateus de Azevedo, 2022. "What type of information calls the attention of forecasters? Evidence from survey data in an emerging market," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 129(C).
    3. Katharina Glass & Ulrich Fritsche, 2015. "Real-time Macroeconomic Data and Uncertainty," Macroeconomics and Finance Series 201406, University of Hamburg, Department of Socioeconomics.
    4. Ilek, Alex, 2021. "Are monetary surprises effective? The view of professional forecasters in Israel," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 516-530.
    5. Nikos Apokoritis & Gabriele Galati & Richhild Moessner & Federica Teppa, 2019. "Inflation expectations anchoring: new insights from micro evidence of a survey at high-frequency and of distributions," BIS Working Papers 809, Bank for International Settlements.
    6. Meade, Nigel & Driver, Ciaran, 2023. "Differing behaviours of forecasters of UK GDP growth," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 772-790.
    7. Berge, Travis J. & Chang, Andrew C. & Sinha, Nitish R., 2019. "Evaluating the conditionality of judgmental forecasts," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 1627-1635.
    8. Ullrich Heilemann & Karsten Müller, 2018. "Wenig Unterschiede – Zur Treffsicherheit Internationaler Prognosen und Prognostiker [Few differences—on the accuracy of international forecasts and forecaster]," AStA Wirtschafts- und Sozialstatistisches Archiv, Springer;Deutsche Statistische Gesellschaft - German Statistical Society, vol. 12(3), pages 195-233, December.
    9. Heilemann Ullrich & Schnorr-Bäcker Susanne, 2017. "Could the start of the German recession 2008–2009 have been foreseen? Evidence from Real-Time Data," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 237(1), pages 29-62, February.
    10. Hossein Hassani & Jan Coreman & Saeed Heravi & Joshy Easaw, 2018. "Forecasting Inflation Rate: Professional Against Academic, Which One is More Accurate," Journal of Quantitative Economics, Springer;The Indian Econometric Society (TIES), vol. 16(3), pages 631-646, September.
    11. Keith Sill, 2014. "Forecast disagreement in the Survey of Professional Forecasters," Business Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, issue Q2, pages 15-24.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Financial Economics;

    JEL classification:

    • C53 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Forecasting and Prediction Models; Simulation Methods

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