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How anchored are inflation expectations in Asia? Evidence from surveys of professional forecasters

In: Globalisation, inflation and monetary policy in Asia and the Pacific

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  • Aaron Mehrotra
  • James Yetman

    (Bank for International Settlements)

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Aaron Mehrotra & James Yetman, 2014. "How anchored are inflation expectations in Asia? Evidence from surveys of professional forecasters," BIS Papers chapters,in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Globalisation, inflation and monetary policy in Asia and the Pacific, volume 77, pages 181-191 Bank for International Settlements.
  • Handle: RePEc:bis:bisbpc:77-17
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    File URL: http://www.bis.org/publ/bppdf/bispap77o_rh.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. N. Gregory Mankiw & Ricardo Reis, 2002. "Sticky Information versus Sticky Prices: A Proposal to Replace the New Keynesian Phillips Curve," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(4), pages 1295-1328.
    2. Devereux, Michael B & Yetman, James, 2003. " Predetermined Prices and the Persistent Effects of Money on Output," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 35(5), pages 729-741, October.
    3. Jonas Dovern & Ulrich Fritsche, 2008. "Estimating fundamental cross-section dispersion from fixed event forecasts," Macroeconomics and Finance Series 200801, Hamburg University, Department Wirtschaft und Politik.
    4. Siklos, Pierre L., 2013. "Sources of disagreement in inflation forecasts: An international empirical investigation," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, pages 218-231.
    5. Jonas Dovern & Ulrich Fritsche, 2008. "Estimating fundamental cross-section dispersion from fixed event forecasts," Macroeconomics and Finance Series 200801, Hamburg University, Department Wirtschaft und Politik.
    6. Aaron Mehrotra & James Yetman, 2014. "Decaying expectations: what inflation forecasts tell us about the anchoring of inflation expectations," BIS Working Papers 464, Bank for International Settlements.
    7. Gregory, Allan W. & Yetman, James, 2004. "The evolution of consensus in macroeconomic forecasting," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 461-473.
    8. Zarnowitz, Victor & Lambros, Louis A, 1987. "Consensus and Uncertainty in Economic Prediction," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 95(3), pages 591-621, June.
    9. Jonas Dovern & Ulrich Fritsche & Jiri Slacalek, 2012. "Disagreement Among Forecasters in G7 Countries," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, pages 1081-1096.
    10. Mikael Carlsson & Oskar Nordstrom Skans, 2012. "Evaluating Microfoundations for Aggregate Price Rigidities: Evidence from Matched Firm-Level Data on Product Prices and Unit Labor Cost," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 1571-1595.
    11. Andrew Filardo & Hans Genberg, 2010. "Targeting inflation in Asia and the Pacific: lessons from the recent past," BIS Papers chapters,in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), The international financial crisis and policy challenges in Asia and the Pacific, volume 52, pages 251-273 Bank for International Settlements.
    12. Ingrid Größl & Ulrich Fritsche, 2007. "The Store-of-Value-Function of Money as a Component of Household Risk Management," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 660, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    13. Jeff Fuhrer & George Moore, 1995. "Inflation Persistence," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(1), pages 127-159.
    14. Lahiri, Kajal & Sheng, Xuguang, 2008. "Evolution of forecast disagreement in a Bayesian learning model," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, pages 325-340.
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    Cited by:

    1. Aaron Mehrotra & James Yetman, 2014. "Decaying expectations: what inflation forecasts tell us about the anchoring of inflation expectations," BIS Working Papers 464, Bank for International Settlements.
    2. Blaise Gadanecz & Ken Miyajima & Jörg Urban, 2014. "How might EME central banks respond to the influence of global monetary factors?," BIS Papers chapters,in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), The transmission of unconventional monetary policy to the emerging markets, volume 78, pages 45-69 Bank for International Settlements.

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